Consumer Data and Nutrition Research

To provide economic and other social science information and analysis for public and private decisions on agriculture, food, natural resources, and rural America.

ERS produces such information for use by the general public and to help the executive and legislative branches develop, administer,

credit: Martin Godwin for the Guardian
and evaluate agricultural and rural policies and programs.
Related Programs

Examples of Funded Projects

Fiscal Year 2016: --Assessing Alternative Methods for Measuring Food Security Among Households with Children -- Understanding Produce Purchasing Behavior, Obesity, and BMI: Empirical Results from IRI Household Panel and Med Profiler Data -- Local Market Structure, Store Characteristics, and Performance among Independent Grocers -- Effect of Retail Market Structure and other Food Environment Characteristics on the Healthfulness of Consumer Food Purchases --Consumer Preferences for Costly Brands and Products: Implications for Cost Containment in the Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Program -- Does the amount of SNAP benefits influence food choices and expenditures? -- The effects of pricing strategies on the nutritional quality of food purchases by SNAP and non-SNAP households -- Community Eligibility Provision Take-Up by Rural vs.

Urban School Districts and Effects on School Meal Participation and Student attendance -- Summer Meal Program participation by Rural vs.

Urban School Districts -- SNAP and Child Health: Evidence from Missouri Administrative Data -- The Fill-In Trip Purchase Decision by SNAP and WIC Participants: An Analysis of Pricing, Nutrition, and Store Choices -- Does inclusion on the WIC food list expand placement of food brands? -- Performance Indicators of WIC Vendor Quality and Participant Satisfaction -- Funding Research on Food Security Using the Panel Study of Income Dynamics -- Exploring ways to increase healthy purchases within shoppersÆ and retailersÆ budget constraints -- Health Outcomes and Redemption Behaviors among Virginia WIC Participants -- Changes in Low-Income HouseholdsÆ Spending Patterns in Response to the 2013 SNAP Benefit Cut -- Understanding the Statistical Properties of IRI Store-based and House-based Scanner Data -- Expert Technical Panel on Technical Questions and Data Gaps in the ERS Loss-Adjusted Food Availability (LAFA) Data Series -- Expanding the Impact of the Cornell Center for Behavioral Economics in Child Nutrition Programs -- Consumer Level Food Loss: An Update of Estimates for Cooking Loss and Uneaten Food at the Consumer Level -- FoodAPS-2 Geography Study.

Fiscal Year 2017: ERS will identify key economic issues affecting food prices, food access and availability, food consumption patterns, and food safety.

ERS will use sound analytical techniques to understand the immediate and long-term efficiency, efficacy, and equity consequences of alternative policies and programs aimed at ensuring access by children and adults to safe, nutritious, affordable, and adequate meals.

ERS ongoing research will also explore factors that can improve the effectiveness and efficiency of USDA Food and Nutrition Assistance programs.

ERS will effectively communicate research results to policy makers, program managers, and those shaping efforts to promote abundant, safe, and healthful food at home and abroad.

Examples of these activities include the following: ? Providing economic analysis of the food marketing system to understand factors affecting the availability and affordability of food for American consumers.

? Providing annual estimates of the quantity of food available for human consumption, and measures of disappearance and loss in the food system. ? Providing economic analysis of how people make food choices, including demands for more healthful, nutritious, and safer food, and of the determinants of those choices, including prices, income, education, and socio-economic characteristics. ? Conducting analyses of the benefits and costs of policies to change behavior to improve diet and health, including nutrition education, labeling, advertising, and regulation. ? Conducting economic analyses of the impacts of the Nation?s domestic nutrition assistance programs, including the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP); the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children; and the Child Nutrition Programs. ? Conducting research on food program targeting and delivery to gauge the success of programs aimed at needy and at-risk population groups, and to identify program gaps and overlaps. ? Conducting research on program dynamics and administration, focusing on how program needs change with local labor market conditions, economic growth and recession, and how changing State welfare programs interact with food and nutrition programs. ? Providing food safety information through publications, web materials, and briefings that address the economics of food safety, including consumer knowledge and behavior, industry practices, the relationship between international trade and food safety, and government policies and regulations. ? Working with Federal food safety agency partners to evaluate available food borne illness data related to meat, poultry and egg products, and to develop more accurate measures of the effectiveness of regulatory strategies in reducing preventable food borne illness.

Fiscal Year 2018: ERS will conduct the following research on USDA?s food and nutrition assistance programs: Food Insecurity in Veteran Households.

Food insecurity as a measure of well-being for veterans and their households is relatively unstudied.

Previous studies have been restricted to non-nationally representative samples or focused on veterans with disabilities.

This study uses a nationally representative sample of veterans to describe the prevalence of food insecurity among veterans, subpopulations of veterans, and veteran households by selected characteristics.

Using Administrative Data to Improve Research on the Causal Effects of the SNAP Program on Labor Supply.

This project continues the work on the effects of food assistance program participation on individuals? incentives to work.

Previous work examined the issue using Current Population Survey (CPS) data from Census that contain labor supply information as well as information on whether the individual participated in the SNAP program.

Misreporting of SNAP participation in CPS data is a major issue with uncertain effects on estimates of the effect of participation on outcomes.

The goal of the project will be to link administrative data sources to CPS data, examine how estimates of causal effects of SNAP participation on labor supply are affected by SNAP misreporting, and examine possible solutions to bias created by misreporting.

The Food Assistance National Input-Output Multiplier (FANIOM) Model and Stimulus Effects of SNAP.

This project will examine the role of SNAP as a stimulus measure during an economic downturn.

Using the Food Assistance National Input-Output Multiplier (FANIOM) model, we estimate the multiplier effect of a hypothetical SNAP expansion on economic output and employment.

Since the end of the Great Recession, new research and new data sources are available to inform on this topic.

Borrowing on these new sources, this project extends the work of ERS researchers in 2012 to provide an updated estimate of the multiplier effect of the SNAP program on the economy.

Additionally, we review new literature examining the impact of the SNAP program on the economy during the Great Recession.

The Role of SNAP in the Rural Economy.

ERS research will compare the rural impacts of the Supplemental Food Assistance Program (SNAP) to those in urban areas and to impacts of other Federal programs targeted to rural areas, such as agricultural commodity and rural development programs.

Although SNAP is the largest USDA program, little research has investigated the economic effects of SNAP in rural areas.

The project will examine how SNAP affects household savings and consumption decisions, impacts of SNAP on employment in rural vs.

urban communities, and impacts of SNAP compared to impacts of agricultural commodity programs nationally and in selected regions.

Characteristics of School Districts Offering Free School Meals to All Students Throught the Community Eligiblity Provision.

This project will study the determinants of school and district participation in the Community Eligibility Provision (CEP).

In 2010, Congress mandated the CEP as a reimbursement option that allows schools serving high percentages of low-income students to offer USDA school meals at no charge to all students with reduced administrative burden.

USDA?s Food and Nutrition Service expects the CEP to result in expanded participation with most impact on poor or near-poor students who may benefit the most from USDA?s child nutrition programs.

Food Costs of Large School Food Authorities in the National School Lunch Program.

The Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) reimburses school food authorities (SFAs) for the estimated costs of providing school lunches and breakfasts.

Reimbursement rates are based on cost accounting techniques that measure SFA labor, food purchase, and operating material costs.

All SFAs in the 48 contiguous states receive the same reimbursement rates regardless of size or geographic location.

Thus FNS implicitly assumes that labor and food purchase costs are the same across SFAs.

Recent research shows that economies of scale exist in meal service and food costs vary across SFAs.

Yet SFAs vary in size from large, urban SFAs serving millions of meals per year to small, rural and suburban SFAs serving less than 10,000 meals.

This research will determine if cost differences exist in food purchases and if so, how these differences in costs shape food choices. WIC and the Retail Markup of Infant Formula.

This project will examine the retail markup of the formula purchased through WIC.

The number of participants in WIC who can be served within the fixed budget depends heavily on the program?s food-package costs, which in turn are significantly affected by the cost of infant formula.

Do retailers charge higher markups for the WIC contract brand than for the non-WIC brands of formula? This is an important question because retail markups, along with the net prices, are what WIC?and ultimately U.S.

taxpayers?pay for infant formula.

The answer to this question may also have implications for the prices that non-WIC participants pay for infant formula.

ERS will conduct the following research on food safety, foodborne illness, and industry practices: Estimating Food Attributable Fractions of Foodborne Illness from Time Series Data.

Reliable measures of the relative role of different foods in foodborne illness caused by specific pathogens are critical to government?s and industry?s ability to target food safety interventions effectively.

USDA, FDA and CDC have all identified a need for new, more reliable methods to estimate this relationship.

This collaborative study between ERS, CDC and the University of California, Berkeley pioneers use of Nielsen HomeScan time series data on food consumption and FoodNet foodborne illness surveillance to estimate the relative contributions of specific foods to illnesses caused by major foodborne pathogens.

Trends in Food Product Recalls: 2004-2013.

Food product recalls, the removal of risky food products from the marketplace, can impose significant burdens for consumers, producers, and regulators.

This report analyzes trends and patterns of food product recall events from 2004 to 2013.

The analysis considers multiple factors, including the types of foods being recalled, the reasons for initiating the recalls, the severity of the risks posed by the recalled products, and the geographic distribution.

The 2011 Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) and the Fresh Produce Industry.

Using new survey data collected through a joint ERS/NASS initiative, ERS researchers will assess pre-implementation food safety practices relative to several FSMA rules specifically focused on fresh produce.

Results will compare food safety practices and costs of adoption for different size farms or post-harvest operations, for different regions of the country, and to the extent possible for different produce commodities.

The research will provide a baseline for eventual assessment of effectiveness of FSMA adoption.


Agency - Department of Agriculture

Established in 1862, the Department of Agriculture serves all Americans through anti-hunger efforts, stewardship of nearly 200 million acres of national forest and rangelands, and through product safety and conservation efforts. The USDA opens markets for American farmers and ranchers and provides food for needy people around the world.


Relevant Nonprofit Program Categories





Selected Recipients for this Program


RecipientAmount Start DateEnd Date
Research Triangle Institute $ 299,996   2020-08-052021-12-31
Trustees Of Tufts College $ 233,880   2016-09-192021-09-18
University Of Missouri System $ 5,751   2015-06-072020-06-06
Regents Of The University Of Michigan $ 73,266   2015-01-122020-01-11
University Of Baltimore-$ 9   2015-09-222019-09-30
Trustees Of Tufts College $ 600,000   2016-09-192019-09-30
Research Triangle Institute $ 320,000   2013-09-102019-09-30
Duke University-$ 2,060   2014-09-302019-09-29
Research Triangle Institute-$ 966   2016-09-222018-09-30
Cornell University $ 1,884,220   2015-09-162018-09-30



Program Accomplishments

Fiscal Year 2016: ERS research on food choices and health outcomes showed the following: ? Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) participants are less likely to drive their own car to do their primary food shopping and more likely to get rides from someone else or take public transit. However, these differences in transportation mode do not translate into differences in the types of stores used for grocery shopping among SNAP households. The National Household Food Acquisition and Purchase Survey (FoodAPS) is the first survey to collect unique and comprehensive data about food purchases and acquisitions for a nationally representative sample of U.S. households. In March 2015, ERS published a report that compared shopping patterns of SNAP households to low- and higher income nonparticipant households and found that many households bypass the store that is closest to them to shop at another store. For example, among SNAP households, the nearest store was, on average, 2.0 miles from the household, but the store primarily used for grocery shopping was, on average, 3.4 miles from the household. Multiple intramural and extramural research projects are underway using FoodAPS with reports focusing on general food expenditures and WIC participant shopping behavior planned for release in 2016. ? An estimated 86 percent of American households were food secure throughout the entire year in 2014, meaning that they had access at all times to enough food for an active, healthy life for all household members. The remaining households (14 percent) were food insecure at least some time during the year, including 5.6 percent with very low food security because the household lacked money and other resources for food, resulting in reduced food intake and disruptions in eating patterns for one or more household members. Additional research focused specifically on children shows that an estimated 90.6 percent of households with children were food secure throughout the year in 2011, which denotes that all household members had consistent access to adequate food for active, healthy lives. The ERS food security statistics are widely recognized as the benchmark for measuring food security in the U.S., and support decision making on USDA food assistance and nutrition programs. ? Following Dietary Guidance need not cost more, but many Americans would need to re-allocate their food budgets to do so. Behavioral changes can improve diet quality, but major improvements would require Americans to change how they allocate their food budgets across food groups. Most Americans across all income levels consume poor diets. Behavior changes, such as preparing food at home instead of eating out, are associated with improvements in diet quality. To realize the much larger improvements in diet quality required to meet the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, ERS research found that many Americans would need to reallocate their food budgets, spending a larger share on fruits and vegetables and a lower share on protein foods and foods high in solid fats, added sugars, and sodium. Briefings on this topic to senior USDA and other policy officials informed discussions of the upcoming release of the 2015 Dietary Guidelines. ? An estimated 1,249 calories per capita per day are lost from the food supply. ERS published the latest estimates on the amount and value of food loss in the United States. These estimates are for more than 200 individual foods using ERS?s Loss-Adjusted Food Availability data. In 2010, an estimated 31 percent, or 133 billion pounds, of the 430 billion pounds of food produced was not available for human consumption at the retail and consumer levels. This amount of loss totaled an estimated $161.6 billion, as purchased at retail prices. For the first time, ERS estimates of the calories associated with food loss are presented in this report. The top three food groups in terms of the share of the total value of food loss at the retail and consumer levels are meat, poultry, and fish (30 percent), vegetables (19 percent), and dairy products (17 percent). Food loss data from ERS is used to support USDA?s Food Waste Challenge initiative and also provides a model for other countries? efforts to estimate food loss. ? Households living in low-income, low food-access areas have only slightly lower diet quality than other households and this difference is partially alleviated when these consumers travel farther from their homes to purchase food. About 10 percent of the U.S. population lives in low-income areas more than 1 mile from the nearest supermarket. The diet quality of these consumers may be compromised by their food environment. Some may be unable to reach supermarkets regularly or without effort, instead buying food from closer stores that offer less healthy food products. ERS investigated the correlation between households that live in low-income, low-access areas and their purchases of 14 major food groups that vary in dietary quality using supermarket scanner data. Briefings on this topic to senior USDA and other policy officials informed discussions of continuing efforts to improve food access for low-income households across the U.S. ERS research on USDA?s food and nutrition assistance programs found the following: ? ERS linked 2008-12 SNAP administrative records to data from the U.S. Census Bureau?s American Community Survey (ACS) on the use of SNAP and other public assistance programs to provide better information on SNAP receipt than that which would be estimated by the ACS alone. SNAP provides food and nutrition benefits to low-income households based on a formula that adjusts the benefit amount a household receives based on monthly need. ERS assessed the extent to which SNAP reaches the poorest households, also known as benefit targeting, by estimating benefit receipt by annual household income relative to poverty. Estimates of SNAP targeting toward low-income households improve when using either of two measures of intensity of SNAP participation relative to measures of ever-in-the-year participation. Replacing survey-based data on SNAP benefit receipt with administrative records of SNAP benefit receipt and adjusting the survey households to more closely reflect administrative SNAP units also improves estimates of targeting to low-income participants. Briefings to senior official at FNCS and FNS informed decision makers about the effect of more expansive data on participation measures. ? School meal programs are adjusting to stronger nutritional standards, but face challenges in maintaining paid lunch participation to meet revenue goals. School foodservice programs face ongoing tradeoffs between meal cost, student participation, and nutrition quality. Changes mandated by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 strengthened nutritional standards for meals and competitive foods and set minimum levels for paid meal revenues, while new options allow more schools to offer free meals to all students at reduced administrative burden. An ERS review of recent research results and new data on school lunch participation rates suggests that while many school districts have adjusted to new standards, maintaining paid meal participation remains most challenging for smaller and more rural districts. Briefings to senior USDA officials on this topic have informed USDA efforts to help States meet the challenges related to improving nutrition within allotted budgets. ERS research on the safety of the nation?s food supply found the following: ? Cost estimates of foodborne illnesses data provide Federal agencies with consistent, peer-reviewed estimates of the costs of foodborne illness that can be used in analyzing the impact of Federal regulations. ERS?s Cost of Foodborne Illness data product, produced in collaboration with the Food Safety and Inspection Service, provides detailed data about the costs of major foodborne illnesses in the United States, including identification of specific disease outcomes for foodborne infections caused by 15 major pathogens in the United States, associated outpatient and inpatient expenditures on medical care, associated lost wages, and estimates of individuals? willingness to pay to reduce mortality resulting from these foodborne illnesses. It also provides stakeholders and the general public with a means of understanding the relative impact of different foodborne infections in the United States. Cost estimates of foodborne illnesses have been used to help inform food-safety policy discussions, and these updated cost estimates provide a foundation for economic analysis of food safety policy. ? New surveys on food safety practices. ERS launched an initiative to collect primary data on current food safety practices for produce growers and post-harvest firms to provide a baseline of compliance costs prior to the full implementation of the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). The surveys will be completed by NASS in January 2016, and ERS will use the data in estimating the potential economic impacts of FSMA provisions on the fresh produce and animal feed sectors. ? Consumers respond differently to foodborne disease outbreaks of different severities. A case study of pathogen-related recalls of cantaloupe in 2011 and 2012 suggests consumers? food purchase responses take into account the relative risk severity of specific pathogens. Information from news media apparently plays a role. Federal health and safety officials warned consumers away from cantaloupes in 2011 and again in 2012. The warnings occurred under similar market conditions but were for contamination by two different foodborne microorganisms that posed entirely different health risks. After consumers were informed about the risk with the higher fatality rate, the demand for cantaloupes fell and consumers substituted other melons. No such shifts in demand were evident under the lower fatality risk, despite more illnesses attributed to it. ? Establishments that bid on contracts to supply the USDA?s National School Lunch Program had relatively higher levels of food safety, as measured by fewer samples of meat testing positive for Salmonella, than other establishments supplying ground beef to the commercial market. In December of 2014, ERS published a report that examined the food safety performance of suppliers of ground beef to the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and found evidence of strategic behavior in which managers use information about their establishment?s past food safety performance to decide whether to bid on contracts to supply the NSLP. Research results from this report were presented at multiple briefings to senior USDA officials. Fiscal Year 2017: ERS studies the relationship among the many factors that influence food choices and health outcomes. At the household level, research focuses on food price trends, income, and individual characteristics such as age, race and ethnicity, household structure, knowledge of diet and health, and nutrition education. At the industry level, research focuses on the interaction among firms, consumers, and government programs and policies. Children?s food access, food security, and child and adult obesity continue to be important foci of the ERS research program. ERS research related to adult and child obesity includes approaches taken from behavioral economics to investigate how psychological mechanisms related to food choices might contribute to poor dietary quality and obesity. Through its food assistance and nutrition research and by working closely with USDA?s Food and Nutrition Service, ERS studies and analyzes the Nation?s nutrition assistance programs. These programs receive substantial Federal funding and affect the daily lives of millions of America?s children. Long-term research themes include dietary and nutritional outcomes, food program targeting and delivery, and measurement of program participation. ERS research is designed to meet the critical information needs of USDA, Congress, program managers, policy officials, the research community, and the public at large. ERS food safety research focuses on enhancing methodologies for valuing societal benefits associated with reducing food safety risks, understanding consumer response to food safety incidents, assessing industry incentives to enhance food safety through new technologies and supply chain linkages, and evaluating regulatory options and change. ERS research also investigates the safety of food imports and the efficacy of international food safety policies and practices. Fiscal Year 2018: ERS studies the relationship among the many factors that influence food choices and health outcomes. At the household level, research focuses on food price trends, income, and individual characteristics such as age, race and ethnicity, household structure, knowledge of diet and health, and nutrition education. At the industry level, research focuses on the interaction among firms, consumers, and government programs and policies. Children?s food access, food security, and child and adult obesity continue to be important foci of the ERS research program. ERS research related to adult and child obesity includes approaches taken from behavioral economics to investigate how psychological mechanisms related to food choices might contribute to poor dietary quality and obesity. Through its food assistance and nutrition research and by working closely with USDA?s Food and Nutrition Service, ERS studies and analyzes the Nation?s nutrition assistance programs. These programs receive substantial Federal funding and affect the daily lives of millions of America?s children. Long-term research themes include dietary and nutritional outcomes, food program targeting and delivery, and measurement of program participation. ERS research is designed to meet the critical information needs of USDA, Congress, program managers, policy officials, the research community, and the public at large. ERS food safety research focuses on enhancing methodologies for valuing societal benefits associated with reducing food safety risks, understanding consumer response to food safety incidents, assessing industry incentives to enhance food safety through new technologies and supply chain linkages, and evaluating regulatory options and change. ERS research also investigates the safety of food imports and the efficacy of international food safety policies and practices.

Uses and Use Restrictions

ERS performs economic research and analyses related to U. S. and world agriculture that address a multitude of economic concerns and decision making needs of Federal, State, and local governments, farmers, farm organizations, farm suppliers, marketers, processors, and consumers.

There are no restrictions on the use of ERS produced information. The objective of the consumer data program is to enhance existing public and private data collection systems and availability to answer the most important policy questions.

This objective is achieved by: (1) supplementing existing government surveys with separate modules when possible, (2) integrating and linking data from disparate surveys, (3) investing in proprietary data, and (4) enhancing existing surveys.

Eligibility Requirements

Applicant Eligibility

Any individual or organization in the U.S.

and U.S.

Territories is eligible to receive the popular or technical research publications that convey the research results, although there may be a fee.

Beneficiary Eligibility

Any individual or organization in the U.S. and U.S. Territories is eligible to receive the popular or technical research publications that convey the research results, although there may be a fee.

Credentials/Documentation

No Credentials or documentation are required. This program is excluded from coverage under 2 CFR 200, Subpart E - Cost Principles.

Aplication and Award Process

Preapplication Coordination

Preapplication coordination is not applicable.

Environmental impact information is not required for this program.

This program is eligible for coverage under E.O.

12372, 'Intergovernmental Review of Federal Programs.' An applicant should consult the office or official designated as the single point of contact in his or her State for more information on the process the State requires to be followed in applying for assistance, if the State has selected the program for review.

Application Procedures

This program is excluded from coverage under 2 CFR 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards. Requests for technical information may be made to the Chief, Publishing and Communications Branch, Economic Research Service (ERS), 1400 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20520-1800.

Award Procedures

None.

Deadlines

Not Applicable.

Authorization

ACT: FY 2012 Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, Public Law 109-97, 7 U.S.C. 292, 411, 427, 1441a, 1621-1627, 1704, 1761-68, 2201, 2202, 3103, 3291, 3311, 3504; 22 U.S.C. 3101; 42 U.S.C. 1891-93; 44 U.S.C. 3501-11; 50 U.S.C. 2061 et seq, 2251 et seq. 2 CFR Part 400, 2 CFR Part 415, 2 CFR Part 416, 7USC 3318c.

Range of Approval/Disapproval Time

Not Applicable.

Appeals

Not Applicable.

Renewals

Other.

Assistance Considerations

Formula and Matching Requirements

Statutory formulas are not applicable to this program. Matching requirements are not applicable to this program. MOE requirements are not applicable to this program.

Length and Time Phasing of Assistance

Other. See the following for information on how assistance is awarded/released: Other.

Post Assistance Requirements

Reports

Progress reports, financial reports, financial statements, and inventions and subawards reports.

The frequency of reports is outlined in the terms of the agreement.

Cash reports are not applicable.

Progress reports, financial reports, financial statements, and inventions and subawards reports.

The frequency of reports is outlined in the terms of the agreement.

Progress reports, financial reports, financial statements, and inventions and subawards reports.

The frequency of reports is outlined in the terms of the agreement.

Progress reports, financial reports, financial statements, and inventions and subawards reports.

The frequency of reports is outlined in the terms of the agreement.

Audits

In accordance with the provisions of 2 CFR 200, Subpart F - Audit Requirements, non-Federal entities that expend financial assistance of $750,000 or more in Federal awards will have a single or a program-specific audit conducted for that year. Non-Federal entities that expend less than $750,000 a year in Federal awards are exempt from Federal audit requirements for that year, except as noted in 2 CFR 200.503.

Records

Financial records, supporting documents, statistical records, and all other records pertinent to an award shall be retained for a period of 3 years from the date of submission of the final expenditure report or, for awards that are renewed quarterly or annually, from the date of the submission of the quarterly or annual financial report, as authorized by the Federal awarding agency.

Financial Information

Account Identification

12-1701-0-1-352.

Obigations

(Cooperative Agreements) FY 16 $1,074,282; FY 17 est $1,100,000; and FY 18 est $1,100,000. (Project Grants) FY 16 $2,691,366; FY 17 est $2,700,000; and FY 18 est $2,700,000

Range and Average of Financial Assistance

No Data Available.

Regulations, Guidelines, and Literature

Not Applicable.

Information Contacts

Regional or Local Office

None.

Headquarters Office

Nancy A. Thomas 355 E Street SW, Room 5-254, Washington, District of Columbia 20024-3231 Email: NThomas@ers.usda.gov Phone: 2026945008

Criteria for Selecting Proposals

Not Applicable.


The Larder Cook School in West Lothian is a social enterprise that trains young people for a career in the food business. Recently, the school has launched a crowdfunder to help it teach another 80 students a year.




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