Training, Investigations, and Special Purpose Activities of Federally-Recognized Indian Tribes Consistent With the Clean Air Act (CAA), Tribal Sovereignty and the Protection and Management of Air Quality

Projects include providing comprehensive air quality policy and regulatory analysis consisting of support and national coordination activities to assist tribes in understanding, participating in and responding to US EPA's Office of Air and Radiation (OAR) policy and regulatory activities; ensuring American
Indian students, educators, and communities are properly informed of, and provided with opportunities to participate in, and pursue environmental careers in the field of air quality management; the American Indian Air Quality Training Program (AIAQTP), which includes workshop training, internships and technical support to tribal governments seeking to investigate, develop and establish air quality management programs for lands under their jurisdiction.

The AIAQTP program will also include outreach to local communities on air quality and related environmental justice issues and the development of a website to disseminate the environmental education curriculum.

The Student Program for Environmental Excellence in Design (SPEED) program aims to increase students' awareness and understanding of the environmental benefits associated with increased fuel efficiency, reduced carbon intensity in transportation fuels, and reduced emissions in advanced vehicles.

Through the SPEED, graduate-level students and senior-level undergraduate students in the science, technology, and engineering disciplines are provided opportunities to collaborate with the EPA and obtain research training on-site at the EPA's National Vehicle and Fuel Emissions Lab (NVFEL) in Ann Arbor, Michigan

Funding Priority for 2016

EPA and Tribes, in partnership, will protect public health, the environment, and unique Tribal air resources, consistent with the CAA, its Amendments, and EPA's trust responsibilities.

This program will ensure Tribes have appropriate levels of support and opportunity to understand their own air quality and take proactive measures to preserve, restore, and protect air quality for their reservations and other lands over which they have jurisdiction through CAA implementation, radiation protection, mobile source controls, and voluntary programs to address indoor and outdoor air, climate change and other concerns.

Activities will ensure that all Tribes have the tools they need to understand and participate in local, regional, and national issues and to protect their air quality from changes off reservation that may impact them.

Key activities include: (1) Training and Program Development - this area includes technical, administrative, and policy related training conducted in-person, on-line, and/or by any remote technological method supporting the enhancement of skills that contribute to development of tribal air quality management activities; (2) Assessment and Monitoring - activities related to assessment may include short or long term efforts to define, design, understand, and assess in a qualitative or quantitative manner (such as through an emission or source inventory) the impacts of air pollutants to human health, the environment, and items of cultural importance.

Monitoring includes numerous activities that gather data about the state of the environment and measuring the concentrations and potential effects of criteria and/or toxic air pollutants; (3) Developing capacity or a plan for eligibility under the Tribal Authority Rule - developing capacity includes activities that increase the experience and expertise of tribes to understand and assess air quality, including technical, administrative, policy, regulatory, education and outreach, communication skills, training, and building contacts, networks and experience.

Capacity includes carrying-out these programs and activities, interacting with the national air program and providing input, guidance, and perspective to efforts to develop policies, regulations, and guidance at the local, regional, and national level including reading, report writing, grant writing and reporting, budgeting, public speaking, developing presentations, preparing comments, editing documents, operating and maintaining equipment, and participating in meetings.

Developing a plan for eligibility under the Tribal Authority Rule (TAR) includes report reading and writing, grant writing and reporting, budgeting, public speaking, presentation development, comment preparation, document editing, equipment operation and maintenance, and meeting participation; (4) Delegation or Ongoing Capability Development - This activity includes developing technical, administrative, and management skills, knowledge, and abilities through experience, training, and education to enable activities such as reading and interpreting federal regulations, operating equipment, preparing and presenting technical information and reports, interacting with tribal communities and governments, federal bureaucrats and bureaucracy, providing outreach and education, public speaking, conducting public hearings, collecting and analyzing data, developing plans and innovative approaches to pollution control in a culturally sensitive manner; and (5) Tribal Implementation Plan development - tribes may conduct all aspects of air quality management at an advanced level, including developing lists of sources by category, conducting emission inventories and emission estimating, data analysis, analyzing, interpreting and commenting on administrative and regulatory requirements and activities at local, state, regional and national levels, developing advanced technical, policy and planning document preparation, developing an enforcement and inspection program, and tribal government representation

Funding Priority for 2017

EPA and Tribes, in partnership, will protect public health, the environment, and unique Tribal air resources, consistent with the CAA, its Amendments, and EPA's trust responsibilities.

This program will ensure Tribes have appropriate levels of support and opportunity to understand their own air quality and take proactive measures to preserve, restore, and protect air quality for their reservations and other lands over which they have jurisdiction through CAA implementation, radiation protection, mobile source controls, and voluntary programs to address indoor and outdoor air, climate change and other concerns.

Activities will ensure that all Tribes have the tools they need to understand and participate in local, regional, and national issues and to protect their air quality from changes off reservation that may impact them.

Key activities include: (1) Training and Program Development - this area includes technical, administrative, and policy related training conducted in-person, on-line, and/or by any remote technological method supporting the enhancement of skills that contribute to development of tribal air quality management activities; (2) Assessment and Monitoring - activities related to assessment may include short or long term efforts to define, design, understand, and assess in a qualitative or quantitative manner (such as through an emission or source inventory) the impacts of air pollutants to human health, the environment, and items of cultural importance.

Monitoring includes numerous activities that gather data about the state of the environment and measuring the concentrations and potential effects of criteria and/or toxic air pollutants; (3) Developing capacity or a plan for eligibility under the Tribal Authority Rule - developing capacity includes activities that increase the experience and expertise of tribes to understand and assess air quality, including technical, administrative, policy, regulatory, education and outreach, communication skills, training, and building contacts, networks and experience.

Capacity includes carrying-out these programs and activities, interacting with the national air program and providing input, guidance, and perspective to efforts to develop policies, regulations, and guidance at the local, regional, and national level including reading, report writing, grant writing and reporting, budgeting, public speaking, developing presentations, preparing comments, editing documents, operating and maintaining equipment, and participating in meetings.

Developing a plan for eligibility under the Tribal Authority Rule (TAR) includes report reading and writing, grant writing and reporting, budgeting, public speaking, presentation development, comment preparation, document editing, equipment operation and maintenance, and meeting participation; (4) Delegation or Ongoing Capability Development - This activity includes developing technical, administrative, and management skills, knowledge, and abilities through experience, training, and education to enable activities such as reading and interpreting federal regulations, operating equipment, preparing and presenting technical information and reports, interacting with tribal communities and governments, federal bureaucrats and bureaucracy, providing outreach and education, public speaking, conducting public hearings, collecting and analyzing data, developing plans and innovative approaches to pollution control in a culturally sensitive manner; and (5) Tribal Implementation Plan development - tribes may conduct all aspects of air quality management at an advanced level, including developing lists of sources by category, conducting emission inventories and emission estimating, data analysis, analyzing, interpreting and commenting on administrative and regulatory requirements and activities at local, state, regional and national levels, developing advanced technical, policy and planning document preparation, developing an enforcement and inspection program, and tribal government representation.

Funding Priority 2018

EPA and Tribes, in partnership, will protect public health, the environment, and unique Tribal air resources, consistent with the CAA, its Amendments, and EPA's trust responsibilities.

This program will ensure Tribes have appropriate levels of support and opportunity to understand their own air quality and take proactive measures to preserve, restore, and protect air quality for their reservations and other lands over which they have jurisdiction through CAA implementation, radiation protection, mobile source controls, and voluntary programs to address air quality, climate change and other concerns.

Activities will ensure that all Tribes have the tools they need to understand and participate in local, regional, and national issues and to protect their air quality from changes off reservation that may impact them.

Key activities include: (1) Training and Program Development - this area includes technical, administrative, and policy related training conducted in-person, on-line, and/or by any remote technological method supporting the enhancement of skills that contribute to development of tribal air quality management activities; (2) Assessment and Monitoring - activities related to assessment may include short or long term efforts to define, design, understand, and assess in a qualitative or quantitative manner (such as through an emission or source inventory) the impacts of air pollutants to human health, the environment, and items of cultural importance.

Monitoring includes numerous activities that gather data about the state of the environment and measuring the concentrations and potential effects of criteria and/or toxic air pollutants; (3) Developing capacity or a plan for eligibility under the Tribal Authority Rule - developing capacity includes activities that increase the experience and expertise of tribes to understand and assess air quality, including technical, administrative, policy, regulatory, education and outreach, communication skills, training, and building contacts, networks and experience.

Capacity includes carrying-out these programs and activities, interacting with the national air program and providing input, guidance, and perspective to efforts to develop policies, regulations, and guidance at the local, regional, and national level including reading, report writing, grant writing and reporting, budgeting, public speaking, developing presentations, preparing comments, editing documents, operating and maintaining equipment, and participating in meetings.

Developing a plan for eligibility under the Tribal Authority Rule (TAR) includes report reading and writing, grant writing and reporting, budgeting, public speaking, presentation development, comment preparation, document editing, equipment operation and maintenance, and meeting participation; (4) Delegation or Ongoing Capability Development - This activity includes developing technical, administrative, and management skills, knowledge, and abilities through experience, training, and education to enable activities such as reading and interpreting federal regulations, operating equipment, preparing and presenting technical information and reports, interacting with tribal communities and governments, federal bureaucrats and bureaucracy, providing outreach and education, public speaking, conducting public hearings, collecting and analyzing data, developing plans and innovative approaches to pollution control in a culturally sensitive manner; and (5) Tribal Implementation Plan development - tribes may conduct all aspects of air quality management at an advanced level, including developing lists of sources by category, conducting emission inventories and emission estimating, data analysis, analyzing, interpreting and commenting on administrative and regulatory requirements and activities at local, state, regional and national levels, developing advanced technical, policy and planning document preparation, developing an enforcement and inspection program, and tribal government representation.
Related Programs

Examples of Funded Projects

Fiscal Year 2016: https://www7.nau.edu/itep/main/ntaa/Resources/StatusTribalAir/.

Fiscal Year 2017: https://www7.nau.edu/itep/main/ntaa/Resources/StatusTribalAir/.

Fiscal Year 2018: No Current Data Available


Agency - Environmental Protection Agency

The mission of the Environmental Protection Agency is to protect human health and the environment. Since 1970, EPA has been working for a cleaner, healthier environment for the American people.

Office - See Regional Agency Offices.

EPA encourages potential applicants to communicate with the appropriate EPA Regional Office listed in Appendix IV of the Catalog, and the Headquarters program contacts listed below.

For information on grant applications and procedures, contact: Environmental Protection Agency, Grants and Interagency Agreement Management Division, 3903R, Washington, D.C.

20460.

For program information contact: Pat Childers, Phone: (202) 564-1082, e-mail: childers.pat @epa.gov.



Selected Recipients for this Program


RecipientAmount Start DateEnd Date
Pleasant Point Indian Reservation $ 90,555   2019-10-012022-09-30
Confederated Salish And Kootenai Tribes $ 41,730   2018-10-012021-09-30
Ute Mountain Ute Tribe $ 801,722   2016-10-012021-09-30
Northwestern Band Of The Shoshon Nation $ 343,552   2017-10-012021-09-30
Fort Peck Assiniboine & Sioux Tribes $ 19,585   2019-10-012021-09-30
Santee Sioux Tribe Of Nebraska $ 84,969   2019-10-012021-09-30
Little River Band Of Ottawa Indians $ 174,867   2019-04-012021-03-31
Little Traverse Bay Bands Of Odawa Indians $ 130,000   2019-04-012021-03-31
St Croix Chippewa Indians Of Wisconsin $ 120,000   2019-04-012021-03-31
Poarch Band Of Creek Indians $ 170,645   2014-10-012020-12-31



Program Accomplishments

Fiscal Year 2016: Program accomplishments of the tribes utilizing these funds can best be found in the annual Status of Tribal Air Report, which is a product of the National Tribal Air Association. According to this report there are 85 tribes operating Air monitors now, and 84 tribes with recently completed or updated Emissions inventories. 48 tribes have non regulatory Treatment in a Manner Similar to a State (TAS), while 10 tribes have moved forward with regulatory TAS. Fiscal Year 2017: Program accomplishments of the tribes utilizing these funds can best be found in the annual Status of Tribal Air Report, which is a product of the National Tribal Air Association. According to this report there are 85 tribes operating Air monitors now, and 80 tribes with recently completed or updated Emissions inventories. 49 tribes have non regulatory Treatment in a Manner Similar to a State (TAS), while 10 tribes have moved forward with regulatory TAS. Fiscal Year 2018: No Current Data Available

Uses and Use Restrictions

Grants and cooperative agreements are available to support recipient's allowable direct costs incident to approved Tribal air resources activities that will protect public health and the environment, plus allowable indirect costs, in accordance with established EPA policies and regulations.

Assistance agreement awards under this program may involve or relate to geospatial information.

Further information regarding geospatial information may be obtained by viewing the following website: https://www.epa.gov/geospatial.

Executive Order 12372 does not apply to the program. Grant recipients and sub-recipients are encouraged to adopt and enforce policies that ban text messaging while driving company-owned or -rented vehicles or government-owned vehicles, or while driving privately-owned vehicles when on official government business or when performing any work for or on behalf of the government.

Grant recipients and sub-recipients are encouraged to conduct initiatives of the type described in section 3(a) of the Federal Leadership on Reducing Text Messaging While Driving Executive Order that was signed on October 1, 2009.

Generally this program makes Federal awards on a discretionary basis.

For further information, please contact the Headquarters or regional office.

Eligibility Requirements

Applicant Eligibility

Assistance under this program is generally available to Federally-recognized Indian Tribes and Intertribal Consortia, which submit applications proposing projects with significant technical merit and relevance to EPA's Office of Air and Radiation's mission.

Tribal CAA 103 Project Grants have been determined by the Agency as exempt from competition under EPA Order 5700.5A1.

Beneficiary Eligibility

Federally-recognized Indian Tribes and Intertribal Consortia.

Credentials/Documentation

Costs will be determined in accordance with Uniform Grants Guidance 2 CFR 225 for State and local governments and Indian Tribes. Applicants may be requested to demonstrate they have appropriate background, academic training, experience in the field, and necessary equipment to carry out projects. EPA may ask applicants or principle investigators to provide curriculum vitae and relevant publications. 2 CFR 200, Subpart E - Cost Principles applies to this program.

Aplication and Award Process

Preapplication Coordination

EPA will generally specify the nature of the pre-application/pre-proposal assistance, if any, that will be available to applicants.

For additional information, contact the individual(s) listed as 'Information Contacts' or see Appendix IV of the Catalog.

This program is excluded from coverage under E.O.

12372.

Environmental impact information is not required for this program.

This program is excluded from coverage under E.O.

12372.

Application Procedures

2 CFR 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards applies to this program. EPA requires final applications to be made on Standard Form 424. Requests for application kits must be submitted to the Environmental Protection Agency, Grants and Interagency Agreement Management Division, 3903R, Washington, DC 20460 or through the appropriate EPA Regional Office listed in Appendix IV of the Catalog. Applicants, except in limited circumstances approved by the Agency, must submit all initial applications for funding through http://www.grants.gov.

Award Procedures

EPA will review and evaluate applications, proposals, and/or submissions in accordance with EPA policies/regulations for non-competitive assistance agreements.

Deadlines

Contact the headquarters or regional office, as appropriate, for application deadlines.

Authorization

Clean Air Act of 1963, Section 103, Public Law 95-95, 42 U.S.C 7403.

Range of Approval/Disapproval Time

Approximately 180 days.

Appeals

Disputes will be resolved under 2 CFR 1500 Subpart E, as applicable.

Renewals

None. Generally, EPA incrementally funds assistance agreements for Training, Investigations, and Special Purpose. Approval of subsequent funding increments is dependent on satisfactory project progress, continued relevance of the project to EPA's priorities, availability of funds, and Agency policies.

Assistance Considerations

Formula and Matching Requirements

This program has no statutory formula. This program has no matching requirements. This program does not have MOE requirements.

Length and Time Phasing of Assistance

EPA normally funds assistance agreements on a 12-month basis. However, EPA can negotiate the project period with each applicant based on project requirements. EPA limits project periods to 5 years. Grants and cooperative agreements are generally fully funded or on an incremental funding basis. Successful applicants will be notified either via U.S. mail or electronically. See the following for information on how assistance is awarded/released: Assistance agreements are fully funded (lump sum) or incrementally (quarterly) funded.

Post Assistance Requirements

Reports

EPA includes reporting requirements for grants and cooperative agreements in the terms and conditions of the agreements.

Agreements may require quarterly, interim, and final progress reports, and financial, equipment, and invention reports.

Reporting requirements are also identified in the Uniform Grants Guidance 2 CFR 200, as applicable.

Grantees are required to submit program reports in accordance with Agency policy and the Monitoring and Reporting Program Performance requirements stated in the Uniform Grants Guidance 2 CFR 200.

Grantees are required to submit financial reports in accordance with Agency policy and the Financial Reporting and Financial Management Systems requirements stated in the Uniform Grants Guidance 2 CFR 200.

Grantees are required to submit progress reports in accordance with Agency policy and the Monitoring and Reporting Program Performance requirements stated in the Uniform Grants Guidance 2 CFR 200.

No expenditure reports are required.

Grantees are required to perform performance monitoring in accordance with Agency policy and requirements stated the Uniform Grants Guidance 2 CFR 200.

Audits

In accordance with the provisions of 2 CFR 200, Subpart F - Audit Requirements, non-Federal entities that expend financial assistance of $750,000 or more in Federal awards will have a single or a program-specific audit conducted for that year. Non-Federal entities that expend less than $750,000 a year in Federal awards are exempt from Federal audit requirements for that year, except as noted in 2 CFR 200.503. Grants and cooperative agreements are subject to inspections and audits by the Comptroller General of the United States, the EPA Office of Inspector General, other EPA staff, or any authorized representative of the Federal government. Reviews by the EPA Project Officer and the Grants Specialist may occur each year.

Records

Recipients are subject to the retention and access requirements for records under 2 CFR 1500.6. Recipients must keep financial records, including all documents supporting entries on accounting records and to substantiate changes in grants available to personnel authorized to examine EPA recipients' grant and cooperative agreement records. Recipients must maintain all records until 3 years from the date of submission of final expenditure reports. If questions, such as those raised as a result of audits remain following the 3-year period, recipients must retain records until the matter is completely resolved.

Financial Information

Account Identification

68-0103-0-1-304; 68-0108-0-1-304; 68-0107-0-1-304.

Obigations

(Project Grants) FY 16 $12,712,000; FY 17 est $12,712,000; and FY 18 est $12,712,000 - FY 2016 - $12,712,000; FY 2017 - $12,712,000; FY 2018 - $12,712,000(Projected).

Range and Average of Financial Assistance

There is no minimum amount of assistance; the maximum is $7,750,000. The general range of the amount of assistance is $25,000 to $500,000. The average is $75,000.

Regulations, Guidelines, and Literature

Training, Investigations, and Special Purpose grants and cooperative agreements are subject to Uniform Grants Guidance 2 CFR 200. Costs will be determined in accordance with Uniform Grants Guidance 2 CFR 220 Subpart E-Cost principles

Information Contacts

Regional or Local Office

See Regional Agency Offices. EPA encourages potential applicants to communicate with the appropriate EPA Regional Office listed in Appendix IV of the Catalog, and the Headquarters program contacts listed below. For information on grant applications and procedures, contact: Environmental Protection Agency, Grants and Interagency Agreement Management Division, 3903R, Washington, D.C. 20460. For program information contact: Pat Childers, Phone: (202) 564-1082, e-mail: childers.pat @epa.gov.

Headquarters Office

Pat Childers USEPA Headquarters Ariel Rios Building 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N. W. MC 6103A, Washington, District of Columbia 20460 Email: childers.pat@epa.gov Phone: (202) 564-1082

Criteria for Selecting Proposals

Applications and proposals are selected for funding based on factors such as relevancy to EPA's mission, technical merit, and the likelihood of success. Tribal CAA 103 Project Grants have been determined exempt from competition under EPA Order 5700.5A1.



Social Entrepreneurship
Spotlight



Social Enterprise Blooms for Good Cause


Social Enterprise Blooms for Good Cause

Hope Blooms is a social enterprise comprising of young entrepreneurs from north-end Halifax, Canada. It started as a community garden where  students planted seeds and tended crops in an abandoned property in their neighborhood.




Human Services Jobs in Arkansas

  Program Director Jobs
  Foundation Related Jobs
  Substance Abuse Jobs
  Social Services Jobs
  Fundraising & Development Jobs





More Federal Domestic Assistance Programs


Tribal Public Health Capacity Building and Quality Improvement Umbrella Cooperative Agreement | Public Health Emergency Preparedness | Lake Mead/Las Vegas Wash  | Overseas Refugee Assistance Program for Near East | Farm Business Management and Benchmarking Competitive Grants Program |  Site Style by YAML | Grants.gov | Grants | Grants News | Sitemap | Privacy Policy


Edited by: Michael Saunders

© 2004-2020 Copyright Michael Saunders