Community Food Projects

To support the development of community food projects designed to meet the food needs of low-income people; increase the self-reliance of communities in providing for their own needs; and promote comprehensive responses to local food, farm, and nutrition issues.

credit: Flickr



Related Programs

Examples of Funded Projects

Fiscal Year 2016: The MPS Farm Project and The Farm at Nellie Stone The MPS Farm Project is a model for engaging students, teachers and the community in growing food and building healthy food skills.

Youth Farm, along with our key partners Minneapolis Public Schools Culinary & Nutrition Services (MPS) and Nellie Stone Johnson Community School (NSJ) are partnering to focus on four (4) goals: (1) Increase understanding of food production and nutrition among youth and teachers through agricultural education, classroom lessons and school meals; (2) Increase community understanding of food production, purchasing and preparation through nutrition education and engagement in the farm project to support community health and self-reliance; (3) Increase access to diverse, healthy food options in order to support healthy Minneapolis communities; and (4) Create a scalable and replicable partnership model for supporting school communities in food, nutrition, youth development and agricultural education.

The MPS Farm Project and The Farm at Nellie Stone will be developed over the course of five (5) years, engaging students and teachers at NSJ, teachers and school garden coordinators throughout the MPS district, Youth Farm, youth, and community members from Hawthorne and surrounding neighborhoods.

These partners will collaboratively build a 23-acre farm and outdoor education space, including a greenhouse and hoop house, creating food access and developing a model for partner schools that connects the farm, the cafeteria, and the classroom through experiential education that aligns with MPS standards and Youth Farm?s youth development model. Integrating Workforce Training For Foster Youth With A Community Food Web: Culinary Arts, Agriculture, and Nutrition (I-Can) The proposed project is designed to develop and maintain a network of services to assist young adults recently emancipated from the foster care system, and brings together the resources of a large comprehensive university, an arboretum, a non-profit social enterprise, and a NIFA-funded community-based education and research project.

The goals of the program are to: (1) to increase knowledge and skills of sustainable urban agriculture,; (2) increase knowledge and practice of Dietary Guidelines for Americans in coordination with increasing culinary skills; (3) to develop business and entrepreneurial skills through the creation, testing, and sale of value-added products based on fruits and vegetables from the arboretum; and (4) to embed community-based research into the evaluation of the program. Healthy Here: Bernalillo County Community Food Projects And Mobile Food Market Presbyterian Healthcare Services will serve as the backbone agency for a collective impact partnership to address food insecurity and health disparities in Bernalillo County, New Mexico.

Organization partners include Agri-Cultura Network, Adelante, Kids Cook!, Street Food Institute, and First Choice Community Healthcare.

Partners along with a community-based Governance Committee will plan and carry out a four-year project incorporating a Mobile Food Market that sells locally grown produce and integrates outreach and education about cooking, nutrition, and gardening.

Target beneficiaries are low-income residents of the South Valley and the International District.

Residents here face challenges affording healthy produce and may not have ready transportation to reach the limited number of supermarkets and other retailers selling produce.

The Mobile Food Market will stop at points of community intersection like schools, clinics, and senior centers.

Programming also includes public workshops about gardening and food and a train-the trainer model to produce Community Food Leaders.

The project will also employ area residents as trained Community Food Educators.

Project goals include increasing access to nutritious food among low-income residents; developing local leadership and food security; supporting local farming of high-value crops and agricultural economic development; improving healthy eating and reducing area health disparities; and strengthening linkages between agricultural, entrepreneurial, health, and human service sectors to create a vibrant local food economy. Rebuilding Local Food Systems in Farmworker Communities Project The Farmworker Association of Florida, a community-based organization, proposes to expand its Rebuilding Local Food Systems (RLFS) in Farmworker Communities project, whose goal is trifold: to increase small-scale food production in farmworker communities; to increase low-income community members? access to and consumption of affordable, organic foods; and to raise low income community members? awareness about the importance of producing and consuming fresh fruits and vegetables that are locally grown using methods that conserve natural resources.

Toward this goal, the RLFS project has three (3) distinct objectives: (1) to establish/improve community gardens in four (4) farmworker communities to serve as small-scale agriculture demonstration sites to exemplify potential farm economic development opportunities; (2) to develop/implement a food and farm entrepreneur program to provide education and technical assistance to community members on becoming small farmers by establishing backyard farm operations or forming agricultural cooperatives; and (3) to provide sustainable agriculture, nutrition, and healthy living education to farm worker families and other low-income persons in the target communities.

The primary beneficiaries and engaged populations of the RLFS project are minority, low-income residents of the agricultural areas of South Apopka, Fellsmere, Pierson, and Homestead/Florida City.

The Rebuilding Local Food Systems project aligns well with the following Community Food Projects Competitive Grants Program (CFPCGP) objectives and/or priorities: meet the food needs of low-income individuals; increase the self-reliance of communities in providing for the food needs of the communities; and promote comprehensive responses to local food access, farm, and nutrition issues.

Fiscal Year 2017: Buffalo Community Food Hub Project will engage low-income community members, creating a neighborhood food hub, supporting market gardens, a Mobile market, job training and greater healthy food access The Massachusetts Avenue Project (MAP) and Grassroots Gardens of Western NY (GGWNY) will partner to implement the Buffalo Community Food Hub Project (BCFHP).

Building leadership among low-income youth, new Americans and community gardeners in Buffalo, NY, the project will increase food self-reliance of Buffalo residents, promote comprehensive responses to local food and nutrition issues and meet the food needs of low-income people.

A new Farmhouse and Community Food Training Center will be established at MAP's urban farm on Buffalo's West Side that will serve as a neighborhood food hub and support the creation of market gardens and new market opportunities for local growers, food-based employment and training for disadvantaged youth, greater food access thru Mobile Market expansion, food preparation and preservation education and community organizing to support school and municipal policy in support of local procurement and greater food equity. Da Bus Mobile Market and Food Pantry Da Bus Mobile Market and Food Pantry Project is a three (3) year initiative of The Kohala Center and Hawaii Island Food Alliance to address food insecurity and health disparities on Hawaii Island.

The project goals are to improve access to affordable healthy food among low-income residents; build target area community involvement in addressing food security; support local agricultural development; improve healthy eating and reduce health disparities in chronic diseases; and strengthen linkages between agricultural, entrepreneurial, health, and human service sectors to create a secure local food economy.

To achieve these goals the project will provide for a Mobile Market which will distribute locally-grown produce, staple food items, seeds, and garden starts to low-income residents on Hawaii Island; integrate outreach education on cooking, nutrition, and gardening; provide Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Outreach materials and services; and serve as an emergency food pantry.

The Mobile Market will stop at designated community gathering sites in low-income/low-access rural areas including senior centers, low-income housing complexes, and County Park and Recreation centers.

Project partners include non-profits, health institutions, university agricultural extension agents and nutritionists, farmers, and local grocers.

The project is in alignment with CFPCGP goals by directly addressing the needs of low-income individuals with limited access to healthy food through a long-term solution to food distribution; increasing community self-reliance and encouraging healthy lifestyle development through gardening and cooking classes; and increasing the economic viability of the local food economy by supporting local farmers and grocers. Farms to Food Banks Capacity-Building Project The Farms To Food Banks Capacity Building Project will reduce food insecurity in Kentucky and strengthen the linkages between key sectors of Kentucky's food system, including farmers, nonprofit food distributors and low-income consumers.

Outcomes include increasing the amount of fresh produce distributed to low income Kentuckians by 9 million, increasing by 20% the number of food bank patrons that are aware of the benefits of healthy eating and possessing the skill necessary to prepare fruits and vegetables; and increasing by 200 the number of Kentucky farmers benefitting from a new market for Number 2-grade and surplus produce and an average increase in cash flow of $2,500.00.

The goals and outcomes will be received by providing equipment, such as walk-in coolers and air filtration systems, necessary for safe distribution of fresh produce by food banks and food pantries, by paying farmers to help cover their costs of picking, packing and delivering fresh produce to food banks, and by providing nutrition education services to low-income patrons of food banks and food pantries.

Low-income individuals were involved in program planning and will be actively engaged in program implementation by serving as paid evaluation assistants.

The self-reliance of Kentucky communities will be increased by supporting Kentucky farmers working to diversify their production from tobacco to fruits and vegetables.

Ultimately, the project will help Kentucky do a better job feeding itself. Community to Gardens and Back Again: Feeding Laramie Valley`s community-engaged and driven project to increase sustainable, equitable access to fresh, healthy food in Albany County, Wyoming Community to Gardens and Back Again: Feeding Laramie Valley's community-engaged and driven project to increase sustainable, equitable access to fresh, healthy food in Albany County, Wyoming.

Feeding Laramie Valley (FLV) is a nonprofit organization located in the high elevation, rural community of Albany County, Wyoming.

Headquartered in Laramie since its inception in 2009, FLV leads and facilitates collaborative community projects for sustainable food security, collecting and producing fresh fruits and vegetables for distribution to local residents who do not have sufficient access to enough fresh food to live a healthy life, in an effort to address the fact that Albany County has the highest food insecurity rate in Wyoming.

The goals of a Community Food Project for Feeding Laramie Valley, are designed to create a sustainable, long term approach to addressing food security in Albany County, Wyoming; to open avenues for greater community voice and power in the local food system; to increase the availability of fresh, locally-produced, healthy, affordable food; reduce the high incidence of food insecurity in communities touched by FLV projects; increase awareness and understanding of the connection between fresh produce and improved health; and to forge stronger community ties and networking among gardeners, farmers, entrepreneurs, volunteers, food system.

Plans to accomplish these goals include expansion of community and backyard. Richmond Healthy Corner Store Initiative Expansion Project (RCHD) In the first year of the proposed Healthy Corner Stores Sustainability Project, RCHD and its partner, Shalom Farms, a nonprofit which is currently the sole distributor of produce to Healthy Corner Stores, will introduce new approaches for produce aggregation, storage, and distribution with a small subset of stores in order to determine the best long-term market-driven 'free market'-based model for corner stores in Richmond.

In the remaining two (2) project years, RCHD and Shalom will onboard and/or transition all Healthy Corner Stores to the new model, creating a streamlined system by which produce from regional farmers is aggregated, stored, and distributed to corner stores through well-established retailers and intermediaries, primarily Rudy's Exotic Mushrooms and Produce.

By 2020, the proposed project will transform corner store-based food access work in Richmond from a public health intervention reliant on grant funding for operation to a financially lucrative partnership between vendors and store owners which will sustain mutual investment, spur additional store owners and vendors to participate in future years, and ensure access to a variety of fresh, local produce in Richmond's communities of greatest need.

Fiscal Year 2018: Pertinent details to be provided by Program at a future date.


Agency - Department of Agriculture

Established in 1862, the Department of Agriculture serves all Americans through anti-hunger efforts, stewardship of nearly 200 million acres of national forest and rangelands, and through product safety and conservation efforts. The USDA opens markets for American farmers and ranchers and provides food for needy people around the world.


Relevant Nonprofit Program Categories

K03
Food




Selected Recipients for this Program


RecipientAmount Start DateEnd Date
Riseboro Community Partnership Inc $ 400,000   2019-09-012023-08-31
Refugee & Immigrant Self-empowerment, Inc. $ 370,876   2019-09-012023-08-31
Global Growers Network Inc $ 366,850   2019-09-012023-08-31
Growing Gardens $ 289,920   2019-09-012022-11-30
Sansum Diabetes Research Institute $ 400,000   2018-09-012022-08-31
National Center For Appropriate Technology Inc, The $ 388,476   2018-09-012022-08-31
City Schoolyard Garden, Inc. $ 375,000   2019-09-012022-08-31
Presbyterian Healthcare Services $ 400,000   2018-09-012022-08-31
Liberty's Kitchen, Inc. $ 396,100   2019-09-012022-08-31
Mary Mitchell Family & Youth Center $ 400,000   2018-09-012022-08-31



Program Accomplishments

Fiscal Year 2016: During Fiscal Year (FY) 2016, 173 applications were received, and 33 awards were funded, totaling $8.64 million. The funding ratio is 19%. Fiscal Year 2017: During Fiscal Year (FY) 2017, 239 applications were received, and awards were funded, totaling $8.64 million. The funding ratio is 17%. Fiscal Year 2018: For FY 2018, $8.64 million is appropriated for this program. Pertinent data to be provided by Program at a future date.

Uses and Use Restrictions

Community food projects are intended to take a comprehensive approach to developing long-term solutions that help to ensure food security in communities by linking the food sector to community development, economic opportunity, and environmental enhancement.

Comprehensive solutions may include elements such as: (1) Improved access to high quality, affordable food among low-income households; (2) support for local food systems, from urban gardening to local farms that provide high quality fresh food, ideally with minimal adverse environmental impact; and (3) expanded economic opportunities for community residents through local business or other economic development, improved employment opportunities, job training, youth apprenticeship, school-to-work transition, and the like.

Any solution proposed must tie into community food needs.

Successful applicants must provide matching funds, either in cash or in-kind amounting to at least 50 percent of the total cost of the project during the term of the grant award.

1.

Construction and Renovation: With prior approval, and in accordance with applicable Federal cost principles, grant funds may be used to plan, acquire, or construct a building or facility, or to acquire land; and for improvements, alterations, renovations, or repairs to land or buildings, necessary to carry out a funded project under this program.

However, requests to use grant funds for such purposes must demonstrate that such expenditures are essential to achieving the major purpose for which the grant request is made.

2.

Indirect Costs: Full Negotiated Rate. Special Note on Indirect Costs as in-kind matching contributions: Indirect costs may be claimed under the Federal portion of the award budget or, alternatively, indirect costs may be claimed as a matching contribution (if no indirect costs are requested under the Federal portion of the award budget).

However, unless explicitly authorized in the RFA, indirect costs may not be claimed on both the Federal portion of the award budget and as a matching contribution, unless the total claimed on both the Federal portion of the award budget and as a matching contribution does not exceed the maximum allowed indirect costs or the institution?s negotiated indirect cost rate, whichever is less.

An awardee may split the allocation between the Federal and non-Federal portions of the budget only if the total amount of indirect costs charged to the project does not exceed the maximum allowed indirect costs or the institution?s negotiated indirect cost rate, whichever is less.

For example, if an awardees' indirect costs are capped at 30 percent pursuant to FY 2012 appropriated funds, Section 720 of the Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2012 (Division A of Pub.

L.

112-55), the awardee may request 15 percent of the indirect costs on both the Federal portion of the award and as a matching contribution.

Or, the awardee may request any similar percentage that, when combined, does not exceed the maximum indirect cost rate of 30 percent.

Eligibility Requirements

Applicant Eligibility

Proposals may be submitted by private nonprofit entities.

Because projects must promote comprehensive responses to local food, farm, and nutrition issues, applicants are encouraged to seek and create partnership among public, private nonprofit and private for-profit organizations or firms.

To be further eligible for a grant, a private nonprofit applicant must meet three mandatory requirements: 1.

Have experience in the area of: (a) community food work, particularly concerning small and medium-sized farms, including the provision of food to people in low-income communities and the development of new markets in low-income communities for agricultural producers; or (b) job training and business development activities in low-income communities; 2.

demonstrate competency to implement a project, provide fiscal accountability and oversight, collect data, and prepare reports and other appropriate documentation; and 3.

demonstrate a willingness to share information with researchers, practitioners, and other interested parties.

Beneficiary Eligibility

Low income people.

Credentials/Documentation

The System for Award Management (SAM) combines eight federal procurement systems, including CCR, and the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance into one new system. CCR activities are conducted through SAM (the CCR website will redirect users to SAM). Dun and Bradstreet Universal Numbering System (DUNS) Number and System for Award Management (SAM): Each applicant (unless excepted under 2 CFR § 25.110(b) or (c), or has an exception approved by the Federal awarding agency under 2 CFR § 25.110(d)) is required to: (i) Be registered in SAM before submitting its application; (ii) Provide a valid DUNS number in its application; and (iii) Continue to maintain an active SAM registration with current information at all times during which it has an active Federal award or an application or plan under consideration by a Federal awarding agency. It also must state that the Federal awarding agency may not make a Federal award to an applicant until the applicant has complied with all applicable DUNS and SAM requirements and, if an applicant has not fully complied with the requirements by the time the Federal awarding agency is ready to make a Federal award, the Federal awarding agency may determine that the applicant is not qualified to receive a Federal award and use that determination as a basis for making a Federal award to another applicant. Applicants must furnish the information required in the Competitive Request for Applications (RFAs). Successful applicants recommended for funding must furnish the information and assurances requested during the award documentation process. These include, but are not limited to the following: Organizational Management Information - Specific management information relating to an applicant shall be submitted on a one time basis, with updates on an as needed basis, as part of the responsibility determination prior to the award of a grant identified under this RFA, if such information has not been provided previously under this or another NIFA program. NIFA will provide copies of forms recommended for use in fulfilling these requirements as part of the preaward process. Although an applicant may be eligible based on its status as one of these entities, there are factors which may exclude an applicant from receiving Federal financial and nonfinancial assistance and benefits under this program (e.g., debarment or suspension of an individual involved or a determination that an applicant is not responsible based on submitted organizational management information). This information collection is approved under OMB Circular Control No. 0524-0026, ?Assurance of Compliance with the Department of Agriculture Regulations Assuring Civil Rights, Compliance and Organization Information.? SPECIAL NOTE: Please refer to the Competitive Request for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details. The most current RFAs are available as follows: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/community-food-projects-cfp-competitive-grants-program RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Competitive RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database. 2 CFR 200, Subpart E - Cost Principles applies to this program.

Aplication and Award Process

Preapplication Coordination

All RFAs are published on the Agency?s website and Grants.gov.

Applicants must complete the Grants.gov registration process.

Please see the following Grants.gov link for more information: http://www.grants.gov/applicants/get_registered.jsp.

An environmental impact statement is required for this program.

This program is excluded from coverage under E.O.

12372.

Application Procedures

2 CFR 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards applies to this program. The National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) only accepts electronic applications which are submitted via Grants.gov in response to specific Requests for Applications (RFA). Applicants must complete the Grants.gov registration process. For information about the pre-award phase of the grant lifecycle application processes see: http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/learn-grants/grants-101/pre-award-phase.html. Further, applicants must follow the instructions provided in the NIFA Grants.gov Application Guide, which can be assessed as follows: Adobe NIFA Applications. 2 CFR part 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards and 2 CFR part 400 USDA?s Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards apply to this program. SPECIAL NOTE: Please refer to the Competitive Request for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details. The most current RFAs are available via: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/community-food-projects-cfp-competitive-grants-program RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Competitive RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database.

Award Procedures

Applications are subjected to a system of peer and merit review in accordance with section 103 of the Agricultural Research, Extension and Education Reform Act of 1998 (7 U.S.C. 7613) by a panel of qualified scientists and other appropriate persons who are specialists in the field covered by the proposal. Within the limit of funds available for such purpose, the NIFA Authorized Departmental Officer (ADO) shall make grants to those responsible, eligible applicants whose applications are judged most meritorious under the procedures set forth in the RFA. Reviewers will be selected based upon training and experience in relevant scientific, extension, or education fields, taking into account the following factors: (a) The level of relevant formal scientific, technical education, or extension experience of the individual, as well as the extent to which an individual is engaged in relevant research, education, or extension activities; (b) the need to include as reviewers experts from various areas of specialization within relevant scientific, education, or extension fields; (c) the need to include as reviewers other experts (e.g., producers, range or forest managers/operators, and consumers) who can assess relevance of the applications to targeted audiences and to program needs; (d) the need to include as reviewers experts from a variety of organizational types (e.g., colleges, universities, industry, state and Federal agencies, private profit and non-profit organizations) and geographic locations; (e) the need to maintain a balanced composition of reviewers with regard to minority and female representation and an equitable age distribution; and (f) the need to include reviewers who can judge the effective usefulness to producers and the general public of each application. Evaluation Criteria will be delineated in the Competitive Request for Applications (RFA). 2 CFR 200 ? Subpart C and Appendix I and 2 CFR part 400 apply to this Program. SPECIAL NOTE: Please refer to the Competitive Request for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details. The most current RFAs are available via: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/community-food-projects-cfp-competitive-grants-program RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Competitive RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database.

Deadlines

Contact the headquarters or regional office, as appropriate, for application deadlines.

Authorization

The Community Food Projects Competitive Grants Program (CFPCGP) legislative authority is located in Section 25 of the Food Stamp Act of 1977 (7 U.S.C. 2034), as amended by the Food and Nutrition Act of 2008 and Section 4402 of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act (FCEA) of 2008 (Pub. L. 110-246), which authorizes a program of federal grants to establish and carry out Community Food Projects., 7 U.S.C 2034.

Range of Approval/Disapproval Time

From 30 to 60 days. Contact the National Program Leader (NPL), as indicated per CFDA Section # 152 ? Headquarters Office regarding dates for specific deadlines, start and end dates, and range of approval/disapproval time. Information is also available via our website and may be obtained via the Grants.gov website. NIFA?s respective links regarding general information are provided below: http://nifa.usda.gov/ http://www.grants.gov. SPECIAL NOTE: Please refer to the Competitive Request for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details. The most current RFA is available via: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/secondary-education-two-year-postsecondary-education-and-agriculture-k-12 RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Competitive RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database.

Appeals

Not Applicable. 2 CFR Part 200 ? Subparts D & E apply to this program.

Renewals

Specific details are provided in the Request for Applications (RFA), which are generally published annually. The most current RFA is available via: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/community-food-projects-cfp-competitive-grants-program.

Assistance Considerations

Formula and Matching Requirements

This program has no statutory formula. Matching Requirements: Percent: 100%. Successful CFP applicants and PP award applicants MUST provide matching on a dollar-for-dollar basis (100%) for all federal funds awarded. Matching funds are not required for T & TA grants. The legislation establishing the FSLC requires that as a condition to receiving a grant from NIFA, the NGO must contribute in-kind resources toward implementing the grant. To comply with this provision, NIFA has determined that applicants must provide at least 25 percent of total project resources on an in-kind basis during the term of the grant award. The Federal share of FSLC costs can be no more than 75 percent of total project costs. CFP, PP and FSCL grantees may provide matching funds through cash and/or in-kind contributions, including third-party in-kind contributions fairly evaluated, including facilities. The non-federal share of the funding may come from state government, local government, other non-profit entities, or private sources. Examples of qualifying matching contributions may include direct costs such as: rent for office space used exclusively for the funded project; duplication or postage costs; and staff time from an entity other than the applicant for job training or nutrition education. SPECIAL NOTES: (1) Use of Indirect Costs as In-Kind Matching Contributions. Indirect costs may be claimed under the Federal portion of the award budget or, alternatively, indirect costs may be claimed as a matching contribution (if no indirect costs are requested under the Federal portion of the award budget). However, unless explicitly authorized in the RFA, indirect costs may not be claimed on both the Federal portion of the award budget and as a matching contribution, unless the total claimed on both the Federal portion of the award budget and as a matching contribution does not exceed the maximum allowed indirect costs or the institution?s negotiated indirect cost rate, whichever is less. An awardee may split the allocation between the Federal and non-Federal portions of the budget only if the total amount of indirect costs charged to the project does not exceed the maximum allowed indirect costs or the institution?s negotiated indirect cost rate, whichever is less. For example, if an awardees' indirect costs are capped at 22 percent pursuant to section 1462(a) of NARETPA (7 U.S.C. 3310(a)), the awardee may request 11 percent of the indirect costs on both the Federal portion of the award and as a matching contribution. Or, the awardee may request any similar percentage that, when combined, does not exceed the maximum indirect cost rate of 22 percent. (2) Matching funds are not required for training and technical assistance (T & TA) grants. MOE requirements are not applicable to this program.

Length and Time Phasing of Assistance

The term of competitive project grants and/or cooperative agreements under this program may not exceed three (3) years. 2 CFR Part 200, Subpart D applies to this program. In accordance with statutory time limits, project periods, including no-cost extensions of time, are not to exceed five (5) years. Further details are provided in the Award document Form NIFA-2009 and the NIFA General Terms and Conditions Grants and Cooperative Agreements (dated October 2016) at: https://nifa.usda.gov/resource/nifa-general-terms-and-conditions-grants-and-cooperative-agreements-october-2016. SPECIAL NOTE: Please refer to the Competitive Request for Applications (RFAs) for specific and pertinent details. The most current RFAs are available via: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/community-food-projects-cfp-competitive-grants-program RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Competitive RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database. See the following for information on how assistance is awarded/released: NIFA utilizes the Automated Standard Application for Payments (ASAP), a secure, web-based electronic payment and information system that allows federal agencies to administer funds. Currently, ASAP is the only payment source for new NIFA grantees.

Post Assistance Requirements

Reports

REEport GRANT REPORTING: All grant reporting must be completed using the Research, Education, and Extension project online reporting tool (REEport).

Initial reporting (item a.

below) is to be submitted through the REEport system.

Annual progress and final reporting (items b.

and c.

below) also is to be done through the REEport system.

Information on REEport can be found on NIFA?s web site at https://nifa.usda.gov/tool/reeport and the REEport software can be found at http://portal.nifa.usda.gov.

a.

Initial Documentation in the REEport Database-- Research, Education, and Extension project online reporting tool (REEport) All projects must be documented in REEport.

The NIFA contact for all REEport documentation is: REEport National Institute of Food and Agriculture U.S.

Department of Agriculture STOP 2213 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, D.C.

20250-2213 Telephone: (202) 690-0009 E-mail: electronic@nifa.usda.gov b.

Annual Progress Reports. All projects must report annually into REEport.

An annual Progress Report is due 90 calendar days after the award?s anniversary date (i.e., one year following the month and day of which the project period begins and each year thereafter up until a final report is required).

An annual Progress Report covers the most recent one-year period.

The following information, when applicable, must be included in the Project Modifications section of the annual Progress Report. 1) A comparison of actual accomplishments with the goals established for the reporting period (where the output of the project can be expressed readily in numbers, a computation of the cost per unit of output should be submitted if the information is considered useful); (2) The reasons for slippage if established goals were not met; and (3) Additional pertinent information including, when appropriate, analysis and explanation of cost overruns or unexpectedly high unit costs. c.

Final Technical Report The Final Technical Report is required within 90 calendar days after the expiration or termination of the award.

The Final Technical Report covers the entire period of performance of the award and must describe progress made during the entire timeframe of the project instead of covering accomplishments made only during the final reporting segment of the project.

In addition to supplying the information required under item b.

of this article, the final report must include the following when applicable: Identify equipment purchased with any Federal funds under the award and indicate subsequent use of such equipment. FINANCIAL REPORTING: As outlined in 2 CFR 200.327, the recipient must submit financial status reports by the frequency required in the terms and conditions of the award.

The following are the financial reporting requirements for NIFA. Federal Financial Report, Form SF-425: NIFA uses the SF-425, Federal Financial Report to monitor cash.

A ?Federal Financial Report,? Form SF-425, is due on an annual basis no later than 90 days following the end of the award anniversary date (i.e., one year following the month and day when the project period begins and each year thereafter up until a final report is required).

An annual Progress Report covers the most recent one-year period.

A final ?Federal Financial Report,? Form SF-425, is due 90 days after the expiration date of this award.

The report must be submitted to the Awards Management Division (AMD) as a pdf attachment to an email sent to awards@nifa.usda.gov. If questions are encountered regarding financial reporting requirements, please contact: Awards Management Division (AMD) Office of Grants and Financial Management (OGFM) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) U.S.

Department of Agriculture (USDA) STOP 2271 1400 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20250-2271 Telephone: (202) 401-4986 SPECIAL NOTES: (1) Refer to the Competitive Requests for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details.

RFAs are generally released annually and provide the most current and accurate information available.

Any specific instructions in the Competitive RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database. (2) The details of the reporting requirements are included in the NIFA General Terms and Conditions Grants and Cooperative Agreements (dated October 2016). (3) Further guidance is provided under 2 CFR Part 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards and 2 CFR Part 400, USDA?s Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards.

Cash reports are not applicable.

PROGRESS REPORTS: See above for pertinent and specific details.

EXPENDITURE REPORTS: See above for pertinent and specific details.

PERFORMANCE MONITORING: See above for pertinent and specific details.

Audits

In accordance with the provisions of 2 CFR 200, Subpart F - Audit Requirements, non-Federal entities that expend financial assistance of $750,000 or more in Federal awards will have a single or a program-specific audit conducted for that year. Non-Federal entities that expend less than $750,000 a year in Federal awards are exempt from Federal audit requirements for that year, except as noted in 2 CFR 200.503. In accordance with 2 CFR Part 400 - Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards, Subpart F - Audit Requirements nonfederal entities that expend financial assistance of $750,000 or more during the non-Federal entity?s fiscal year in Federal awards must have a single or program-specific audit conducted for that year in accordance with the provisions of this part. A non-Federal entity that expends less than $750,000 during the non-Federal entity?s fiscal year in Federal awards is exempt from Federal audit requirements for that year, except as noted in § 200.503. Relation to other audit requirements, but records must be available for review or audit by appropriate officials of the Federal agency, pass-through entity, and Government Accountability Office (GAO). This program is also subject to audit by the cognizant Federal audit agency and the USDA Office of Inspector General. Relation to other audit requirements, but records must be available for review or audit by appropriate officials of the Federal agency, pass-through entity, and Government Accountability Office (GAO). This program is also subject to audit by the cognizant Federal audit agency and the USDA Office of Inspector General.

Records

In accordance with 2 CFR Part 400 - Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards, § 200.333 Retention requirements for records. Grantees shall maintain separate records for each grant to ensure that funds are used for authorized purposes. Grant-related records are subject to inspection during the life of the grant and must be retained at least three (3) years. Records must be retained beyond the three (3) year period if litigation is pending or audit findings have not been resolved. 2 CFR Part 200, Subpart D applies to this program.

Financial Information

Account Identification

12-3505-0-1-605.

Obigations

(Project Grants) FY 16 $8,640,000; FY 17 est $8,640,000; and FY 18 est $8,640,000 - The difference between the appropriation and obligation numbers reflects legislative authorized set-asides deducted as appropriate, and in some cases the availability of obligational authority from prior years.

Range and Average of Financial Assistance

If minimum or maximum amounts of funding per competitive and/or capacity project grant, or cooperative agreement are established, these amounts will be announced in the annual Competitive Request for Application (RFA). The most current RFA is available via: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/community-food-projects-cfp-competitive-grants-program.

Regulations, Guidelines, and Literature

As an administrator of U.S. government support, NIFA works in partnership with grantees to ensure responsible stewardship of federal funds. Our grantees and partners are required to comply with all relevant rules and regulations. The following resources are provided to NIFA?s partners and award recipients to support their adherence to federal regulations governing program performance: NIFA?s primary (main) website: https://nifa.usda.gov/regulations-and-guidelines The following represent specific documents and direct links: POLICY GUIDE NIFA?s Federal Assistance Policy Guide describes agency policies and procedures. https://nifa.usda.gov/policy-guide CERTIFICATIONS AND REPRESENTATIONS Certifications and representations provided through the NIFA application process. https://nifa.usda.gov/certifications-and-representations ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF USDA SUPPORT BY NIFA When acknowledging USDA support in accordance with 2 CFR Part 415, grantees must use the following acknowledgement for all projects or initiatives supported by NIFA. https://nifa.usda.gov/acknowledgment-usda-support-nifa FEDERAL REGULATIONS The Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) lists all regulations published in the Federal Register. https://nifa.usda.gov/federal-regulations FOIA The Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) provides that any person has the right to request access to federal documents and information such as research data. https://nifa.usda.gov/foia NEPA POLICY AND GUIDANCE The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Policy and Guidance set the standard for identifying potential environmental impacts. https://nifa.usda.gov/nepa-policy-and-guidance OGFM ISSUED CORRESPONDENCE The Office of Grants and Financial Management occasionally issues correspondence to applicants, grantees, and/or the general public for informational or clarification purposes. https://nifa.usda.gov/ogfm-issued-correspondence RESEARCH MISCONDUCT NIFA requires that all its awardees adhere to the USDA Scientific Integrity Policy and the Federal Policy on Research Misconduct. https://nifa.usda.gov/research-misconduct NIFA?S GENERAL AWARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS Award terms and conditions are determined by statutory, regulatory, and agency requirements, as well as each grant?s circumstances. Terms and conditions dictate important items related to your grant, including method of payment, reporting frequency and content, and prior approval requirements. References to the terms and conditions of awards are located on the NIFA 2009 Award Fact Sheet. NIFA's general award terms and conditions (see link below) is applicable to this program, for awards with an award date on December 26, 2014 and thereafter. https://nifa.usda.gov/resource/nifa-general-terms-and-conditions-grants-and-cooperative-agreements-october-2016.

Information Contacts

Regional or Local Office

None.

Headquarters Office

USDA, NIFA, National Program Leader, Institute of Food Safety and Nutrition, Division of Nutrition, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., STOP 2225, Washington, District of Columbia 20250-2225 Email: Policy@nifa.usda.gov Phone: (202) 401-2138 Fax: (202) 401-6488.

Criteria for Selecting Proposals

Within guidelines established for the program as described in the Request for Application (RFA). 1. The applicability and merit of the proposed project in regard to its ability to: Meet the food needs of low-income people in the proposed community for providing for its own food needs; and promote comprehensive responses to local food, farm, and nutrition needs; 2. the capacity to become self-sustaining once Federal funding ends; and 3. organizational and staff qualifications and experience; and 4. additional criteria will be considered relative to the extent the proposed project contributes to: (a) developing linkages between two or more sectors of the food system; (b) supporting the development of entrepreneurial projects; (c) developing innovative linkages between the for-profit and nonprofit food sectors; (d) encouraging long-term planning activities and multi-system, interagency approaches; and (e) incorporating linkages to one or more ongoing USDA themes or initiatives referred to in the program guidelines and/or annual proposal solicitation. 2 CFR part 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards and 2 CFR part 400 USDA?s Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards apply to this program. Within guidelines established for the program as described in the Competitive Request for Application (RFA). The most current RFAs are available via: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/community-food-projects-cfp-competitive-grants-program.



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