Grants for Agricultural Research, Special Research Grants

To carry out research, to facilitate or expand promising breakthroughs in areas of the food and agricultural sciences of importance to the nation and to facilitate or expand on-going State-Federal food and agricultural research programs.

credit: Wikimedia Commons



Related Programs

Examples of Funded Projects

Fiscal Year 2016: The following represents examples of funded projects for active Programs: (B) Global Change Ultraviolet Radiation Monitoring and Research Program (GC/UV-B): The USDA has long been concerned about high levels of ultraviolet radiation from the Sun, which are known to have harmful effects on agricultural crops, rangelands, forest ecosystems, humans, and livestock.

The purpose of this program is to support research which: ? generates an uninterrupted stream of climatology data; ? determines mechanisms and symptoms of plant and animal response; and applies tightly integrated crop and climate models to assess regional and national impacts (both biological and economic) of multiple plant stressors. (D) Minor Crop Pest Management Program Interregional Research Project #4: This project continued support for four (4) regional Centers plus a National Headquarters Office.

Since the plant protection industry has little economic incentive to develop registrations for specialty crop chemicals, IR-4 develops the data that provide legal, effective, safe and IPM-compatible pest control agents for minor and specialty crops.

Without this program, many specialty crops could no longer be produced in the US or would be greatly compromised in cost and quality.

This project?s objectives for minor and specialty crops are to obtain pesticide clearances for food uses, further the development and adoption of biopesticides, and conduct research to protect ornamental crops.

(F) Special Research Grants Program Potato Breeding Research: Potato Variety Development and Improvement in the Northwest The objective of this research is to release and commercialize new potato varieties that will directly benefit all segments of the Northwest potato industry and indirectly benefit all US producing regions.

The strategy is to identify traits, make crosses, and apply selection pressures that will increase the probability of developing varieties that can be produced and utilized more efficiently than existing varieties.

Appropriate breeding goals include high yield, improved processing quality, genetic resistance to major pests and diseases, higher levels of resistance to stresses, increased nutrient use efficiency, improved human nutritional value, and high tuber quality.

An additional environmental benefit comes with reduced use of pesticides, water, and fertilizers, which are normal by-products of improved varieties.

This major objective is accompanied by myriad minor objectives involving germplasm enhancement, germplasm production, selection procedures, disease and stress screening, variety trial design and conduct, seed increases, management studies, and commercial evaluations.

Each objective is to be carried out by the Northwest institution(s) best equipped to complete the associated tasks.

A heavy element of interdependence among all institutions is essential in achieving the outlined objectives. Potato Breeding and Cultivar Development in the Southwest The Southwestern Regional Potato Cultivar Development Project was initiated by several universities to meet the unique needs of the Southwest potato industry.

Crosses and original selections are made in Colorado and Texas followed by formal regional evaluation trials in all three (3) states.

Breeding stocks and advanced selections are openly shared with more than a dozen other states.

Promising selections from the Project are further evaluated in the Western Regional Trials which include seven (7) Western states.

Specific goals and objectives are developed and constantly reevaluated based on extensive stakeholder input.

Since the inception of the Southwestern Regional Potato Cultivar Development Project in 1997, 48 new cultivars and clonal selections have been released or co-released with other institutions which make up substantial and increasing portions of the regional potato acreage and have become important contributors to the economies of the states.

Of newly released cultivars since 1997, and ranking in the top 50 cultivars that were accepted for seed certification in the US in 2015, cultivars developed by the Southwestern Regional Potato Cultivar Development Project ranked second among the regional projects. Development Of Multipurpose Potato Cultivars With Enhanced Quality, Disease And Pest Resistance?North Central Region Potato production is in the North Central US is vital to the regional economy and plays an important role in the national potato supply.

In 2015 the four (4) states of Michigan, Minnesota, North Dakota, and Wisconsin accounted for 22% of the US acreage, with a farm-gate value of $856 million.

All sectors of the potato market are present in this region, dominated by fry and chip processing markets, with a successful fresh market and expanding specialty market niches.

Changes in climate, consumer preference, production economics, and environmental regulations require continual innovation in the potato industry, and plant breeding leading to variety commercialization is critical to meeting these evolving demands.

This proposal, which is a joint effort of the potato breeding and genetics programs at four (4) North Central land-grant universities.

There are four (4) specific objectives are detailed as follows: (1) to identify new varieties with superior agronomics and end-used quality via hybridization and selection; (2) to screen elite germplasm for resistance to key pests; (3) to use genetic markers to improve breeding efficiency; and (4) to transfer new varieties from the breeding programs to the commercial sector.

The four (4) project directors and their collaborators have the requisite experience, facilities, and stakeholder relationships to successfully complete these objectives.

The expected outcomes from the one-year grant include the release of new varieties, the selection of new breeding lines, new markers for marker-assisted selection, and preliminary data on the feasibility of using genome-wide marker analyses for improving variety development. Potato Breeding and Variety Development for Improved Quality and Pest Resistance in the Eastern United States This is an integrated, seven-state (Florida, Maine, North Carolina, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Virginia) potato breeding and variety development project for the eastern U.S.

Four (4) states maintain breeding programs.

Collaborative multi-site selection, evaluation, and variety development work is conducted in all states.

Breeding objectives and priorities are determined from stakeholder input.

The overall goal is to develop attractive, productive, disease- and insect-resistant potato varieties that can be employed by small and large potato producers to enhance marketing opportunities, farm sustainability and profits.

The specific objectives are: (1) Improve productivity and quality for important eastern U.S.

markets by developing and releasing superior potato varieties using conventional and marker-assisted potato breeding methods; (2) Reduce the impact of economically important biotic and abiotic potato production constraints by breeding and developing improved potato germplasm; (3) Select widely-adapted potato varieties by screening yield, quality, and pest resistance traits at multiple eastern locations; (4) Facilitate commercial adoption of improved new varieties by coordinating initial commercial trials and by developing production management recommendations; and (5) Enhance the availability and use of project-related, research-based information through the use of digital media.

Development of varieties with resistance to important diseases such as late blight, scab, potato virus y, early blight, and golden nematode is a long-term priority.

The project focuses on classical breeding techniques, but also includes development and use of marker-assisted selection for key traits.

Our selection procedures utilize diverse eastern growing conditions to select potato germplasm with resistance to pests, heat stress, and stress-related defects. (H) Special Research Grants Program Aquaculture Research (aka Aquaculture Centers): Development and Management of Canola in the Great Plains Region The long-term goal of this project is to facilitate the adoption of winter canola into cropping systems of the Southern Great Plains (SGP).

The project will focus on the high priority areas of developing and testing of superior cultivars, improving methods of production, and transferring of new knowledge to producers.

New cultivars developed under SGP conditions will possess enhanced winter survival, higher yield potential, greater oil content, and herbicide tolerance.

To date, the project has released a new variety of winter canola called ?Torrington?, a variety that yields 9.7% greater than the most widely grown cultivars in the SGP.

Two (2) additional cultivars will be considered for full release in 2017.

The project tested 48 varieties in FYs 2015/16, including 23 that are commercially available, and 36 in the FYs 2016/17 season.

Project results can be found at http://www.agronomy.k-state.edu/services/crop-performance-tests/index.html.

In addition the team has conducted seeding studies and harvest management studies that have been published as an extension bulletin to help farmers with their management.

The team has communicated these results through 19 individual events in both Oklahoma and Kansas that reached 925 people.

Improving Canola Production and Production Systems with Genetic and Agronomic Advances to Increase Canola Acreage in the Pacific Northwest. Pacific Northwest (PNW) dryland agriculture is dominated by small-grain cereals due to high dryland wheat yields.

This project will aim to increase canola production in this area since it can lend sustainability to a current system of monoculture cereal production, with some of the highest canola yields in the US.

This project will develop genetically superior cultivars, identify and quantify economic and rotational benefits of integrating a canola rotation, identify management strategies, conduct surveys for the impact of blackleg disease, and produce a manual for PNW canola production.

To date the team has identified and field evaluated just over 3000 genetic lines and regionally tested seven (7) advanced lines.

The spring canola cultivar ?empire? was released and foundation seed was produced for cultivar that is a fry oil and three (3) new winter cultivars with high herbicide tolerance.

The team has tested 74 regional cultivars throughout four (4) states. The four (4) projects funded in the 2016 competition include: (1) Why has U.S.

Aquaculture Struggled Economically? Identifying Key Current and Future Determinants of Economic Sustainability; (2) Improving Aquaculture's Value through Enhanced Nutrient Management; (3) Identification of the risks of emerging Flavobacteria to early life stages of farmed salmonids and development of improved control strategies; and (4) Validation of markers and marker-assisted selection of hard clam for resistance to QPX disease. (I) Supplemental and Alternative Crops Competitive Grants Program (aka Canola Research and SACC): Development and Management of Canola in the Great Plains Region The long-term goal of this project is to facilitate the adoption of winter canola into cropping systems of the Southern Great Plains (SGP).

The project will focus on the high priority areas of developing and testing of superior cultivars, improving methods of production, and transferring of new knowledge to producers.

New cultivars developed under SGP conditions will possess enhanced winter survival, higher yield potential, greater oil content, and herbicide tolerance.

To date, the project has released a new variety of winter canola called ?Torrington?, a variety that yields 9.7% greater than the most widely grown cultivars in the SGP.

Two additional cultivars will be considered for full release in 2017.

The project tested 48 varieties in 2015/16, including 23 that are commercially available, and 36 in the 2016/17 season.

Project results can be found at http://www.agronomy.k-state.edu/services/crop-performance-tests/index.html.

In addition the team has conducted seeding studies and harvest management studies that have been published as an extension bulletin to help farmers with their management.

The team has communicated these results through 19 individual events in both Oklahoma and Kansas that reached 925 people.

Improving Canola Production and Production Systems with Genetic and Agronomic Advances to Increase Canola Acreage in the Pacific Northwest. Pacific Northwest (PNW) dryland agriculture is dominated by small-grain cereals due to high dryland wheat yields.

This project will aim to increase canola production in this area since it can lend sustainability to a current system of monoculture cereal production, with some of the highest canola yields in the US.

This project will develop genetically superior cultivars, identify and quantify economic and rotational benefits of integrating a canola rotation, identify management strategies, conduct surveys for the impact of blackleg disease, and produce a manual for PNW canola production.

To date the team has identified and field evaluated just over 3000 genetic lines and regionally tested seven (7) advanced lines.

The spring canola cultivar ?empire? was released and foundation seed was produced for cultivar that is a fry oil and three new winter cultivars with high herbicide tolerance.

The team has tested 74 regional cultivars throughout four (4) states. The following Programs are no longer funded: hence, no action is required: (A) Expert IPM Decision Support Systems (C ) Integrated Pest Management & Biological Control (Special Research Grants): (E) Pest Management Alternatives (PMAP): (G) Critical Agricultural Materials: (J) Policy Research Centers (aka Agriculture and Rural Policy Research): (K) McIntire-Stennis Cooperative Forestry Research aka Rangeland Research Program (L) Forest Products Research Grants Program: (M) Minor Use Animal Drugs: (N) National Biological Impact Assessment Program: (R) Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (SNAP & EFNEP): Regional Nutrition Education and Obesity Prevention Centers of Excellence (RNECE):.

Fiscal Year 2017: The following represents examples of funded projects for active Programs: (B) Global Change Ultraviolet Radiation Monitoring and Research Program (GC/UV-B): The USDA has long been concerned about high levels of ultraviolet radiation from the Sun, which are known to have harmful effects on agricultural crops, rangelands, forest ecosystems, humans, and livestock.

The purpose of this program is to support research which: ? generates an uninterrupted stream of climatology data; ? determines mechanisms and symptoms of plant and animal response; and applies tightly integrated crop and climate models to assess regional and national impacts (both biological and economic) of multiple plant stressors. (D) Minor Crop Pest Management Program Interregional Research Project #4: This project has continued support for four (4) regional Centers plus a National Headquarters Office.

Since the plant protection industry has little economic incentive to develop registrations for specialty crop chemicals, IR-4 develops the data that provide legal, effective, safe and IPM-compatible pest control agents for minor and specialty crops.

Without this program, many specialty crops could no longer be produced in the US or would be greatly compromised in cost and quality.

This project?s objectives for minor and specialty crops are to obtain pesticide clearances for food uses, further the development and adoption of biopesticides, and conduct research to protect ornamental crops.

There are five (5) regions that can apply for IR-4 funding and five (5) awards were made. (F) Special Research Grants Program Potato Breeding Research: Three (3) of the projects above were awarded as renewals.

The project entitled ?Potato Breeding and Cultivar Development in the Southwest? was awarded as a new project with objectives to build on previous work. (H) Special Research Grants Program Aquaculture Research (aka Aquaculture Centers): The four (4) projects funded in the FY 2017 competition include: (1) Biomanipulation as a tool to enhance aquaculture through the management of toxic cyanobacteria; (2) Bioeconomics of columnaris vaccines in channel catfish aquaculture; (3) Oral Vaccine for Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus; and (4) Production of reproductively sterile rainbow trout for environmentally-responsible and economically-sustainable US aquaculture industry. (I) Supplemental and Alternative Crops Competitive Grants Program (aka Canola Research and SACC): Systems-based approach to winter canola management in the southern Great Plains (Lofton) The goal of this project is to expand winter canola acres in the Southern Great Plains and provide growers with detailed knowledge of winter canola production and management.

This will be achieved by addressing major aspects of canola production and extending research efforts to producers and industry representatives throughout the region through targeted outreach events and information sharing.

The project innovate new planting, cultivating, harvesting, and processing methods for use in production systems that include canola and transfer this new knowledge to producers.

Fiscal Year 2018: The following represents examples of funded projects for active Programs: (B) Global Change Ultraviolet Radiation Monitoring and Research Program (GC/UV-B): The USDA has long been concerned about high levels of ultraviolet radiation from the Sun, which are known to have harmful effects on agricultural crops, rangelands, forest ecosystems, humans, and livestock.

The purpose of this program is to support research which: ? generates an uninterrupted stream of climatology data; ? determines mechanisms and symptoms of plant and animal response; and applies tightly integrated crop and climate models to assess regional and national impacts (both biological and economic) of multiple plant stressors. (D) Minor Crop Pest Management Program Interregional Research Project #4: It is anticipated that this project will continue continued support for four (4) regional Centers plus a National Headquarters Office.

Since the plant protection industry has little economic incentive to develop registrations for specialty crop chemicals, IR-4 develops the data that provide legal, effective, safe and IPM-compatible pest control agents for minor and specialty crops.

Without this program, many specialty crops could no longer be produced in the US or would be greatly compromised in cost and quality.

This project?s objectives for minor and specialty crops are to obtain pesticide clearances for food uses, further the development and adoption of biopesticides, and conduct research to protect ornamental crops.

There are five (5) regions that can apply for IR-4 funding and five (5) awards are made. (F) Special Research Grants Program Potato Breeding Research: All four (4) awards made in FY 2017 will be awarded continuation funding in FY 2018. (H) Special Research Grants Program Aquaculture Research (aka Aquaculture Centers): The Aquaculture Research Special Research Grants program will likely not be included in the President?s FY 2018 budget.

However, if it is included in the final appropriation for FY 2018, pertinent details will be provided by Program at a future date. (I) Supplemental and Alternative Crops Competitive Grants Program (aka Canola Research and SACC): Data is not yet available.

Pertinent data will be provided by program at a future date.


Agency - Department of Agriculture

Established in 1862, the Department of Agriculture serves all Americans through anti-hunger efforts, stewardship of nearly 200 million acres of national forest and rangelands, and through product safety and conservation efforts. The USDA opens markets for American farmers and ranchers and provides food for needy people around the world.

Office - None.

Section # 153 - Additional Websites: http://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/minor-crop-pest-management-program-interregional-research-project-4-ir-4 http://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/potato-breeding-research http://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/special-research-grants-program-aquaculture-research http://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/supplemental-and-alternative-crops-sacc.

Relevant Nonprofit Program Categories





Selected Recipients for this Program


RecipientAmount Start DateEnd Date
Iowa State University Of Science And Technology $ 929,280   2018-09-012023-08-31
University Of Hawaii Systems $ 929,280   2018-09-012022-08-31
University Of Maryland $ 929,280   2018-09-012022-08-31
Mississippi State University $ 929,280   2018-09-012022-08-31
University Of Washington $ 929,280   2018-09-012021-08-31
Hawaii Pacific University $ 743,424   2016-09-012021-08-31
Iowa State University Of Science And Technology $ 739,960   2016-09-012021-08-31
University Of Washington $ 743,424   2016-09-012021-08-31
Mississippi State University $ 739,960   2016-09-012021-08-31
University Of Maryland $ 743,424   2016-09-012021-08-31



Program Accomplishments

Fiscal Year 2016: The following represents accomplishments for active Programs: (B) Global Change Ultraviolet Radiation Monitoring and Research Program (GC/UV-B): The program made one (1) competitive award to operate and manage USDA?s ultraviolet radiation climatology network, and to conduct, in collaboration with another institution, research on ultraviolet radiation effects on agriculturally relevant crops and integration of crop models. Coupling with economic models, effects research and simulations enable us to project regional and national climate change impacts on agriculture. The program maintained high data collection rates, model runs were made for corn, and work with crop simulations continues. Economic analysis modules have been coupled with the integrated assessment framework. The amount available to fund proposals was $1,305,147. (D) Minor Crop Pest Management Program Interregional Research Project #4: Applications were received from four (4) regional centers and the National Headquarters Office. A diverse panel reviewed the applications and recommended funding each of the proposals received. A total of five (5) awards were made. Funds support research on pesticides for use in specialty crops and minor crops. (F) Special Research Grants Program Potato Breeding Research: For the Fiscal Year (FY) 2016 grant cycle, $1,848,966 was available to fund proposals submitted to this program. In 2016, four (4) proposals were submitted and they were reviewed in the same panel with canola proposals. There were ten (10) panelists. Funds were available to support all four (4) awards. The funding ratio for this program is 100%. Funded projects will support potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) research that focuses on the development and testing of superior potato varieties for commercial production. (H) Special Research Grants Program Aquaculture Research (aka Aquaculture Centers): The Fiscal Year (FY) 2016 Aquaculture Research Special Research Grants program panel met from July 12-14. A total of 56 proposals were received. Four (4) awards were made. The total amount of $1,236,969 available to fund these four (4) proposals. (I) Supplemental and Alternative Crops Competitive Grants Program (aka Canola Research and SACC): For the Fiscal Year (FY) 2016 award cycle, $767,790 was available to fund the proposals received by this program. The maximum award was $195,000. Ten (10) applications were received, a total of $ 2,010,087 was requested for the FY 2016 competition. On June 6, 2016, a seven (7) member peer review panel evaluated the applications. The peer panel included faculty from 1862 and 1890 land-grant institutions (LGIs), and Federal and industry scientists. Funds were available to support a total of four (4) awards. The funding rate was 40%. Funded projects will develop canola as a viable supplemental and alternative crop in the United States. They are supporting integrated research and extension projects that focus on developing and testing superior canola germplasm; improving methods of planting, cultivation and harvesting; and transferring the new knowledge to producers. These projects involved stakeholders in priority setting, project development and implementation; and included multi-state cooperation. The funded projects will complement research being conducted by the U. S. Department of Agriculture?s Agricultural Research Service (ARS). The following Programs are no longer funded: hence, no action is required: (A) Expert IPM Decision Support Systems (C ) Integrated Pest Management & Biological Control (Special Research Grants): (E) Pest Management Alternatives (PMAP): (G) Critical Agricultural Materials: (J) Policy Research Centers (aka Agriculture and Rural Policy Research): (K) McIntire-Stennis Cooperative Forestry Research aka Rangeland Research Program (L) Forest Products Research Grants Program: (M) Minor Use Animal Drugs: (N) National Biological Impact Assessment Program: (R) Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (SNAP & EFNEP): Regional Nutrition Education and Obesity Prevention Centers of Excellence (RNECE):. Fiscal Year 2017: The following represents accomplishments for active Programs: (B) Global Change Ultraviolet Radiation Monitoring and Research Program (GC/UV-B): The program is in process of making one (1) continuation award to Colorado State University. The PIs operated and managed USDA?s ultraviolet radiation climatology network, and conducted, in collaboration with other institutions, research on ultraviolet radiation effects on agriculturally relevant crops. Projection of regional and national climate change impacts on cotton/maize/soybeans using economic models, effects research, and simulations continued. Anticipate that greater emphasis will be placed on modeling and simulation portions of the grant for remainder of the FY in response to panel comments and site visit conducted in FY 2016. The amount available to fund proposals is $1,302,426. (D) Minor Crop Pest Management Program Interregional Research Project #4: Applications are from four (4) regional centers and the National Headquarters Office. A diverse panel reviewed the applications and recommend funding accordingly. A total of five (5) awards were made. Funds support research on pesticides for use in specialty crops and minor crops. The program will support the plant protection industry to develop registrations for specialty crop chemicals, IR-4 develops the data that support legal, effective, safe and IPM-compatible pest control agents for minor and specialty crops. This project?s objectives for minor and specialty crops are to obtain pesticide clearances for food uses, further the development and adoption of bio-pesticides, and conduct research to protect ornamental crops. There are five (5) regions that can apply for IR-4 funding. The Request for Applications (RFA) was published with a closing date of May 1, 2017. A total of five (5) applications were received and subjected to the peer panel review process. Five (5) awards made, representing a 100% success rate. (F) Special Research Grants Program Potato Breeding Research: For the Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 funding cycle, approximately $2,077,895 was available to fund proposals submitted to this program. Five (5) proposals were submitted to the program. One (1) was rejected for lack of program fit. Thus, four (4) were reviewed by a panel of five (5) reviewers. Funded projects will support potato research that has a high potential to develop potato varieties with a high value to the potato industry. (H) Special Research Grants Program Aquaculture Research (aka Aquaculture Centers): The Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 Aquaculture Research Special Research Grants program panel met from July 17-19. A total of 54 proposals were received. Four (4) proposals will be funded. There was approximately $1,216,344 million available for these awards. (I) Supplemental and Alternative Crops Competitive Grants Program (aka Canola Research and SACC): For the Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 award cycle, approximately $765,906 is available to fund proposals received by this program. Maximum award size is $325,500. Seven (7) applications were received, a total of $ 1,397,133 was requested for the FY 2017 competition. On June 22, 2017, an eight (8) member peer review panel evaluated the applications. The peer panel included faculty from 1862 land-grant institutions (LGIs), and Federal and industry scientists. Funded projects will support integrated research and extension projects that focus on developing and testing superior canola germplasm; improving methods of planting, cultivation and harvesting; and transferring the new knowledge to producers. Fiscal Year 2018: The following represents accomplishments for active Programs: (B) Global Change Ultraviolet Radiation Monitoring and Research Program (GC/UV-B): The program will make one (1) continuation award for the institution to continue operation and management USDA?s ultraviolet radiation climatology network, and to conduct, in collaboration with the other institutions, research on ultraviolet radiation effects on agriculturally relevant crops. Projection of regional and national climate change impacts on cotton/maize/soybeans using economic models, effects research, and simulations will continue. Due to requested increase in emphasis of crop and economic modeling, site visits to both collaborative Universities [one (1) involved with the crop modeling effort and one (1) involved with economic modeling] are to be made. It is projected that the amount to fund proposals for FY 2018 is zero ($0). (D) Minor Crop Pest Management Program Interregional Research Project #4: For the Fiscal Year (FY) 2018 award cycle, it is anticipated that approximately $11,000,000 will be available to fund proposals. Applications are expected from four (4) regional centers and the National Headquarters Office. A diverse panel will review the applications and recommend funding accordingly. A total of five (5) awards may be made. Funds support research on pesticides for use in specialty crops and minor crops. It is anticipated that the awards made in FY 2017 will be continuations in FY 2018. (F) Special Research Grants Program Potato Breeding Research: All four (4) awards made in FY 2017 will be awarded continuation funding in FY 2018. (H) Special Research Grants Program Aquaculture Research (aka Aquaculture Centers): It is anticipated that the Aquaculture Research Special Research Grants Program will not be included in the President?s Fiscal Year (FY) 2018 budget request. However, if funded in FY 2018, it is anticipated that an amount similar to the FY 2017 levels ($1.35 million, appropriated) will be made available for this program with approximately 55 proposals submitted for funding. If funded, it is anticipated that approximately $1.2 will be available for four (4) awards of approximately $300,000 each. It is projected that similar projects will be supported in FY 2018. (I) Supplemental and Alternative Crops Competitive Grants Program (aka Canola Research and SACC): Program is subject to congressional budget approval for FY 2018. At this time, the projected funding level is Zero ($0).

Uses and Use Restrictions

Grant funds must be used for allowable costs necessary to conduct approved fundamental and applied research, extension and education objectives to address food and agricultural sciences.

Awards are generally limited to high priority problems of a regional or national scope.

NIFA has determined that grant funds awarded under this authority may not be used for the renovation or refurbishment of research, education, or extension space; the purchase or installation of fixed equipment in such space; or the planning, repair, rehabilitation, acquisition, or construction of buildings or facilities. Funds may not be used for any purposes other than those approved in the grant award documents. Funds shall not be used for tuition remission. Indirect Costs are generally not allowable for this program.

Generally, there are no matching requirements associated with Special Research Grant programs and matching resources will not be factored into the review process as evaluation criteria. Please refer to RFA, Part IV.D.

? Applications ? Funding Restrictions for specific details. Exceptions to the general rules, as related to Indirect Cost and matching requirements, are indicated below, as deemed appropriate and necessary. The following programs are EXCEPTIONS to the general rules: (1) Critical Agricultural Materials (Pub.

L.

95-592) (2) Federal Administration - Research (3) Pest Management Alternatives (aka PMAP) (4) Supplemental and Alternative Crops [ 7 U.S.C.

3319d (c)]. (5) Policy Research Centers (Section 1419A of 7 U.S.C.

3155) and (6) Rangeland Research For the above-referenced EXCEPTIONS to the general rule, [i.e.

#'s (1) thru (5)], the following provisions are applicable: Section 720 of the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2012 (Pub.L.

No.

112-55) limits indirect costs to 30 percent of the total Federal funds provided under each award.

Therefore, when preparing budgets, applicants should limit their requests for recovery of indirect costs to the lesser of their institution?s official negotiated indirect cost rate or the equivalent of 30 percent of total Federal funds awarded.

Therefore, when preparing budgets, applicants should limit their requests for recovery of indirect costs to the lesser of their institution?s official negotiated indirect cost rate or the equivalent of 30 percent of total Federal funds awarded. Special Note on Indirect Costs as in-kind matching contributions: Indirect costs may be claimed under the Federal portion of the award budget or, alternatively, indirect costs may be claimed as a matching contribution (if no indirect costs are requested under the Federal portion of the award budget).

However, unless explicitly authorized in the RFA, indirect costs may not be claimed on both the Federal portion of the award budget and as a matching contribution, unless the total claimed on both the Federal portion of the award budget and as a matching contribution does not exceed the maximum allowed indirect costs or the institution?s negotiated indirect cost rate, whichever is less.

An awardee may split the allocation between the Federal and non-Federal portions of the budget only if the total amount of indirect costs charged to the project does not exceed the maximum allowed indirect costs or the institution?s negotiated indirect cost rate, whichever is less.

For example, if an awardees' indirect costs are capped at 30 percent pursuant to FY 2012 appropriated funds, Section 720 of the Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2012 (Division A of Pub.

L.

112-55), the awardee may request 15 percent of the indirect costs on both the Federal portion of the award and as a matching contribution.

Or, the awardee may request any similar percentage that, when combined, does not exceed the maximum indirect cost rate of 30 percent. Exception # 6: For the Rangeland Research program the following provisions are applicable: Per 7 CFR 3401.5, Indirect Cost is allowable if the award is made to a Federal lab. Pursuant to Section 1480 of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977 as amended [7 USC 3333(b)(1)], applicants are required to provide 50 percent matching funds from non-federal sources for all proposed Federal funds sought in the application.

Non-federal matching contributions, such as cash and third party in kind, are accepted under this program as qualified by 7 USC 3015 and 7 USC 3019.

Foregone indirect costs cannot be used as part of the required match.

Fully discretionary.

Eligibility Requirements

Applicant Eligibility

Special Research Grants: State agricultural experiment stations, all colleges and universities, other research institutions and organizations, Federal agencies, private organizations or corporations and individuals having a demonstrable capacity to conduct research activities to facilitate or expand promising breakthroughs in areas of the food and agricultural sciences of importance to the United States.

Beneficiary Eligibility

For Special Research Grants: State agricultural experiment stations, all colleges and universities, other research institutions and organizations, Federal agencies, private organizations or corporations and individuals having a demonstrable capacity to conduct research activities to facilitate or expand promising breakthroughs in areas of the food and agricultural sciences of importance to the United States.

Credentials/Documentation

The System for Award Management (SAM) combines eight federal procurement systems, including CCR, and the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance into one new system. CCR activities are conducted through SAM (the CCR website will redirect users to SAM). Dun and Bradstreet Universal Numbering System (DUNS) Number and System for Award Management (SAM): Each applicant (unless excepted under 2 CFR § 25.110(b) or (c), or has an exception approved by the Federal awarding agency under 2 CFR § 25.110(d)) is required to: (i) Be registered in SAM before submitting its application; (ii) Provide a valid DUNS number in its application; and (iii) Continue to maintain an active SAM registration with current information at all times during which it has an active Federal award or an application or plan under consideration by a Federal awarding agency. It also must state that the Federal awarding agency may not make a Federal award to an applicant until the applicant has complied with all applicable DUNS and SAM requirements and, if an applicant has not fully complied with the requirements by the time the Federal awarding agency is ready to make a Federal award, the Federal awarding agency may determine that the applicant is not qualified to receive a Federal award and use that determination as a basis for making a Federal award to another applicant. Applicants must furnish the information required in the Competitive Request for Applications (RFAs). Successful applicants recommended for funding must furnish the information and assurances requested during the award documentation process. These include, but are not limited to the following: Organizational Management Information - Specific management information relating to an applicant shall be submitted on a one time basis, with updates on an as needed basis, as part of the responsibility determination prior to the award of a grant identified under this RFA, if such information has not been provided previously under this or another NIFA program. NIFA will provide copies of forms recommended for use in fulfilling these requirements as part of the preaward process. Although an applicant may be eligible based on its status as one of these entities, there are factors which may exclude an applicant from receiving Federal financial and nonfinancial assistance and benefits under this program (e.g., debarment or suspension of an individual involved or a determination that an applicant is not responsible based on submitted organizational management information). This information collection is approved under OMB Circular Control No. 0524-0026, ?Assurance of Compliance with the Department of Agriculture Regulations Assuring Civil Rights, Compliance and Organization Information.? SPECIAL NOTE: Please refer to the Competitive Request for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details. The most current RFAs are available as follows: Global Change Ultraviolet Radiation Monitoring and Research Program (GC/UV-B): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/global-change-ultraviolet-radiation-monitoring-and-research-program Minor Crop Pest Management Program Interregional Research Project (IR-4): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/minor-crop-pest-management-program-interregional-research-project-4-ir-4 Special Research Grants Program Potato Breeding Research: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/potato-breeding-research Special Research Grants Program Aquaculture Research (aka Aquaculture Centers): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/special-research-grants-program-aquaculture-research Supplemental and Alternative Crops Competitive Grants Program (SACC): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/supplemental-and-alternative-crops-sacc RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Competitive RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database. 2 CFR 200, Subpart E - Cost Principles applies to this program.

Aplication and Award Process

Preapplication Coordination

All RFAs are published on the Agency?s website and Grants.gov.

Applicants must complete the Grants.gov registration process.

Please see the following Grants.gov link for more information: http://www.grants.gov/applicants/get_registered.jsp.

An environmental impact statement is required for this program.

This program is excluded from coverage under E.O.

12372.

Application Procedures

2 CFR 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards applies to this program. The National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) only accepts electronic applications which are submitted via Grants.gov in response to specific Requests for Applications (RFA). Applicants must complete the Grants.gov registration process. For information about the pre-award phase of the grant lifecycle application processes see: http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/learn-grants/grants-101/pre-award-phase.html. Further, applicants must follow the instructions provided in the NIFA Grants.gov Application Guide, which can be assessed as follows: Adobe NIFA Applications. 2 CFR part 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards and 2 CFR part 400 USDA?s Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards apply to this program. SPECIAL NOTE: Please refer to the Competitive Request for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details. The most current RFAs are available as follows: Global Change Ultraviolet Radiation Monitoring and Research Program (GC/UV-B): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/global-change-ultraviolet-radiation-monitoring-and-research-program Minor Crop Pest Management Program Interregional Research Project (IR-4): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/minor-crop-pest-management-program-interregional-research-project-4-ir-4 Special Research Grants Program Potato Breeding Research: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/potato-breeding-research Special Research Grants Program Aquaculture Research (aka Aquaculture Centers): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/special-research-grants-program-aquaculture-research Supplemental and Alternative Crops Competitive Grants Program (SACC): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/supplemental-and-alternative-crops-sacc RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Competitive RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database.

Award Procedures

Applications are subjected to a system of peer and merit review in accordance with section 103 of the Agricultural Research, Extension and Education Reform Act of 1998 (7 U.S.C. 7613) by a panel of qualified scientists and other appropriate persons who are specialists in the field covered by the proposal. Within the limit of funds available for such purpose, the NIFA Authorized Departmental Officer (ADO) shall make grants to those responsible, eligible applicants whose applications are judged most meritorious under the procedures set forth in the RFA. Reviewers will be selected based upon training and experience in relevant scientific, extension, or education fields, taking into account the following factors: (a) The level of relevant formal scientific, technical education, or extension experience of the individual, as well as the extent to which an individual is engaged in relevant research, education, or extension activities; (b) the need to include as reviewers experts from various areas of specialization within relevant scientific, education, or extension fields; (c) the need to include as reviewers other experts (e.g., producers, range or forest managers/operators, and consumers) who can assess relevance of the applications to targeted audiences and to program needs; (d) the need to include as reviewers experts from a variety of organizational types (e.g., colleges, universities, industry, state and Federal agencies, private profit and non-profit organizations) and geographic locations; (e) the need to maintain a balanced composition of reviewers with regard to minority and female representation and an equitable age distribution; and (f) the need to include reviewers who can judge the effective usefulness to producers and the general public of each application. Evaluation Criteria will be delineated in the Competitive Request for Applications (RFA). 2 CFR 200 ? Subpart C and Appendix I and 2 CFR part 400 apply to this Program. SPECIAL NOTE: Please refer to the Competitive Request for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details. The most current RFAs are available as follows: Global Change Ultraviolet Radiation Monitoring and Research Program (GC/UV-B): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/global-change-ultraviolet-radiation-monitoring-and-research-program Minor Crop Pest Management Program Interregional Research Project (IR-4): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/minor-crop-pest-management-program-interregional-research-project-4-ir-4 Special Research Grants Program Potato Breeding Research: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/potato-breeding-research Special Research Grants Program Aquaculture Research (aka Aquaculture Centers): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/special-research-grants-program-aquaculture-research Supplemental and Alternative Crops Competitive Grants Program (SACC): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/supplemental-and-alternative-crops-sacc RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Competitive RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database.

Deadlines

Contact the headquarters or regional office, as appropriate, for application deadlines.

Authorization

Section 2 (c), Public Law 89-106, 7 U.S.C. 450i(c), as amended.

Range of Approval/Disapproval Time

Section :094 - Deadlines: Specific deadline dates are announced on the Agency?s website: http://www.nifa.usda.gov Contact the headquarters, as appropriate, for application deadlines. See Section : 152 for specific details. Further, dates for specific deadlines are announced in the RFA each fiscal year. Section :095 - Range of Approval/Disapproval Time: From 30 to 180 days. Contact the National Program Leader (NPL), as indicated per CFDA Section # 152 ? Headquarters Office regarding dates for specific deadlines, start and end dates, and range of approval/disapproval time. Information is also available via our website and may be obtained via the Grants.gov website. NIFA?s respective links regarding general information are provided below: http://nifa.usda.gov/ http://www.grants.gov. SPECIAL NOTE: Please refer to the Competitive Request for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details. The most current RFAs are available as follows: Global Change Ultraviolet Radiation Monitoring and Research Program (GC/UV-B): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/global-change-ultraviolet-radiation-monitoring-and-research-program Minor Crop Pest Management Program Interregional Research Project (IR-4): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/minor-crop-pest-management-program-interregional-research-project-4-ir-4 Special Research Grants Program Potato Breeding Research: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/potato-breeding-research Special Research Grants Program Aquaculture Research (aka Aquaculture Centers): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/special-research-grants-program-aquaculture-research Supplemental and Alternative Crops Competitive Grants Program (SACC): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/supplemental-and-alternative-crops-sacc RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Competitive RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database.

Appeals

Not Applicable. 2 CFR Part 200 ? Subparts D & E apply to this program.

Renewals

Specific details are provided in the Request for Applications (RFA), which are generally published annually. The most current RFAs are available as follows: Global Change Ultraviolet Radiation Monitoring and Research Program (GC/UV-B): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/global-change-ultraviolet-radiation-monitoring-and-research-program Minor Crop Pest Management Program Interregional Research Project (IR-4): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/minor-crop-pest-management-program-interregional-research-project-4-ir-4 Special Research Grants Program Potato Breeding Research: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/potato-breeding-research Special Research Grants Program Aquaculture Research (aka Aquaculture Centers): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/special-research-grants-program-aquaculture-research Supplemental and Alternative Crops Competitive Grants Program (SACC): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/supplemental-and-alternative-crops-sacc.

Assistance Considerations

Formula and Matching Requirements

This program has no statutory formula. This program has no matching requirements. Funds are awarded competitively. No formula grants are awarded under Subtitle K of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977 [7 U.S.C. 3319e]. Generally, NIFA does NOT require matching or cost sharing support for this program. However, the Rangeland Research Program is an EXCEPTION to the general rule. The following represents pertinent information regarding the Rangeland Research Program [ 7 U.S.C. 3333(a)(1)]: Pursuant to Section 1480 of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977 as amended [7 USC 3333(b)(1)], applicants are required to provide 50 percent matching funds from non-federal sources for all proposed Federal funds sought in the application. Non-federal matching contributions, such as cash and third party in kind, are accepted under this program as qualified by 7 USC 3015 and 7 USC 3019. MOE requirements are not applicable to this program.

Length and Time Phasing of Assistance

In accordance with statutory time limits, project periods, including no-cost extensions of time, are not to exceed three (3) years. Further details are provided in the Award document Form NIFA-2009 and the NIFA General Terms and Conditions Grants and Cooperative Agreements (dated October 2016) at: https://nifa.usda.gov/resource/nifa-general-terms-and-conditions-grants-and-cooperative-agreements-october-2016. SPECIAL NOTE: Please refer to the Competitive Request for Applications (RFAs) for specific and pertinent details. The most current RFAs are available as follows: Global Change Ultraviolet Radiation Monitoring and Research Program (GC/UV-B): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/global-change-ultraviolet-radiation-monitoring-and-research-program Minor Crop Pest Management Program Interregional Research Project (IR-4): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/minor-crop-pest-management-program-interregional-research-project-4-ir-4 Special Research Grants Program Potato Breeding Research: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/potato-breeding-research Special Research Grants Program Aquaculture Research (aka Aquaculture Centers): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/special-research-grants-program-aquaculture-research Supplemental and Alternative Crops Competitive Grants Program (SACC): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/supplemental-and-alternative-crops-sacc RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Competitive RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database. See the following for information on how assistance is awarded/released: NIFA utilizes the Automated Standard Application for Payments (ASAP), a secure, web-based electronic payment and information system that allows federal agencies to administer funds. Currently, ASAP is the only payment source for new NIFA grantees.

Post Assistance Requirements

Reports

REEport GRANT REPORTING: All grant reporting must be completed using the Research, Education, and Extension project online reporting tool (REEport).

Initial reporting (item a.

below) is to be submitted through the REEport system.

Annual progress and final reporting (items b.

and c.

below) also is to be done through the REEport system.

Information on REEport can be found on NIFA?s web site at https://nifa.usda.gov/tool/reeport and the REEport software can be found at http://portal.nifa.usda.gov.

a.

Initial Documentation in the REEport Database-- Research, Education, and Extension project online reporting tool (REEport) All projects must be documented in REEport.

The NIFA contact for all REEport documentation is: REEport National Institute of Food and Agriculture U.S.

Department of Agriculture STOP 2213 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, D.C.

20250-2213 Telephone: (202) 690-0009 E-mail: electronic@nifa.usda.gov b.

Annual Progress Reports. All projects must report annually into REEport.

An annual Progress Report is due 90 calendar days after the award?s anniversary date (i.e., one year following the month and day of which the project period begins and each year thereafter up until a final report is required).

An annual Progress Report covers the most recent one-year period.

The following information, when applicable, must be included in the Project Modifications section of the annual Progress Report. 1) A comparison of actual accomplishments with the goals established for the reporting period (where the output of the project can be expressed readily in numbers, a computation of the cost per unit of output should be submitted if the information is considered useful); (2) The reasons for slippage if established goals were not met; and (3) Additional pertinent information including, when appropriate, analysis and explanation of cost overruns or unexpectedly high unit costs. c.

Final Technical Report The Final Technical Report is required within 90 calendar days after the expiration or termination of the award.

The Final Technical Report covers the entire period of performance of the award and must describe progress made during the entire timeframe of the project instead of covering accomplishments made only during the final reporting segment of the project.

In addition to supplying the information required under item b.

of this article, the final report must include the following when applicable: Identify equipment purchased with any Federal funds under the award and indicate subsequent use of such equipment. FINANCIAL REPORTING: As outlined in 2 CFR 200.327, the recipient must submit financial status reports by the frequency required in the terms and conditions of the award.

The following are the financial reporting requirements for NIFA. Federal Financial Report, Form SF-425: NIFA uses the SF-425, Federal Financial Report to monitor cash.

A ?Federal Financial Report,? Form SF-425, is due on an annual basis no later than 90 days following the end of the award anniversary date (i.e., one year following the month and day when the project period begins and each year thereafter up until a final report is required).

An annual Progress Report covers the most recent one-year period.

A final ?Federal Financial Report,? Form SF-425, is due 90 days after the expiration date of this award.

The report must be submitted to the Awards Management Division (AMD) as a pdf attachment to an email sent to awards@nifa.usda.gov. If questions are encountered regarding financial reporting requirements, please contact: Awards Management Division (AMD) Office of Grants and Financial Management (OGFM) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) U.S.

Department of Agriculture (USDA) STOP 2271 1400 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20250-2271 Telephone: (202) 401-4986 SPECIAL NOTES: (1) Refer to the Competitive Requests for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details.

RFAs are generally released annually and provide the most current and accurate information available.

Any specific instructions in the Competitive RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database. (2) The details of the reporting requirements are included in the NIFA General Terms and Conditions Grants and Cooperative Agreements (dated October 2016). (3) Further guidance is provided under 2 CFR Part 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards and 2 CFR Part 400, USDA?s Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards.

No cash reports are required.

PROGRESS REPORTS: See above for pertinent and specific details.

EXPENDITURE REPORTS: See above for pertinent and specific details.

PERFORMANCE MONITORING: See above for pertinent and specific details.

Audits

In accordance with the provisions of 2 CFR 200, Subpart F - Audit Requirements, non-Federal entities that expend financial assistance of $750,000 or more in Federal awards will have a single or a program-specific audit conducted for that year. Non-Federal entities that expend less than $750,000 a year in Federal awards are exempt from Federal audit requirements for that year, except as noted in 2 CFR 200.503. Relation to other audit requirements, but records must be available for review or audit by appropriate officials of the Federal agency, pass-through entity, and Government Accountability Office (GAO). This program is also subject to audit by the cognizant Federal audit agency and the USDA Office of Inspector General.

Records

In accordance with 2 CFR Part 400 - Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards, § 200.333 Retention requirements for records. Grantees shall maintain separate records for each grant to ensure that funds are used for authorized purposes. Grant-related records are subject to inspection during the life of the grant and must be retained at least three (3) years. Records must be retained beyond the three (3) year period if litigation is pending or audit findings have not been resolved. 2 CFR Part 200, Subpart D applies to this program.

Financial Information

Account Identification

12-1500-0-1-352.

Obigations

(Project Grants) FY 16 $20,712,503; FY 17 est $21,010,272; and FY 18 est $11,748,689 - The difference between the appropriation and obligation numbers reflects legislative authorized set-asides deducted as appropriate, and in some cases the availability of obligational authority from prior years. SPECIAL NOTE: The FY 2018 amount is substantially less than for prior years. Several Programs have been eliminated in the President's FY 2018 budget. NOTES: In FY 2014, various Pest Management Programs are consolidated under Integrated Activities, Crop Protection/Pest Management Program. Obligations for the Forest Products and Potato Breeding Research Programs are reported under Other Special Research Grants.

Range and Average of Financial Assistance

If minimum or maximum amounts of funding per competitive and/or capacity project grant, or cooperative agreement are established, these amounts will be announced in the annual Competitive Request for Application (RFA). The most current RFAs are available as follows: Global Change Ultraviolet Radiation Monitoring and Research Program (GC/UV-B): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/global-change-ultraviolet-radiation-monitoring-and-research-program Minor Crop Pest Management Program Interregional Research Project (IR-4): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/minor-crop-pest-management-program-interregional-research-project-4-ir-4 Special Research Grants Program Potato Breeding Research: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/potato-breeding-research Special Research Grants Program Aquaculture Research (aka Aquaculture Centers): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/special-research-grants-program-aquaculture-research Supplemental and Alternative Crops Competitive Grants Program (SACC): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/supplemental-and-alternative-crops-sacc.

Regulations, Guidelines, and Literature

As an administrator of U.S. government support, NIFA works in partnership with grantees to ensure responsible stewardship of federal funds. Our grantees and partners are required to comply with all relevant rules and regulations. The following resources are provided to NIFA?s partners and award recipients to support their adherence to federal regulations governing program performance: NIFA?s primary (main) website: https://nifa.usda.gov/regulations-and-guidelines The following represent specific documents and direct links: POLICY GUIDE NIFA?s Federal Assistance Policy Guide describes agency policies and procedures. https://nifa.usda.gov/policy-guide CERTIFICATIONS AND REPRESENTATIONS Certifications and representations provided through the NIFA application process. https://nifa.usda.gov/certifications-and-representations ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF USDA SUPPORT BY NIFA When acknowledging USDA support in accordance with 2 CFR Part 415, grantees must use the following acknowledgement for all projects or initiatives supported by NIFA. https://nifa.usda.gov/acknowledgment-usda-support-nifa FEDERAL REGULATIONS The Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) lists all regulations published in the Federal Register. https://nifa.usda.gov/federal-regulations FOIA The Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) provides that any person has the right to request access to federal documents and information such as research data. https://nifa.usda.gov/foia NEPA POLICY AND GUIDANCE The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Policy and Guidance set the standard for identifying potential environmental impacts. https://nifa.usda.gov/nepa-policy-and-guidance OGFM ISSUED CORRESPONDENCE The Office of Grants and Financial Management occasionally issues correspondence to applicants, grantees, and/or the general public for informational or clarification purposes. https://nifa.usda.gov/ogfm-issued-correspondence RESEARCH MISCONDUCT NIFA requires that all its awardees adhere to the USDA Scientific Integrity Policy and the Federal Policy on Research Misconduct. https://nifa.usda.gov/research-misconduct NIFA?S GENERAL AWARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS Award terms and conditions are determined by statutory, regulatory, and agency requirements, as well as each grant?s circumstances. Terms and conditions dictate important items related to your grant, including method of payment, reporting frequency and content, and prior approval requirements. References to the terms and conditions of awards are located on the NIFA 2009 Award Fact Sheet. NIFA's general award terms and conditions (see link below) is applicable to this program, for awards with an award date on December 26, 2014 and thereafter. https://nifa.usda.gov/resource/nifa-general-terms-and-conditions-grants-and-cooperative-agreements-october-2016.

Information Contacts

Regional or Local Office

None. Section # 153 - Additional Websites: http://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/minor-crop-pest-management-program-interregional-research-project-4-ir-4 http://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/potato-breeding-research http://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/special-research-grants-program-aquaculture-research http://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/supplemental-and-alternative-crops-sacc.

Headquarters Office

USDA, NIFA, National Program Leader, Institute of Food Production and Sustainability, Division of Plant Systems-Protection, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., STOP 2240, Telephone: (202) 401-4939, Fax: (202) 1782. ADDITIONAL CONTACT: USDA, NIFA, National Program Leader, Institute of Bioenergy, Climate, and Environment, Division of Bioenergy, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., STOP 2210, Washington, District of Columbia, 20250-2210 , Telephone: (202) 401-5244, Fax: (202) 401-2653. E-mail: policy@nifa.usda.gov., Washington , District of Columbia 20250-2240 Email: Policy@nifa.usda.gov Phone: (202) 401-4939

Criteria for Selecting Proposals

2 CFR part 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards and 2 CFR part 400 USDA?s Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards apply to this program. Within guidelines established for the program as described in the Competitive Request for Application (RFA). The most current RFAs are available as follows: Global Change Ultraviolet Radiation Monitoring and Research Program (GC/UV-B): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/global-change-ultraviolet-radiation-monitoring-and-research-program Minor Crop Pest Management Program Interregional Research Project (IR-4): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/minor-crop-pest-management-program-interregional-research-project-4-ir-4 Special Research Grants Program Potato Breeding Research: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/potato-breeding-research Special Research Grants Program Aquaculture Research (aka Aquaculture Centers): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/special-research-grants-program-aquaculture-research Supplemental and Alternative Crops Competitive Grants Program (SACC): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/supplemental-and-alternative-crops-sacc.



Social Entrepreneurship
Spotlight



Social Enterprises Address Housing Crises


Social Enterprises Address Housing Crises

Funding for social enterprises and housing associations are extremely lacking. Nick O’Donohoe, Chief Executive, Big Society Capital points out that there is a need to “build bigger, more stronger, more resilient social enterprises” because they are “critical to growth and prosperity and quality of life in our community.”




Social Services Jobs in Wisconsin

  Executive Director Jobs
  Social Services Jobs
  Social Services Employment
  Social Work Jobs
  Executive Director Jobs





More Federal Domestic Assistance Programs


Education and Prevention Grants to Reduce Sexual Abuse of Runaway, Homeless and Street Youth | Research Innovation and Development Grants in Economic (RIDGE) | YouthBuild | Agricultural Management Assistance | Noninsured Assistance |  Site Style by YAML | Grants.gov | Grants | Grants News | Sitemap | Privacy Policy


Edited by: Michael Saunders

© 2004-2019 Copyright Michael Saunders