Reclamation States Emergency Drought Relief

Funding under the Drought Response Program will be provided to: (1) develop and update comprehensive drought contingency plans and (2) implement projects that will build long-term resiliency to drought.


Examples of Funded Projects

Fiscal Year 2017: This program funds collaborative Drought Contingency Plans that will help provide water managers prepare in advance of a drought.

For example, the Dolores Water Conservancy District in Colorado will develop a Drought Contingency plan in partnership with the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe Farm and Ranch Enterprise, and the Montezuma Valley Irrigation Company.

The plan will include the areas served by the Bureau of Reclamation's Dolores Project, located in southwest Colorado, which provides irrigation water for approximately 36,600 acres of irrigated land, provides municipal and industrial water to the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe, the tribal community of Towaoc, several other towns and cities, and serves downstream fish and wildlife purposes.

The Dolores Project suffered severe shortages (25%) from drought in 2013.

The plan will include a comprehensive evaluation of mitigation and response actions to reduce water shortages and improve drought resiliency for water users through collaboration with local agricultural districts, tribal farmers, municipal and industrial users, non-governmental organizations, and Federal and state agencies This program also funds Drought Resiliency Projects that help provide water managers with flexibility during periods of drought.

For example, in Arizona, the City of Phoenix, will purchase components for a well as part of an Aquifer Storage and Recovery Well Restoration project at their Deer Valley Water Treatment plant.

The City will construct a dual-purpose well that will directly inject under-utilized surface water supplies into the aquifer for later withdrawal during times of drought.

The City, which services more than 1.5 million residents, is currently experiencing drought conditions.

This project enables the City to maintain a supply of surplus water while offering operational flexibility during times of drought.

The City estimates the groundwater recharge to be 2,400 gallons per minute, or approximately 3,874 acre-feet per year.

Fiscal Year 2018: No information available.

Fiscal Year 2019: No information available.


Agency - Department of the Interior

The Department of the Interior protects and provides access to the Nation's natural and cultural heritage, including responsibilities to Indian tribes and island communities. Departmental goals include resource protection and usage, overseeing recreational opportunities, serving communities and excellence in management.




Selected Recipients for this Program


RecipientAmount Start DateEnd Date
Round Valley Indian Tribes $ 670,101   2018-09-212022-09-30
Coyote Valley Tribal Council $ 279,480   2018-08-162021-09-30
Merced Irrigation District $ 720,489   2017-09-222020-09-30
Blue Lake Rancheria, California $ 287,500   2018-07-232020-09-30
Torrance, City Of $ 740,000   2017-09-222020-09-30
Inland Empire Utilities Agency A Municipal Water District (inc) $ 290,000   2016-09-162020-03-31
Torrance, City Of $ 287,000   2016-09-162019-12-31
Big Bend Water District $ 299,400   2018-02-082019-12-31
Stockton-east Water District $ 282,972   2015-09-222019-09-30
Alameda County Water District $ 739,000   2017-09-142019-06-30



Program Accomplishments

Fiscal Year 2017: In FY17, available funding was used to select 6 Drought Contingency Plans and 11 Drought Resiliency Projects. Fiscal Year 2018: No information available. Fiscal Year 2019: No information available.

Uses and Use Restrictions

Funding under the Drought Response program will be provided to: (1) develop and update comprehensive drought contingency plans and (2) implement projects that will build long-term resiliency to drought.

For further information, please contact the regional offices.

Eligibility Requirements

Applicant Eligibility

1) Drought contingency planning: Applicants eligible to apply for funding to develop or update drought contingency plans include: States, cities, or sub-divisions of a state or city; Indian tribes or tribal water organizations; irrigation and water districts, water conservancy districts and other organizations with water or power delivery authority located within the following 17 Western U.S.

States: Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota, Texas, Wyoming, Utah, and Washington; and Hawaii.

2) Drought resiliency projects: Applicants eligible to apply for funding for drought resiliency projects include: States, cities, or sub-divisions of a state or city; Indian tribes or tribal water organizations; irrigation and water districts, water conservancy districts, and other organizations with water or power delivery authority.

Applicants must also be located in the western United States or Territories as identified in the Reclamation Act of June 17, 1902, as amended and supplemented; specifically: Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Washington, Wyoming, American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, and the Virgin Islands.

Beneficiary Eligibility

General public; Federal, State and local governments; and Federally Recognized Indian Tribal Governments.

Credentials/Documentation

None. 2 CFR 200, Subpart E - Cost Principles applies to this program.

Aplication and Award Process

Preapplication Coordination

Environmental compliance for this program may be required depending on the scope of the specific project funded.

This may result in the need for an environmental assessment or environmental impact statement prior to the commencement of project activities.

An environmental impact statement is required for this program.

An environmental impact assessment is required for this program.

This program is eligible for coverage under E.O.

12372, 'Intergovernmental Review of Federal Programs.' An applicant should consult the office or official designated as the single point of contact in his or her State for more information on the process the State requires to be followed in applying for assistance, if the State has selected the program for review.

Application Procedures

2 CFR 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards applies to this program. Funding Opportunity Announcements (Announcement) are posted on www.grants.gov. Submission of a complete technical proposal and projects budget is mandatory by the due date identified in the Announcement. In addition, applicants must submit all applicable SF 424 forms referenced in the Announcement.

Award Procedures

Proposals received in response to the Announcement are reviewed on the basis of a competitive, merit-based review process, and are rated in accordance with the evaluation criteria stated in the Announcement. Reclamation will make awards to the highest rated proposals based on the amount of funding available each year.

Deadlines

Contact the headquarters or regional office, as appropriate, for application deadlines.

Authorization

Reclamation States Emergency Drought Relief Act of 1991, Public Law 102-250, 43 U.S.C. §§2201-2214, as amended; and Section 9504(a), Omnibus Public Lands Management Act of 2009, (Public Law 111-11), as amended.

Range of Approval/Disapproval Time

Varies depending on the type and complexity of the project.

Appeals

Bureau of Reclamation will provide information on why requests were not approved.

Renewals

Not Applicable.

Assistance Considerations

Formula and Matching Requirements

Statutory formulas are not applicable to this program. Matching Requirements: Percent: 50%. The Federal share of the cost of drought contingency plans and drought resiliency projects carried out under this Program shall not exceed 50% of the total cost of the plan or project. However, economically disadvantaged communities may request a financial hardship waiver of all or part of the cost to develop a new drought contingency plan or to update an existing plan. The non-Federal share of the cost of operating and maintaining any infrastructure improvement funded through this program as a drought resiliency project grant shall be 100 percent. MOE requirements are not applicable to this program.

Length and Time Phasing of Assistance

In general, drought contingency plans and drought resiliency projects should be completed within 2 to 3 years of award. Applications for plans/ projects requiring more time will be considered for funding only under limited circumstances. See the following for information on how assistance is awarded/released: Payment terms vary by agreement awarded under this program.

Post Assistance Requirements

Reports

Unless otherwise stated in the agreement document, recipients shall submit the following reports on an annual basis: (1) SF-425, Federal Financial Report; and (2) Program Performance Reports.

Upon completion of the agreement, recipients shall submit a final: (1) SF 425, Federal Financial Report; and (2) Program Performance Report; and (3) other specific reports that may be applicable to the agreement such as property inventories, and patent and invention disclosures.

Cash reports are not applicable.

Progress reports are not applicable.

Unless otherwise stated in the agreement document, recipients shall submit the SF-425, Federal Financial Report on a quarterly basis.

Upon completion of the agreement, recipients shall submit a final SF 425.

Performance monitoring is not applicable.

Audits

In accordance with the provisions of 2 CFR 200, Subpart F - Audit Requirements, non-Federal entities that expend financial assistance of $750,000 or more in Federal awards will have a single or a program-specific audit conducted for that year. Non-Federal entities that expend less than $750,000 a year in Federal awards are exempt from Federal audit requirements for that year, except as noted in 2 CFR 200.503.

Records

All recipients of Federal awards shall maintain project records in accordance with 2 CFR 200.333 Retention requirements for records. Financial records, supporting documents, statistical records, and all other non-Federal entity records pertinent to a Federal award must be retained for a period of three years from the date of submission of the final expenditure report or, for Federal awards that are renewed quarterly or annually, from the date of the submission of the quarterly or annual financial report, respectively, as reported to the Federal awarding agency or pass-through entity in the case of a subrecipient. Federal awarding agencies and pass-through entities must not impose any other record retention requirements upon non-Federal entities, except as noted in 2 CFR 200.333.

Financial Information

Account Identification

14-0680-0-1-301.

Obigations

(Cooperative Agreements (Discretionary Grants)) FY 17 $6,900,000; FY 18 est $3,250,000; and FY 19 est $2,900,000

Range and Average of Financial Assistance

Range is $ 35,000 - $ 750,000; Average $270,000.

Regulations, Guidelines, and Literature

43 CFR 12 and applicable Office of Management and Budget Circulars. These documents may also be obtained by contacting the Bureau of Reclamation Office listed below.

Information Contacts

Regional or Local Office

None.

Headquarters Office

Darion Mayhorn Bureau of Reclamation, Mail Code 84-51000, PO Box 25007, , Denver , Colorado 80225-0007 Email: dmayhorn@usbr.gov Phone: (303)445-3121

Criteria for Selecting Proposals

Drought contingency plans must include input and participation by multiple stakeholders. Plans will also consider uncertainties related to changing hydrologic conditions and identify potential drought mitigation and response actions to build resilience to drought. Drought resiliency projects supported by an existing drought contingency plan (e.g., an existing state, county, municipal, or other plan is acceptable) receive prioritization. Projects that are eligible for funding should address at least one of the following goals: 1) increase the reliability of water supply; 2) improve water management; and 3) provide benefits for fish and wildlife and the environment.



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