Ozone Transport Commission

To develop or recommend air quality implementation plans for air quality control regions designated pursuant to Section 106 (interstate pollution) or Section 111 (interstate ozone pollution) of the Clean Air Act of 1990.



The Ozone Transport Commission (OTC) will continue to provide
a forum for the states within the Ozone Transport Region (New England and Middle Atlantic states) to develop and adopt air quality implementation plans for reducing ozone pollution pursuant to Section 106 of Section 111 of the Clean Air Act of 1990.




Funding Priority 2017
The OTC activities primarily further EPA?s Goal to Improve Air Quality by helping States develop state implementation plans that include collaboration and coordinated state-level controls as appropriate, while also working to reduce transport of ozone and ozone precursor pollutants into the OTR.

The OTC states continue to face a significant challenge in preparing State Implementation Plans (SIPs) for attainment of the 2008 Ozone NAAQS as well as the 2015 Ozone NAAQS.

These challenges are highlighted by the recent increases in monitored ozone levels.

With the more health-protective forthcoming ozone standard, the OTC has projected that the States in the OTR will face significant additional ozone attainment challenges, and will require a greater level of regional support and coordination from the OTC.

The member States rely on OTC outputs to meet their individual SIP obligations.

The coordinated and collaborative effort put forth through OTC?s committees represents the most efficient, cost effective and in certain cases the only possible means to assemble all the necessary elements of an attainment plan for OTC States.

Additionally, with the continued uncertainty surrounding resolution of ozone related transport under section 110 (a)(2)(D) of the CAA, OTC has and will continue to take a leadership role in coordinating with other Regional Planning Organizations (RPOs), contributing States and EPA offices to assist in resolution of this critical problem.

These State officials have primary responsibility under the CAA for achieving the nation's ambient air quality standards, including the standard for ozone pollution which is caused by oxides of nitrogen and volatile organic compounds (NOx and VOC, respectively) emissions within the region and ozone transported into the region from non-OTC States.

The Commission provides a forum through which States collaboratively develop and share air pollution inventories and analyses, and engage in developing harmonized regional ozone pollution reduction strategies.

Funding Priorities 2018
OTC will continue its goal of Improving Air Quality thru NAAQS Ozone Modeling (Including Emission Inventories.

The Modeling Committee facilitates the coordination of the photochemical modeling and emissions inventory work of the OTC States.

The modeling work begins with developing an emissions inventory of ozone precursor emissions for a base year, and developing a reproduced meteorological field for that same year.

The emissions inventory and meteorological field data are then processed and run through a photochemical model to ?predict? the ozone readings at air quality monitors.

These ?predictions? are then compared to actual data on ozone levels as collected at the monitors for the same period.

This is done to validate the performance of the model.

The modeling and emission inventory work in the OTC is coordinated by the Modeling Committee that ensures States are capable of completing the work accurately and on time.

Both the emission inventory and modeling work is decentralized across States and other planning organization, requiring considerable commitment of resources, coordination and oversight.

Ideally and with additional funding, these work efforts, including access to super computers and large data storage, would be funded in part through the OTC to the inventory and modeling centers in the States and universities.

Over the project period the Modeling Committee will pursue continued development and refinement of a photochemical modeling platform that performs according to EPA specifications on a timeline that follows: 1) EPA implementation timelines (to be modified with 2015 Ozone NAAQS that is more health-protective), and 2) State planning, rulemaking, and implementation timelines.

OTC will manage, support and facilitate the committee?s ongoing work to: 1) develop the highest quality base and future year projected emission inventories for photochemical modeling purposes; and 2) track ozone trends and transport patterns into and within the OTR.
Examples of Funded Projects

Fiscal Year 2016: The Modeling Committee facilitated the coordination of the photochemical modeling and emissions inventory work of the OTC States.

Developed regional models of ozone concentrations: Because ozone precursors and ozone itself can travel over long distances, projecting future ozone concentrations requires a super-regional model that encompasses most of the United States east of the Mississippi River.

Improved the modeling tools available: The OTC also works to improve the suite of modeling tools available in order to make the process of modeling quicker, more transparent, and more accurate.

Fiscal Year 2017: OTC has several workgroups to support their goals.

The Largest Emitters/EGUs Workgroup is compiling two reports on OTC, EPA, & individual state efforts to ensure (a) optimal operation of existing EGU controls, and (b) addition of controls to large uncontrolled EGUs inside & outside of the OTR for maximum NOX emissions reduction.

The Reports cover EGUs having no post-combustion controls, and those not running existing controls optimally, i.e.

EGUs with SCR & SNCR that emit 0.10 lb./MMBtu and 0.30 lb./MMBtu respectively.

The reports and workbooks will include Top 25 emitters with controls, Top 25 emitters without controls, Emitter Scorecards, Emitter Binning Analyses, State Regulations & Federal Consent Decrees, EPA petitions, and state legal actions.

The Control Measures Workgroup is developing recommendations & model rules for SAS strategies that states should consider in their Good Neighbor (GN) SIPs due in 2018.

The Workgroup is working on a ?Model Rule for Control of NOx Emissions from Natural Gas Pipeline Compressor Fuel-Fired Prime Movers? which include combustion turbines, and 2/4 stroke, spark-ignited, RB/LB reciprocating internal combustion engines that use coal, residual oil, or natural gas, and are located within the CSAPR U and OTR states.

The Workgroup is also working on recommendations for NOx emission limits for Cement Kilns.

The High Electric Demand Days (HEDD) Workgroup is addressing its 2017 charge, i.e.

to develop recommendations for an effective strategy to reduce NOX emissions on High Electric Demand Days.

The Workgroup is finalizing the whitepaper that includes enforceable Rule-Based Strategy for Boilers, Turbines, & Other Combustion Devices at Minor Sources, a Rule-Based Strategy for Non-Emergency Generators Powered by Reciprocating Engines, and a voluntary Outreach-Based Strategy that includes recommendations to reduce electric demand on poor air quality days.

The recommendations cover devices located within OTR that use coal, natural gas, residual oil or other oils.

The workgroup recommends an MOU, Statement or Resolution as an implementation mechanism.

The Mobile Source Committee (MSC) began its work fulfilling the charge given to it at the 2016 Fall Meeting.

The MSC followed developments with policies affecting aftermarket catalytic converters and developed a statement for adoption at the Spring Meeting calling on US EPA to update the federal program.

The MSC also continued work on recommendations on policies to reduce vehicle idling regionally, which included discussions with several more stakeholders and development of two brief surveys for two different trade organizations.

The MSC also developed another statement for adoption at the Spring Meeting concerning the adoption of stricter federal emission standards for NOX from heavy-duty vehicles and locomotive engines.

Finally, the MSC updated the success story document with information from the states on successful projects to reduce air pollution in the mobile sector.

Fiscal Year 2018: No Current Data Available


Agency - Environmental Protection Agency

The mission of the Environmental Protection Agency is to protect human health and the environment. Since 1970, EPA has been working for a cleaner, healthier environment for the American people.

Office - See Regional Agency Offices.

EPA encourages potential applicants to communicate with the appropriate EPA Regional Office listed in Appendix IV of the Catalog, and the Headquarters program contacts listed below.
Website Address

http://www.otcair.org/




Selected Recipients for this Program


RecipientAmount Start DateEnd Date
Ozone Transport Commission $ 1,278,000   2016-08-302018-08-31
Ozone Transport Commission $ 1,278,000   2014-07-012016-08-31
Ozone Transport Commission $ 1,278,000   2012-01-012014-06-30
Ozone Transport Commission $ 1,278,000   2010-01-012012-02-29
Ozone Transport Commission $ 639,000   2008-10-202009-12-31
Ozone Transport Commission $ 639,000   2007-06-282008-05-28
$ 400,380   2003-01-012007-12-31
$ 639,063   2006-07-012007-04-30
$ 635,000   2005-06-012006-03-31
$ 650,000   2003-06-132005-04-30



Program Accomplishments

Fiscal Year 2016: The OTC Modeling Committee continued to move forward with its work plan to fulfill the charge from the Commission from the OTC Fall 2015 meeting and assist the other Committees with modeling support. The OTC and its Committees activities have increased significantly given the nexus of continued development of recommendations to facilitate the work of OTC states to meet the 2008 ozone NAAQS, continued work to assist states on the 110(a)(2)(d) good neighbor provision of the CAA, working collaboratively on regionally significant national measures under development from EPA, planning for states and regional activities under the revised ozone standard finalized on October 1, 2015, and working collaboratively with states across a region encompassing the eastern United States. The Modeling Committee continued development and testing of the next generation, 2011 based, modeling platform. This platform corresponds with EPA's updated modeling platform and will use EPA data when appropriate to maintain consistency and reduce costs. The Modeling Committee has shifted its 2018 projection inventory development to include a 2017 projection year to support states attainment SIPs. The majority of the committee's work focused on processing the second version of EPA's emissions inventory for photochemical modeling. Work also began on the development of a technical support document for the modeling platform as well as documentation necessary for SIP submittal. Fiscal Year 2017: The OTC Modeling Committee continued to move forward with its work plan to fulfill the charge from the Commission to assist the other Committees with modeling support. The OTC Committees? activities have increased significantly since the revision of ozone NAAQS on October 1, 2015. In addition to the continuing development of recommendations to facilitate OTC states? efforts in meeting the 2008 ozone NAAQS, the OTC is continuing to assist states on the section 110(a)(2)(d) good neighbor provision of the CAA, working collaboratively on regionally-significant national measures being developed by the EPA, planning for regional activities under the 2015 ozone NAAQS, and working collaboratively with states across the eastern United States. The Modeling Committee continued the development and testing of the next generation 2011 based modeling platform. This platform corresponds with EPA?s updated modeling platform and uses EPA data, when appropriate, to maintain consistency and reduce costs. The Modeling Committee began work to assist states in SIP planning for potential ?bump ups? to serious non-attainment for the 2008 ozone NAAQS and for 110(a)(2)(d) good neighbor SIPs for the 2015 ozone NAAQS by developing screening modeling. The committee completed screening modeling and presented the results at the OTC Annual Meeting in June 2017. Fiscal Year 2018: No Current Data Available

Uses and Use Restrictions

Assistance funds may be used for costs specifically incurred in the conduct of interstate pollution projects in accordance with the purposes enumerated in the approved application.

Assistance agreement awards under this program may involve or relate to geospatial information.

Further information regarding geospatial information may be obtained by viewing the following website: https://www.epa.gov/geospatial. Grant recipients and sub-recipients are encouraged to adopt and enforce policies that ban text messaging while driving company-owned or -rented vehicles or government-owned vehicles, or while driving privately-owned vehicles when on official government business or when performing any work for or on behalf of the government.

Grant recipients and sub-recipients are encouraged to conduct initiatives of the type described in section 3(a) of the Federal Leadership on Reducing Text Messaging While Driving Executive Order that was signed on October 1, 2009.

Generally this program makes Federal awards on a discretionary basis.

For further information, please contact the Headquarters or regional office.

Eligibility Requirements

Applicant Eligibility

An agency or commission designated by the Governors of the affected States, which is capable of recommending to those Governors' plans for implementation of national primary and secondary ambient air quality standards and which includes representation from the States and the appropriate political subdivisions within the affected air quality control region.

For certain competitive funding opportunities under this CFDA description, the Agency may limit eligibility to compete to a number or subset of eligible applicants consistent with the Agency's Assistance Agreement Competition Policy.

Beneficiary Eligibility

Municipalities, intermunicipalities, States, interstate agencies or commissions, and Federally recognized Indian tribes.

Credentials/Documentation

The application must supply evidence of legal authority for air pollution control, evidence of the availability of non-federal matching funds, evidence that the Governor or his designated State agency has been given the opportunity to comment on the relationship of the program to be funded to the State plan and a workable program officially adopted for the agency. Principles for determining allowable costs are set forth in the Uniform Grants Guidance 2 CFR 200 of the Federal Regulations. Costs will be determined in accordance with 2 CFR 200. 2 CFR 200, Subpart E - Cost Principles applies to this program.

Aplication and Award Process

Preapplication Coordination

Discussions or informal meetings with the Headquarters Program Office concerning program preparation are advisable.

The standard application forms as furnished by the Federal Agency and required by Uniform Grants Guidance 2 CFR 200 must be used for this program.

This program is eligible for coverage under E.O.

12372, 'Intergovernmental Review of Federal Programs.' An applicant should consult the office or official designated as the single point of contact in his or her State for more information on the process the State requires to be followed in applying for assistance, if the State has selected the program for review.

Regarding pre-application/pre-proposal assistance with respect to competitive funding opportunities under this program description, EPA will generally specify the nature of the pre-application/pre-proposal assistance, if any, that will be available to applicants in the competitive announcement.

For additional information, contact the individual(s) listed as 'Information Contacts' or see Appendix IV of the Catalog.

Environmental impact information is not required for this program.

This program is eligible for coverage under E.O.

12372, 'Intergovernmental Review of Federal Programs.' An applicant should consult the office or official designated as the single point of contact in his or her State for more information on the process the State requires to be followed in applying for assistance, if the State has selected the program for review.

Application Procedures

2 CFR 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards applies to this program. Requests for application forms and completed applications should be submitted to the appropriate EPA Office (See Appendix IV of the Catalog). Applicants, except in limited circumstances approved by the Agency, must submit all initial applications for funding through http://www.grants.gov.

Award Procedures

Each application shall be subjected to administrative coordination to determine adequacy in relation to grant regulations, and to technical and program evaluation to determine merit and relevancy of the project. For competitive awards, EPA will review and evaluate applications, proposals, and/or submissions in accordance with the terms, conditions, and criteria stated in the competitive announcement. Competitions will be conducted in accordance with EPA policies/regulations for competing assistance agreements.

Deadlines

Contact the headquarters or regional office, as appropriate, for application deadlines.

Authorization

Clean Air Act of 1990, Section 106 and 111, Public Law 101-549, 42 U.S.C 1406.

Range of Approval/Disapproval Time

Approximately 60 days.

Appeals

Assistance agreement competition-related disputes will be resolved in accordance with the dispute resolution procedures published in 70 FR (Federal Register) 3629, 3630 (January 26, 2005). Copies of these procedures may also be requested by contacting the individual(s) listed as 'Information Contacts.' Disputes relating to matters other than the competitive selection of recipients will be resolved under 2 CFR 1500 Subpart E, as applicable.

Renewals

Applicant must reapply.

Assistance Considerations

Formula and Matching Requirements

This program has no statutory formula. Matching Requirements: Upon initial designation by the Governors of the affected States, pursuant to Sections 106 or 111 of the Clean Air Act of 1990, the Administrator is authorized to pay for up to 2 years, and up to 100 percent of the air quality planning program costs of a designated commission or interstate agency. After the initial 2-year period, the Administrator is authorized to make grants to such agency or such commission in amounts up to 3/5 of its air quality management plan costs. This program does not have MOE requirements.

Length and Time Phasing of Assistance

The terms of the grant shall be determined at the time of grant award. Method of awarding/releasing assistance: lump sum.

Post Assistance Requirements

Reports

EPA includes reporting requirements for grants and cooperative agreements in the terms and conditions of the agreements.

Agreements may require quarterly, interim and final progress reports, and financial and equipment reports.

Reporting requirements are also identified in the Uniform Grants Guidance 2 CFR 200. Grantees are required to submit program reports in accordance with Agency policy and the Monitoring and Reporting Program Performance requirements stated in the Uniform Grants Guidance 2 CFR 200.

Grantees are required to submit financial reports in accordance with Agency policy and the Financial Reporting and Financial Management Systems requirements stated in the Uniform Grants Guidance 2 CFR 200..

Grantees are required to submit progress reports in accordance with Agency policy and the Monitoring and Reporting Program Performance requirements stated in the Uniform Grants Guidance 2 CFR 200.

No expenditure reports are required.

Grantees are required to perform performance monitoring in accordance with Agency policy and requirements stated in the Uniform Grants Guidance 2 CFR 200.

Audits

In accordance with the provisions of 2 CFR 200, Subpart F - Audit Requirements, non-Federal entities that expend financial assistance of $750,000 or more in Federal awards will have a single or a program-specific audit conducted for that year. Non-Federal entities that expend less than $750,000 a year in Federal awards are exempt from Federal audit requirements for that year, except as noted in 2 CFR 200.503. Grants and cooperative agreements are subject to inspections and audits by the Comptroller General of the United States, the EPA Office of Inspector General, other EPA staff, or any authorized representative of the Federal government. Reviews by the EPA Project Officer and the Grants Specialist may occur each year.

Records

Recipients must keep financial records, including all documents supporting entries in accounting records and to substantiate changes in grants available to personnel authorized to examine EPA recipient grants and cooperative agreements records. Recipients must maintain all records until 3 years from the date of submission of the final expenditure reports. If questions, such as those raised as a result of an audit remain following the 3-year period, recipients must retain records until the matter is completely resolved.

Financial Information

Account Identification

68-0200-0-1-304.

Obigations

(Project Grants) FY 16 $639,000; FY 17 est $639,000; and FY 18 est $639,000 - FY 2016 - $639,000; FY 2017 - $639,000; FY 2018 - $639,000 (projected).

Range and Average of Financial Assistance

There is only one cooperative agreement awarded under this program. The cooperative agreement will range from $600,000 to $650,000/fiscal year with an average award of $639,000.

Regulations, Guidelines, and Literature

EPA Uniform Administration Requirements for Grants and Cooperative Agreements to State and Local Governments 2 CFR 200 and 1500).

Information Contacts

Regional or Local Office

See Regional Agency Offices. EPA encourages potential applicants to communicate with the appropriate EPA Regional Office listed in Appendix IV of the Catalog, and the Headquarters program contacts listed below.

Headquarters Office

Catrice Jefferson Office of Air and Radiation Environmental Protection Agency 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Mail Code 6102A, Washington, District of Columbia 20460 Email: Jefferson.catrice@epa.gov Phone: (202) 564-1668

Criteria for Selecting Proposals

The evaluation and selection criteria for competitive awards under this CFDA description will be described in the competitive announcement.



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