Wildlife Restoration and Basic Hunter Education

The Act provides grants to State, Commonwealth, and territorial fish and wildlife agencies for projects to restore, conserve, manage, and enhance wild birds and mammals and their habitat.

Projects also include providing public use and access to wildlife resources; hunter education and safety;

credit: Itchmo
and the development and management of shooting ranges.
Related Programs

Examples of Funded Projects

Fiscal Year 2017: FY17: California?s Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) used $245,016 of Wildlife Restoration funds to implement a four-year project to help establish a mountain lion conservation and assessment program.

Hunters have expressed concern that the mountain lion population is increasing and impacting deer herds by high rates of predation.

Conversely, other groups have suggested other factors (e.g.

habitat loss and degradation, vehicle strikes, habitat fragmentation, depredation take, etc.) are likely causing the state?s mountain lion population and genetic diversity to decline to a point that would threaten the population?s viability.

The establishment of a comprehensive mountain lion program will allow CDFW the ability to identify, verify, and/or address these concerns in a well-coordinated manner.

Colorado?s Parks and Wildlife initiated large-scale research project to evaluate the state?s moose herd.

Moose were captured in three different study areas in Colorado ? along the Laramie River (Northeast Colorado), the southern portion of North Park and in the Williams Fork drainage (Northwest Colorado), and near Creede and the Rio Grande Reservoir (Southwest Colorado).

Each captured moose was evaluated to document health and reproductive status, and fitted with a satellite GPS collar to track their movements.

Results from this study will provide valuable information for managing moose herds across the State.

Idaho?s Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) constructed a new 4,000 square foot Wildlife Health and Genetics Lab, replacing a 50-plus year old dilapidated, leased facility.

The new building includes office space, a multi-purpose conference/training room, genetics lab, wet lab, and state-of-the-art necropsy lab.

The Wildlife Health Program provides leadership for surveillance and management of wildlife diseases in Idaho, particularly those that can affect humans or livestock.

The new lab was constructed on IDFG property adjacent to the Fisheries Health Lab and Fisheries genetics building, providing increased opportunity for greater collaborative efforts and increased administrative efficiencies.

The $1.8 million dollar project was primarily funded with Wildlife Restoration funds plus match provided by Idaho sportsmen through license and tag fees, along with an important contribution from the State Permanent Building Fund.

Florida?s Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is building the Palm Beach County Shooting Park with Hunter Educations funds.

The surrounding area has some of the highest demand for hunter safety courses in the state.

Also, the J.W.

Corbett Wildlife Management Area is located west of the shooting sports complex, and has no place for hunters to sight-in their rifles or practice shotgun shooting.

The first phase of construction will include the rifle and pistol ranges.

The second phase will include sporting clays ranges, trap and skeet fields, and supporting structures.

This shooting complex will offer hunter education classes.

Partners on this project include the National Rifle Association, Palm Beach County, Fish and Wildlife Foundation of Florida, and South Florida Water Management District.

Montana?s Fish Wildlife and Parks used over $1 million of Wildlife Restoration funds to purchase 320 acres of prime riparian corridor habitat adjacent to the Fish Creek Wildlife Management Area in Northwest Montana.

The land purchase d 1.19 linear miles of stream habitat and associated wetlands from three distinct watersheds; Bear Creek, Trail Creek, and Winkler Gulch.

This habitat serves as a crucial connectivity corridor for game, as well as non-game wildlife species.

This purchase will provide high-quality access and recreational opportunities for anglers, hunters, and outdoor recreationists in Montana.

In Nevada, thousands of big game and other wildlife are killed each year by motorists on busy sections of highways and interstates that intersect critical habitats for wildlife.

Not only do these wildlife vehicle collisions pose a significant impact to wildlife populations, they jeopardize human safety.

The Nevada Department of Wildlife used Wildlife Restoration funds, in collaboration with the Nevada Department of Transportation, to build and monitor the effectiveness of a first-ever ?wildlife overpass? project along Highway 93 in Elko County.

Other studies have shown that these structures were immediately used by migrating mule deer, and there was a greater use by the overpass than a comparable underpass.

Most importantly, monitoring has shown these types of structures succeeded in removing a large number of mule deer from the roadway, making the highway safer for wildlife and motorists. North Dakota?s Game and Fish Department used Wildlife Restoration funds to do a comprehensive assessment of oil and gas development on mule deer populations in western North Dakota.

A primary concern with increased oil and gas development is the potential loss of important wildlife habitat along with indirect effects (such as traffic and noise) that might reduce suitability of an area.

Ungulates are particularly sensitive to human disturbances, but responses are variable among species and populations.

This study will identify of mitigation measures intended to reduce and avoid impacts to mule deer populations, and model the effects of oil and gas development on population dynamics of mule deer populations in western North Dakota.

Wisconsin?s Department of Natural Resources (WI DNR) used Wildlife Restoration funds for The Southwest Wisconsin Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD), Deer, and Predator Study - the largest and most comprehensive deer research project ever undertaken in Wisconsin.

The goal of this five-year study is to examine factors that could impact deer survival and deer population growth in southern Wisconsin including CWD, predation, habitat suitability, and hunter harvest.

Simultaneous studies will take place in areas with differing rates of CWD infection, which will help WI DNR better understand how CWD may, or may not, be interacting with other factors that impact the deer herd.

Uniquely, this study will directly estimate the abundance and distribution of deer predators (bobcats and coyotes) within the study areas, and examine their impact on deer survival and behavior.

Over 113 landowners have agreed to assist with this research, allowing access to their land for trapping and tracking.

Understanding factors that impact deer and deer populations is a high priority among deer hunters, county deer advisory councils, and wildlife managers in Wisconsin.

This project helps build trust with local communities and hunters, and ensures hunters can utilize our natural resources.

Fiscal Year 2018: The Program has not selected projects for funding.

The Program anticipates funding projects to restore, conserve, manage and enhance wild birds and mammals and their habitats and to provide hunter development and safety programs.

Fiscal Year 2019: The Program has not selected projects for funding.


Agency - Department of the Interior

The Department of the Interior protects and provides access to the Nation's natural and cultural heritage, including responsibilities to Indian tribes and island communities. Departmental goals include resource protection and usage, overseeing recreational opportunities, serving communities and excellence in management.

Office - See Regional Agency Offices.

See Regional Agency Offices.

Wildlife Restoration Region 1, Pacific Region (Idaho, Oregon, Washington, Hawaii, Pacific Islands) Heather Hollis, 503-231-6233 . Region 2, Southwest Region (Arizona, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas) Nicole Jimenez, 505-248-7466. Region 3, Midwest Region (Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio, Wisconsin) Jessica Piispanen, 612-713-5145.

Region 4, Southeast Region (Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Puerto Rico, South Carolina, Tennessee, U. S. Virgin Islands) Diana Swan, 404-679-7058. Region 5, Northeast Region (Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia) Tom Decker, 413-253-8502. Region 6, Mountain-Prairie Region (Colorado, Idaho, Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, Wyoming) Otto Jose, 303-236-8156. Region 7, Alaska Region (Alaska) Doug McBride, 907-786-3631. Region 8, Pacific Southeast Region (California, Nevada) Justin Cutler, 916-414-6457. Basic Hunter Education Region 1, Pacific Region (Idaho, Oregon, Washington, Hawaii, Pacific Islands) Barb Behan, 503-231-2066. Region 2, Southwest Region (Arizona, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas) Andrew Ortiz 505-248-7459.

Region 3, Midwest Region (Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio, Wisconsin) Fabian Romero, 612-713-5145. Region 4, Southeast Region (Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Puerto Rico, South Carolina, Tennessee, U. S. Virgin Islands) Diana Swan, 404-679-7058. Region 5, Northeast Region (Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia) Richard Zane, 413-253-8506. Region 6, Mountain-Prairie Region (Colorado, Idaho, Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, Wyoming) Otto Jose, 303-236-8156. Region 7, Alaska Region (Alaska) Doug McBride, 907-786-3631. Region 8, Pacific Southeast Region (California, Nevada) Justin Cutler, 916-414-6457.

Relevant Nonprofit Program Categories





Selected Recipients for this Program


RecipientAmount Start DateEnd Date
Fish And Game, Idaho Dept Of $ 2,775,000   2018-11-012029-12-31
Environmental Management, Rhode Island Dept Of $ 725,671   2020-01-012025-06-30
Environmental Management, Rhode Island Dept Of $ 514,198   2020-01-012025-06-30
Game & Fish Commission, Arkansas $ 0   2015-07-022025-06-30
State Of Delaware, Dnrec $ 87,640   2020-02-012025-01-31
Environmental Management, Rhode Island Dept Of $ 1,217,661   2019-09-012024-12-31
Fish And Game, Idaho Dept Of $ 675,000   2019-05-012024-12-31
Nebraska Game And Parks Commission $ 315,809   2020-04-012024-12-31
New Jersey Department Of Environmental Protection $ 300,000   2020-01-012024-12-31
State Of Delaware, Dnrec $ 168,750   2020-01-012024-12-31



Program Accomplishments

Fiscal Year 2017: The program receives and funds approximately 635 grant proposals annually. The project activities funded include: research, operation and maintenance, construction, habitat restoration, land acquisition, technical guidance, coordination and hunter education. Fiscal Year 2018: Program has not yet selected projects for funding. Fiscal Year 2019: Program has not yet selected projects for funding.

Uses and Use Restrictions

Approved activities include selection, restoration, rehabilitation, and improvement of wildlife habitat; wildlife management research; wildlife population surveys and inventories; land acquisition; coordination; development of facilities; facilities and services for conducting hunter safety.

Law enforcement and public relations are not eligible under the Act.

Eligibility Requirements

Applicant Eligibility

Agencies from the 50 States, the Commonwealths of Puerto Rico and the Northern Mariana Islands, and the territories of Guam, the U.S.

Virgin Islands, and American Samoa with primary responsibility for fish and wildlife conservation may submit grant proposals to the Fish and Wildlife Service.

To be eligible, they must pass assent legislation to the provisions of the Act for conservation of wildlife that includes a prohibition against the diversion of license fees paid by hunters for any other purpose than the administration of the fish and wildlife agency.

Beneficiary Eligibility

General Public (While direct participation is limited to fish and wildlife agencies, the general public will ultimately benefit from these wildlife conservation measures.).

Credentials/Documentation

Each year within 60 days of the apportionment notice, States, Commonwealths, and territories must notify the Secretary of the Interior that they want to participate in the program for the year. The State, Commonwealth, or territorial fish and wildlife Director must furnish a certification of the number of paid hunter license holders. Allocable costs are determined in accordance with 2 CFR 200. 2 CFR 200, Subpart E - Cost Principles applies to this program.

Aplication and Award Process

Preapplication Coordination

An applicant should consult the office or official designated as the single point of contact in his or her State, the District of Columbia, Commonwealth, or territory for more information on this process when applying for assistance if the State has selected the program for review.

Environmental impact information is not required for this program.

This program is eligible for coverage under E.O.

12372, 'Intergovernmental Review of Federal Programs.' An applicant should consult the office or official designated as the single point of contact in his or her State for more information on the process the State requires to be followed in applying for assistance, if the State has selected the program for review.

Application Procedures

2 CFR 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards applies to this program.

Award Procedures

The Regional Director of the Fish and Wildlife Service or his designee approves or disapproves proposed grants. Regional Offices are responsible for notification of grant approval to the grantee.

Deadlines

Jul 01, 2018 July 1, 2018 Annually by July 1. Check with your Regional Service Office to determine any Regionally specific deadlines.

Authorization

Pittman-Robertson Wildlife Restoration Act, 16 U.S.C. ß669 et seq.

Range of Approval/Disapproval Time

Average 30 days.

Appeals

Regional Directors will consider differences of opinion concerning the eligibility of proposals. Final determination rests with the Director of the Fish and Wildlife Service.

Renewals

Grantees may renew projects on an annual basis if justifiable and if funds are available.

Assistance Considerations

Formula and Matching Requirements

Statutory Formula: Public Law 16 U.S.C. 669b. The program is funded by a permanent appropriation from revenues collected from taxes on bows, arrows, archery equipment, sporting firearm, ammunition, handguns, pistols, and revolvers. The revenues are deposited in the Federal Aid to Wildlife Restoration fund in the U.S. Treasury. These funds are annually apportioned according to the formula prescribed by the Act: 50 percent based on land area of the State, Commonwealth, or territory and 50 percent based on paid hunting license holders; no State may receive more than 5 percent or less than one-half of 1 percent of the total apportionment; the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico is apportioned up to one-half of 1 percent; and Guam, U.S. Virgin Islands, American Samoa, and Commonwealth of Norther Mariana Islands each receive up to one-sixth of 1 percent of the total apportionment. Section 4(c) Hunter Education and Safety Program Funds are formula-based apportionment based on State population. No State may receive more than 3 percent or less than 1 percent of the total Hunter Education funds apportioned. Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, U.S. Virgin Islands, American Samoa, and the Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands receive up to one-sixth of 1 percent of the total apportionment. Matching Requirements: Yes. Grant funds may be disbursed to States for up to 75 percent of the total cost of a project. Grant funds may be disbursed from 75 to 100 percent of the total project costs to the Commonwealths of Puerto Rico, Northern Mariana Islands and the territories of Guam, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and American Samoa. Each Regional Director decides on the specific Federal share between 75 and 100 percent based on what he or she decides is fair, just, and equitable. MOE requirements are not applicable to this program.

Length and Time Phasing of Assistance

Apportioned funds are available for obligation for a period of two years. Balances remaining unobligated after the period of availability revert to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Any funds not obligated within two years by a State, Commonwealth, or territorial fish and wildlife agency revert to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and will be spent under the provision of the Migratory Bird Conservation Act. In addition, under the provisions of the Wildlife Restoration Act, the interest accumulated by Wildlife Restoration account is available to the North American Wetland Conservation program. Funds are disbursed to recipients as requested and in accordance with the payment methods prescribed in 2 CFR 200, or as otherwise prescribed in program-specific legislation. See the following for information on how assistance is awarded/released: Program will include any specific payment terms and conditions in the notice of award.

Post Assistance Requirements

Reports

Recipients must submit a final performance report no later than 90 calendar days after the award end date.

Recipients of awards with performance periods longer than 12 months will be required to submit annual interim reports.

Program will detail all performance reporting requirements, including frequency and due dates, in the notice of award letter.

Cash reports are not applicable.

Recipients must report expenditures using the SF 425, Federal Financial Report form.

Recipients must submit a final report no later than 90 calendar days after the award end date.

Recipients of awards with performance periods longer than 12 months will be required to submit annual interim reports.

Program will detail all financial reporting requirements, including frequency and due dates, in the notice of award letter.

A Federal Financial Report SF 425 is required for each grant award annually within 90 days after the anniversary date and/or end of the grant.

Recipients are responsible for monitoring and reporting performance each award and sub-award under this program in accordance with 2 CFR 200 and 2 CFR Part 170.

Audits

In accordance with the provisions of 2 CFR 200, Subpart F - Audit Requirements, non-Federal entities that expend financial assistance of $750,000 or more in Federal awards will have a single or a program-specific audit conducted for that year. Non-Federal entities that expend less than $750,000 a year in Federal awards are exempt from Federal audit requirements for that year, except as noted in 2 CFR 200.503.

Records

Cost records must be maintained separately for each grant. Records, accounts and supporting documents must be retained for three years after submission of the Federal Financial Report (SF 425).

Financial Information

Account Identification

14-5029-0-2-303.

Obigations

(Formula Grants) FY 17 $142,628,785; FY 18 est $152,019,384; and FY 19 est $159,000,000 - Hunter Education and Safety (Formula Grants): FY17 $142,628,785; FY18 $152,019,384 ; FY19 $159,000,000. (Formula Grants) FY 17 $629,410,911; FY 18 est $637,010,140; and FY 19 est $667,560,000 - Wildlife Restoration (Formula Grants): FY17 $629,410,911; FY18 $637,010,140; FY19 $667,560,000.

Range and Average of Financial Assistance

Range is $268,000 to $7,187,000; Average $2,750,000.

Regulations, Guidelines, and Literature

50 CFR 80 contains the program regulation for this program. Matching and cost-sharing requirements are discussed in 50CFR 80.85 and 2 CFR 200.306. Applicants can visit these regulations and guidance at http://fawiki.fws.gov/display/WTK/Toolkit+Homepage.

Information Contacts

Regional or Local Office

See Regional Agency Offices. See Regional Agency Offices. Wildlife Restoration Region 1, Pacific Region (Idaho, Oregon, Washington, Hawaii, Pacific Islands) Heather Hollis, 503-231-6233 . Region 2, Southwest Region (Arizona, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas) Nicole Jimenez, 505-248-7466. Region 3, Midwest Region (Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio, Wisconsin) Jessica Piispanen, 612-713-5145. Region 4, Southeast Region (Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Puerto Rico, South Carolina, Tennessee, U.S. Virgin Islands) Diana Swan, 404-679-7058. Region 5, Northeast Region (Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia) Tom Decker, 413-253-8502. Region 6, Mountain-Prairie Region (Colorado, Idaho, Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, Wyoming) Otto Jose, 303-236-8156. Region 7, Alaska Region (Alaska) Doug McBride, 907-786-3631. Region 8, Pacific Southeast Region (California, Nevada) Justin Cutler, 916-414-6457. Basic Hunter Education Region 1, Pacific Region (Idaho, Oregon, Washington, Hawaii, Pacific Islands) Barb Behan, 503-231-2066. Region 2, Southwest Region (Arizona, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas) Andrew Ortiz 505-248-7459. Region 3, Midwest Region (Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio, Wisconsin) Fabian Romero, 612-713-5145. Region 4, Southeast Region (Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Puerto Rico, South Carolina, Tennessee, U.S. Virgin Islands) Diana Swan, 404-679-7058. Region 5, Northeast Region (Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia) Richard Zane, 413-253-8506. Region 6, Mountain-Prairie Region (Colorado, Idaho, Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, Wyoming) Otto Jose, 303-236-8156. Region 7, Alaska Region (Alaska) Doug McBride, 907-786-3631. Region 8, Pacific Southeast Region (California, Nevada) Justin Cutler, 916-414-6457.

Headquarters Office

Policy and Programs, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Headquarters, Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Program, Policy and Programs Division, 5275 Leesburg Pike, MS: WSFR, , Falls Church, Virginia 22041-3803 Phone: (703) 358-2156.

Criteria for Selecting Proposals

The State, Commonwealth, or territorial agency having lead responsibility for the management of their wildlife resources must submit the projects. The State, Commonwealth, or territorial agency selects those projects submitted for funding under the program. If approved, projects must meet the basic criteria outlined in the regulations and the Fish and Wildlife Service Manual.



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