Puget Sound Action Agenda: Technical Investigations and Implementation Assistance Program

Puget Sound has been designated as one of 28 estuaries of National Significance under section 320 of the Clean Water Act.

The goal of the National Estuary Program is to attain and maintain water quality in designated estuaries that will assure protection of public water supplies and the protection
and propagation of a balanced, indigenous population of shellfish, fish and wildlife and allows recreational activities in and on the water.

The Puget Sound National Estuary Program's approved Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan (CCMP), the Action Agenda, has a goal to restore and maintain the Puget Sound Estuary's environment by meeting 2020 ecosystem targets.




The EPA is committed to protecting and improving water quality and minimizing the adverse impacts of rapid development in the Puget Sound Basin.

These commitments include protecting the watersheds and waters of Puget Sound by protecting the fundamental watershed processes that provide and create aquatic habitats and by reducing the generation and release of toxic, nutrient and pathogen pollution.

This program has the following main objectives:

First, implementing the approved CCMP, the Action Agenda for Puget Sound, is the primary objective of this program.

Funds are directed to the highest priority work as articulated in biennial updates to the Action Agenda work plan.

The updated biennial work plan identifies specific near term actions to achieve reductions in the harmful impacts on Puget Sound and restore previously damaged aquatic ecosystem functions.

A central component of the approved CCMP for Puget Sound is its Biennial Science Work plan which identifies some of the core scientific work that must be completed in order for Action Agenda implementation efforts to succeed.

This program is to support implementation of priority near term actions and to support the technical studies and investigations that are needed to help direct implementation priorities.




Second, the Scientific Studies and Technical Investigations awards through this program will help support the tracking systems and evaluation approaches for implementation activities.

Together with projects aimed at achievement of specific environmental outcomes, the science studies and technical investigations inform adaptive management of the program significantly contributing to the restoration and protection of Puget Sound by 2020.


Specific areas of focus for Puget Sound protection and restoration were identified in 2010 as Toxics and Nutrients, Pathogens, Marine Nearshore, Watershed Protection, and Management of Implementation of the Action Agenda.

These areas of work were funded through FY2015 by awards to lead organizations in the areas of focus.



Funding Priority - Fiscal Year 2015: No new solicitations for FFY2015 funding were conducted for these areas under the Scientific Studies and Technical Investigations program.


Priorities for the five Lead Organization awards FFY2010 through FFY2015 include:


Nearshore and Marine Lead Organization; Protecting habitat through promoting effective regulation of marine and nearshore areas; Enhancing enforcement of and compliance with regulations governing habitat alteration, including shoreline modification; Restoring habitat, including shorelines, estuaries, and feeder bluffs/drift cell function; Developing programs to reduce shoreline armoring and, where armoring is needed, promote soft armoring techniques to achieve a net gain of unarmored shoreline.

Funding for chemical analyses for Toxics in Fish Vital Signs.


Watersheds (for stormwater): Focus on protection and restoration of floodplains, stream shorelines, riparian areas and primary creeks; Focus on levees and flood revetments; Enforcement of Critical Area Ordinances; Address stormwater impacts to the hydrological regime by working with local government to limit impervious surface and manage flows; Work with local governments to develop ecosystem service markets (placing value on ecosystem services and functions); Stormwater facility design and prioritization; establishment of permanent conservation easements.


Toxics and Nutrients Lead Organization: Implement key findings from the Toxics Loading Study to prevent and reduce toxic loadings to Puget Sound; Implement key findings from Ecology reports on nutrient programs in Puget Sound and address sources of nutrients on agricultural lands; Support of the Governor's Blue Ribbon Panel on Ocean Acidification.


Pathogens Lead Organization: Focus on recoverable shellfish beds; Work with local governments to create effective ordinances and enforcement programs; Develop sustainable funding in each health district for on-site septic system (OSSS) repair and maintenance programs; Complete no discharge zone designation.


Management of Action Agenda Implementation Lead Organization: Funding in support of the habitat-related efforts of the Northwest Straits Commission; Direct funding for Local Integrating Organization habitat protection and restoration projects; Integration of science into the CCMP, performance management, monitoring, and managing the required matching funds provided by the Management Conference.



Funding Priority - Fiscal Year 2016: No new solicitations for FFY2016 funding were conducted for these areas under the Scientific Studies and Technical Investigations program.


Priorities for the five Lead Organization awards FFY2010 through FFY2016 include:


Nearshore and Marine Lead Organization; Protecting habitat through promoting effective regulation of marine and nearshore areas; Enhancing enforcement of and compliance with regulations governing habitat alteration, including shoreline modification; Restoring habitat, including shorelines, estuaries, and feeder bluffs/drift cell function; Developing programs to reduce shoreline armoring and, where armoring is needed, promote soft armoring techniques to achieve a net gain of unarmored shoreline.

Funding for chemical analyses for Toxics in Fish Vital Signs.


Watersheds (for stormwater): Focus on protection and restoration of floodplains, stream shorelines, riparian areas and primary creeks; Focus on levees and flood revetments; Enforcement of Critical Area Ordinances; Address stormwater impacts to the hydrological regime by working with local government to limit impervious surface and manage flows; Work with local governments to develop ecosystem service markets (placing value on ecosystem services and functions); Stormwater facility design and prioritization; establishment of permanent conservation easements.


Toxics and Nutrients Lead Organization: Implement key findings from the Toxics Loading Study to prevent and reduce toxic loadings to Puget Sound; Implement key findings from Ecology reports on nutrient programs in Puget Sound and address sources of nutrients on agricultural lands; Support of the Governor's Blue Ribbon Panel on Ocean Acidification.


Pathogens Lead Organization: Focus on recoverable shellfish beds; Work with local governments to create effective ordinances and enforcement programs; Develop sustainable funding in each health district for on-site septic system (OSSS) repair and maintenance programs; Complete no discharge zone designation.


Management of Action Agenda Implementation Lead Organization: Direct funding for local habitat protection and restoration projects; Integration of science into the CCMP, performance management, monitoring, and managing the required matching funds provided by the Management Conference.


Beginning in FFY2016, a greater emphasis on direct implementation of near term actions, including Tribal and local priorities, will be the focus of the updated Action Agenda and the Puget Sound Program.

Priority will be given to actions that fall in the three strategic initiatives of the Action Agenda and have been scientifically and technically reviewed for the likelihood of positive results to achieve targeted environmental outcomes.

The three strategic initiative areas in the Action Agenda are: habitat protection and restoration for salmon and other Puget Sound aquatic species; water quality improvements to protect and improve shellfish growing areas; and control and prevention of pollution from stormwater.

An RFP was issued to award FFY16 funding for these strategic initiative leads.


Also an RFP was issued to award FFY16 funding to provide support and coordination assistance to the Puget Sound National Estuary Management Conference and the Action Agenda Strategic Initiative Leads and their Teams and the Tribal Lead Organization to develop Implementation Strategies to achieve environmental results and progress related to the Puget Sound Action Agenda Vital Signs.

Other activities of support include regional coordination of stewardship and social marketing, bridging of local activities and the regional recovery strategy, and other identified management conference support activities.



Funding Priority - Fiscal Year 2017: Continuing in FFY2017, a greater emphasis on direct implementation of near term actions, including Tribal and local priorities, will be the focus of the updated Action Agenda and the Puget Sound Program.

Priority will be given to actions that fall in the three strategic initiatives of the Action Agenda and have been scientifically and technically reviewed for the likelihood of positive results to achieve targeted environmental outcomes.

The three strategic initiative areas in the Action Agenda are: habitat protection and restoration for salmon and other Puget Sound aquatic species; water quality improvements to protect and improve shellfish growing areas; and control and prevention of pollution from stormwater.

Depending on FFY2017 appropriations, funding will be continued for these three strategic initiative leads.


Depending on FFY2017 appropriations, funding will be continued to provide support and coordination assistance to the Puget Sound National Estuary Management Conference and the Action Agenda Strategic Initiative Leads and their Teams and the Tribal Lead Organization to develop Implementation Strategies to achieve environmental results and progress related to the Puget Sound Action Agenda Vital Signs.

Other activities of support include regional coordination of stewardship and social marketing, bridging of local activities and the regional recovery strategy, and other identified management conference support activities.

Agency - Environmental Protection Agency

The mission of the Environmental Protection Agency is to protect human health and the environment. Since 1970, EPA has been working for a cleaner, healthier environment for the American people.

Office - See Regional Agency Offices.

Angela Bonifaci, Team Leader Puget Sound Team Office of Ecosystems, Tribal and Public Affairs U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10 1200 Sixth Avenue, Suite 900, ETPA-086 Seattle, WA 98101 (206) 553-0332 or 1-800-424-4EPA, extension 3-0332 E-Mail: bonifaci.angela@epa.gov.



Selected Recipients for this Program


RecipientAmount Start DateEnd Date
Fish & Wildlife, Washington State Department Of $ 19,900,000   2016-05-092023-06-29
Health, Washington State Department Of $ 17,600,000   2016-06-012023-05-31
Ecology, Washington State Department Of $ 13,600,000   2016-06-012021-06-30
Puget Sound Partnership $ 3,065,878   2017-07-012021-06-30
Ecology, Washington State Department Of $ 10,739,662   2014-07-012021-03-30
Ecology, Washington State Department Of $ 5,395,000   2014-09-012019-12-31
Health, Washington State Department Of $ 5,165,000   2014-09-012019-08-31
Fish & Wildlife, Washington State Department Of $ 5,262,400   2014-09-012019-08-30
Puget Sound Partnership $ 11,002,800   2014-07-012019-06-30
Health, Washington State Department Of $ 15,487,586   2011-02-012018-01-31



Program Accomplishments

Fiscal Year 2015: See below for a few of the FFY2014-15 accomplishments under these Lead Organization Grants. Puget Sound is a leader in estuary recovery. IC2 Alternatives Assessment Guide. Seven states collaborated to produce the Interstate Chemicals Clearinghouse (IC2) Alternatives Assessment Guide, a methodology to identify harmful toxins in the manufacturing process and replace them with less harmful alternatives. (Toxics and nutrients prevention, reduction and control) NW Green Chemistry - Northwest Green Chemistry, established in large part through National Estuary Program funding, offers technical assistance to Washington companies interested in participating in the Safer Choice Program. The program helps consumers and businesses find products that are safer for families, workplaces, communities and the environment. In 2015, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) named the Washington State Department of Ecology and Northwest Green Chemistry as a Safer Choice Partner of the Year Award winner. (Toxics and nutrients prevention, reduction and control) The Puget Sound program has made real and systemic changes that support sustainable efforts towards recovery. ■ Integrated zoning and development mapping. To provide a common foundation for land use planning decisions and facilitate cross-jurisdictional planning, the Washington State Department of Commerce developed an integrated map of zoning and development across Puget Sound. This map includes permitting data which could be valuable for counties required to complete Building Lands Reports. (Watershed protection and restoration) ■ Shoreline armoring removal. Shoreline armoring is an important indicator of ecological conditions in Puget Sound. By 2020, the goal is to remove more armoring than is added between 2011 and 2020. The Washington State Department of Natural Resources is working with local governments, non-governmental organizations and landowners to remove seawalls, bulkheads and other artificial barriers between the water and the land, helping restore Puget Sound shorelines and make beaches easier to access for all. National Estuary Program funds are used to address armoring systemically, combining direct work with homeowners with scientific advancements that address armoring and on-the-ground armor removal and restoration. It is because of this systemic approach that in 2014, for the first time, more armor was removed from Puget Sound than was installed ? a hopeful sign of things to come. (Marine and nearshore protection and restoration; Watershed protection and restoration) ■ No Discharge Zone. Fecal coliform in shellfish can cause illness in humans. One source of fecal coliform in the Puget Sound is sewage discharge from vessels. In order to protect public health, the Washington State Department of Ecology researched a federal 'No Discharge Zone' (NDZ) designation for priority areas of Puget Sound. A draft NDZ agreement and petition were developed; over 26,000 public comments were received on the draft petition. If approved by the EPA, this would be the first NDZ in Washington State. (Pathogen prevention, reduction and control) ■ Onsite Regional Funding Program. There are more than a half million on-site sewage systems (OSS) in the Puget Sound Region. These systems are a valuable part of the region's wastewater treatment infrastructure. Like municipal wastewater treatment plants, OSS must be properly built, operated and maintained to effectively treat sewage, thereby protecting public health and water quality. Local health jurisdictions (LHJs) in the 12 Puget Sound counties implement comprehensive OSS management plans and enhanced operation and maintenance (O&M) programs to help accomplish this. Steering and Advisory Committees, made up of Washington Department of Health staff and representatives from the 12 Puget Sound counties evaluated the funding needs, key issues and optional funding mechanisms to develop strategic proposals to successfully establish and fund the two OSS programs in the Puget Sound region. (Pathogen prevention, reduction and control) Floodplains by Design. The Nature Conservancy's multi-benefit floodplain restoration program, Floodplains by Design, has leveraged $50 in capital projects for every National Estuary Program dollar invested. (Watershed protection and restoration) ■ Floodplains by Design. The Nature Conservancy's multi-benefit floodplain restoration program, Floodplains by Design, has leveraged $50 in capital projects for every National Estuary Program dollar invested. (Watershed protection and restoration) National Estuary Program projects are a smart investment, enabling Puget Sound communities to leverage resources wisely and support critical work few others will fund. ■ Progressive comprehensive plan updates. The City of Duvall used National Estuary Program funds to complete a comprehensive plan update. As a small city, the funding made it possible for the city to pursue a more progressive update than is typical. They created watershed overlays to help communicate resource needs to elected officials and the general public, which encouraged development of regulations and incentive-based programs to address those needs. (Watershed protection and restoration) Innovation is innate to the Pacific Northwest, and Puget Sound recovery is no exception. ■ Transfer of Development Rights: King County's Transfer of Development Rights (TDR) program is only possible because of National Estuary Program funding. The program prevents urban sprawl by transferring development rights away from rural and resource lands to the county's Urban Areas. The Cities of Shoreline, Mountlake Terrace, Tukwila and Tacoma are now completing feasibility studies for TDR and may soon negotiate an interlocal agreement with their respective counties. (Watershed protection and restoration) ■ New ecosystem services markets: Ecosystem services markets are still a relatively new idea. The development of some markets has fallen short because outside organizations were not ready to approve a grant recipient's work. The Nisqually Tribe and City of Olympia continue to work collaboratively to develop an ecosystem services market to purchase development rights and build a community forest to protect part of Olympia's aquifer. (Watershed protection and restoration) ■ New scientific tools to inform decisions: The innovative High Resolution Change Detection project uses interactive aerial maps to show site-level changes in land cover over time. The map's analytics provide information about why the land cover changed and measure the rate of change relative to Puget Sound Vital Signs, both of which can be used to track Action Agenda progress. (Watershed protection and restoration) Future success will be amplified by the capacity and social capital being built today. ■ Hood Canal Regional PIC Program: In Hood Canal, shellfish beds are hard-hit by multiple sources of pollution. Kitsap County has an exemplary record of addressing Pollution Identification and Control (PIC) issues, and is now partnered with (and helping mentor) Mason and Jefferson Counties and the Port Gamble S'Klallam and Skokomish Tribes to reduce pollution inputs to Hood Canal's shellfish beds. This effort is part of the Department of Health's PIC program, which is active in all 12 counties around Puget Sound and promotes collaborative efforts to identify and reduce the amount of pollution reaching shellfish beds. (Pathogen prevention, reduction and control) ■ Facilitating the use of best practices: Several Lead Organizations have provided technical assistance and mentorship around the region, and developed resources to expand the reach of this support: The Marine Shoreline Design Guidelines help identify the shoreline type that best suits conditions at a site A Pollution Identification and Correction Program Guidance to find, correct and prevent pollutants from entering Puget Sound IC2 Alternatives Assessment Guide to replace harmful chemicals in the manufacturing process A K-12 curriculum on ocean acidification The Northwest Straits Foundation held workshops for landowners, trained volunteers and provided free technical assistance to reduce shoreline armoring The Department of Ecology certified over 50 landscape professionals in best management practices to reduce toxic and nutrient loading from pesticides and fertilizers. Fiscal Year 2016: No accomplishments to report with this year funding since the incremental funding was awarded in late FFY2015. Fiscal Year 2017: No Current Data Available

Uses and Use Restrictions

The Puget Sound funds were appropriated by Congress in conjunction with the Clean Water Act for development and implementation of programs that will improve water quality, air quality, and minimize the adverse impacts of rapid development in the Puget Sound Basin, including activities linked to habitat restoration projects or controlling sources or nonpoint pollution. The assistance offered can be used to finance technical studies and investigations, as well as protection and restoration activities necessary to achieve environmental outputs and/or outcomes identified in the Action Agenda.

This Action Agenda implementation work can either be funded directly or through a Strategic Initiative Lead entity which could then fund subawards for Action Agenda implementation activities.

Funding may also be used to develop and carry out implementation strategies that map out steps to achieve progress and outcomes for a particular ecosystem target, management issue, or geographic area. Assistance can be used to finance work identified in the Puget Sound Partnership's Biennial Science Work plan.

Assistance may also be used to manage, monitor, oversee, or participate in the implementation of the 2020 Action Agenda for Puget Sound, including Tribal participation in the implementation and maintenance processes of the CCMP.

Assistance can be used to study, evaluate, model, plan, and prepare for the impacts of climate change on Puget Sound ecosystem protection and restoration activities.

Such assistance could include: studies to evaluate the impacts of climate change on specific activities; development of tools and models that can assist in understanding the impacts of climate change; implementation strategies that consider the impacts of climate change and increase the climate resiliency of projects; and specific modification and adaptation of design or construction components of projects to increase the climate resiliency of Puget Sound protection and restoration activities.

Additional information on use restrictions, if any, for this program, will be provided in each Request for Proposals published on the EPA Region 10 website. Assistance agreement awards under this program may involve or relate to geospatial information.

Further information regarding geospatial information may be obtained by viewing the following website: https://www.epa.gov/geospatial. Grant recipients and sub-recipients are encouraged to adopt and enforce policies that ban text messaging while driving company-owned or -rented vehicles or government-owned vehicles, or while driving privately-owned vehicles when on official government business or when performing any work for or on behalf of the government.

Grant recipients and sub-recipients are encouraged to conduct initiatives of the type described in section 3(a) of the Federal Leadership on Reducing Text Messaging While Driving Executive Order that was signed on October 1, 2009.

Generally this program makes Federal awards on a discretionary basis.

For further information, please contact the Headquarters or regional office.

Eligibility Requirements

Applicant Eligibility

Federal government agencies and Washington State government agencies are eligible to apply under this program. Public and private institutions of higher education located in the United States are eligible to apply under this program. Units of local government organized under Washington State law and located within the Greater Puget Sound basin are eligible to apply.

Also eligible to apply are special purpose districts, as defined by Washington State law at R.C.W.

36.93.020, including but not limited to, irrigation districts, and water and sewer districts that are located in or govern land and water resources within the greater Puget Sound basin.

Conservation districts located in or governing land and water resources within the greater Puget Sound Basin are also eligible to apply for assistance under this program. Watershed planning units formed under RCW 90.82.040 and RCW 90.82.060, local management boards organized under RCW 90.88.030, salmon recovery lead entities organized pursuant to RCW 77.85.050, regional fisheries enhancement groups organized pursuant to RCW 77.95.060 and Marine Resource Committees organized pursuant to RCW 36.125.010 and RCW 36.125.020 are eligible to apply if they are located within or their jurisdictions include waters and/or lands within the Greater Puget Sound basin. -Intrastate organizations such as associations of cities, counties or conservation districts in the Greater Puget Sound basin are also eligible to apply. Nonprofit nongovernmental entities are also eligible to apply.

Federally recognized Indian Tribes located within the greater Puget Sound basin and any consortium of these eligible tribes are also eligible to apply. An Intertribal consortium must have adequate documentation of the existence of the partnership and the authorization of the member Tribes to apply for and receive assistance.

Documentation that demonstrates the existence of the partnership of Indian Tribal governments may consist of Tribal council resolutions, Intertribal consortia resolutions in conjunction with a Tribal council resolution from each member Tribe, or other written certification from a duly authorized representative of each Tribal government that clearly demonstrates that a partnership of Indian Tribal governments exists.

Documentation that demonstrates that member Tribes authorize the consortium to apply for and receive assistance may consist of a Tribal council resolution from each Tribe or other written certification from a duly authorized representative of each Tribal government that clearly demonstrates that the Tribe authorizes the consortium to apply for and receive the grant on behalf of the Tribe.

An Intertribal consortium resolution is not adequate documentation of the member Tribes authorization of the consortium unless it includes a written certification from a duly authorized representative of each Tribal government. The greater Puget Sound basin is defined as all watersheds draining to the U.S.

waters of Puget Sound, southern Georgia Basin, and the Strait of Juan de Fuca. - For profit business entities, private individuals and families are not eligible to apply.

However, all of these types of entities could partner with an eligible applicant as a subawardee. - For certain competitive funding opportunities under this CFDA description, the Agency may limit eligibility to compete to a number or subset of eligible applicants consistent with the Agency's Assistance Agreement Competition Policy.

Beneficiary Eligibility

The direct beneficiaries would be the entities receiving the assistance. Due to the fact that the program is designed and intended to assist in the restoration and protection of the Puget Sound estuary, the ultimate beneficiaries will be the residents of the greater Puget Sound region.

Credentials/Documentation

OMB Circular A-87 has been codified at 2 C.F.R. Part 225. 2 CFR 200, Subpart E - Cost Principles applies to this program.

Aplication and Award Process

Preapplication Coordination

Regarding pre-application/pre-proposal assistance with respect to competitive funding opportunities under this program description, EPA will generally specify the nature of the pre-application/pre-proposal assistance, if any, that will be available to applicants in the competitive announcement.

For additional information, contact the individual(s) listed as 'Information Contacts' or see Appendix IV of the Catalog. This program is excluded from coverage under E.O.

12372.

The State of Washington has chosen to not participate in this review process.

Environmental impact information is not required for this program.

This program is excluded from coverage under E.O.

12372.

Application Procedures

2 CFR 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards applies to this program. For competitive awards, applicants will be required to submit application materials as described in the Request For Proposals. Applicants, except in limited circumstances approved by the Agency, must submit all initial applications for funding through http://www.grants.gov.

Award Procedures

For competitive awards, EPA will review and evaluate applications, proposals, and/or submissions in accordance with the terms, conditions, and criteria stated in the competitive announcement. Competitions will be conducted in accordance with EPA policies/regulations for competing assistance agreements.

Deadlines

Contact the headquarters or regional office, as appropriate, for application deadlines.

Authorization

Clean Water Act, Title 1, Section 104(b), Public Law 94-117, 33 U.S.C 1254(b); Clean Water Act, Title 1, Section 104(b), Public Law 106-457, 33 U.S.C 1254(b); Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009, Public Law 111-8; Clean Water Act, Title 3, Section 320(g)(3)(A)(ii, Public Law 94-117, 33 U.S.C 1330; Clean Water Act, Title 1, Section 104, Public Law 106-457, 33 U.S.C 1254(a); Clean Water Act, Title 3, Section 320(g)(3)(A)(ii, Public Law 106-457, 33 U.S.C 1330; Department of the Interior, Environment and Related Agencies Appropriations Act of 2010, Public Law 111-88; Clean Water Act, Title 1, Section 104, Public Law 94-117, 33 U.S.C 1254(a); Continuing Appropriations Act, 2011, Public Law 111-242; Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2012, Public Law 112-74; Continuing Appropriations Act, 2013, Public Law 113-6; Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014 , Public Law 113-76; Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2015, Public Law 113-235; Consolidated Appropriations Act 2016, Public Law 114-113.

Range of Approval/Disapproval Time

The Region expects that its review of the applications received in response to competitive solicitations will be completed within 120 to 150 calendar days following the deadline for the submission of applications for each Request for Proposals issued under this program.

Appeals

Assistance agreement competition-related disputes will be resolved in accordance with the dispute resolution procedures published in 70 FR (Federal Register) 3629, 3630 (January 26, 2005). Copies of these procedures may also be requested by contacting the individual(s) listed as 'Information Contacts.' Disputes relating to matters other than the competitive selection of recipients will be resolved under 2 CFR 1500 Subpart E, as applicable.

Renewals

Not Applicable.

Assistance Considerations

Formula and Matching Requirements

This program has no statutory formula. Matching Requirements: Matching Requirements: Clean Water Act 104(a) and 104(b) have no statutory formula for match; that is, no match is required by the statute. Therefore, for awards under this program to be made under these authorities, the EPA will not require any non-federal match by any successful applicant. If awards are made for development of a comprehensive conservation and management plan (CCMP) , or for general projects that implement the CCMP or that exercise management and oversight over the implementation of the CCMP, there will be a match requirement pursuant to CWA 320. For development of the CCMP, the federal share of a grant to any person (including State, interstate, or regional agency or entity) under CWA 320(g)(3)(A)(i), for a fiscal year shall not exceed 75 percent of the annual aggregate costs of development of a CCMP. For projects funded under CWA 320(g)(3)(A)(ii) the federal share of a grant to any person (including State, interstate, or regional agency or entity) shall not exceed 50 percent of the annual aggregate costs of the implementation of the plan. Under CWA 320(g)(2 and 320(g)(3)(ii) there is a statutory match of 50% of the total project costs. CWA 320 allows for an aggregate match; that is, the match requirement for federal financial assistance for national estuary program projects applies to the estuary's Management Conference as a whole. Thus, any spending of nonfederal funds by the Management Conference within a fiscal year can be used as match for federal financial assistance. The EPA expects to structure the Request for Proposals issued under this program so that applicants can identify expenditures of nonfederal funds on projects that implement the CCMP by themselves as well as by other Management Conference members as proposed nonfederal match for the financial assistance being requested. Contact the EPA Regional Office contact identified in this program description for more information. This program does not have MOE requirements. This program does not have MOE requirements.

Length and Time Phasing of Assistance

The assistance will be awarded during FFY 2010-2016. Funds will be disbursed to individual assistance recipients in accordance with the terms specified in the assistance agreement. Dependent on congressional appropriations, new funding will be available for FFY2017. See the following for information on how assistance is awarded/released: Assistance will be disbursed in accordance with the terms specified in the assistance agreement. Typically, assistance recipients draw funds at either monthly or quarterly intervals based on their incurred costs.

Post Assistance Requirements

Reports

No program reports are required.

No cash reports are required.

Progress report requirements will be a part of each assistance agreement.

A schedule of interim milestones and the outputs that will be completed by the end of the project period will also be included.

Typical progress reports will discuss the progress that has been made on each major task and on each interim milestone identified in the approved statement of work.

Progress reports will also discuss any difficulties or problems that have been encountered and how they have been or are being resolved.

Other specific reporting requirements will be defined in the assistance agreement based on the statement of work described in the application.

Expenditure reports will typically be required at the same time intervals as progress reports.

The expenditure reports will document expenditures to date in a manner that allows the report user to confirm that all assistance payments (disbursements to assistance recipients) are for costs that have been incurred in compliance with applicable costs principles and, for assistance agreements in which a matching contribution is required, the reports will also document expenditures of that matching contribution.

Recipients of this funding will be required to use EPA's Puget Sound Financial and Ecosystem Accounting Tracking System (FEATS), which is the primary mechanism for performance monitoring.

Key grant outputs will be tracked on a semi-annual basis through FEATS, as well as progress towards project milestones and deliverables.

FEATS provides linkages to EPA Puget Sound performance measures and Dashboard Indicators.

FEATS allows award recipients to share challenges, solutions, lessons learned, and reflections associated with their work.

Audits

In accordance with the provisions of 2 CFR 200, Subpart F - Audit Requirements, non-Federal entities that expend financial assistance of $750,000 or more in Federal awards will have a single or a program-specific audit conducted for that year. Non-Federal entities that expend less than $750,000 a year in Federal awards are exempt from Federal audit requirements for that year, except as noted in 2 CFR 200.503. Grants and cooperative agreements are subject to inspections and audits by the Comptroller General of the United States, the EPA Office of Inspector General, other EPA staff, or any authorized representative of the Federal government. Reviews by the EPA Project Officer and the Grants Specialist may occur each year. In accordance with the provisions of 2 CFR 200, Subpart F - Audit Requirements, non-federal entities that expend $750,000 or more in a year in Federal awards shall have a single or a program specific audit conducted for that year. Non-federal entities that expend less than $750,000 a year in Federal awards are exempt from Federal audit requirements for that year, except as noted in 2 CFR 200.503.

Records

Financial records, including all documents to support entries on accounting records and to substantiate charges to each grant must be kept available to personnel authorized to examine EPA grant accounts. All records must be maintained until expiration of three years from the date of submission of the final expenditure report. If questions still remain, such as those raised by an audit, related records shall be maintained until the matter is completely resolved.

Financial Information

Account Identification

68-0108-0-1-304.

Obigations

(Project Grants) FY 15 Not Separately Identifiable; FY 16 Estimate Not Available; and FY 17 Estimate Not Available - EPA awarded approximately $9.0 million for scientific studies and technical investigations in FFY 2011 from FFY 2010 funds based on one competitive solicitation. The projects are identified on an annotated list at this web page: http://www.epa.gov/pugetsound/funding/index.html#science The Region also awarded nearly $4.0 million in FFY 2010 funds to the University of Washington's Puget Sound Institute pursuant to Congressional direction in the FFY 2010 appropriation. The Region awarded $6,000,000 in FFY 2010 funds to the Puget Sound Partnership to manage the implementation of the Action Agenda, pursuant to Congressional direction in the EPA's FFY 2010 appropriation. The Region awarded approximately $3.1 million each in four awards to state agencies to lead Puget Sound ecosystem recovery efforts. Two of these awards were to the Washington State Department of Ecology to lead efforts for both 'Toxics and Nutrients' and 'Watershed Protection'. A third award was made to the Washington State Department of Health for 'Pathogen Control'. The fourth award was made to the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife for 'Marine and Nearshore Habitat Protection'. The Region awarded approximately $5.5m in incremental funding in FFY 2011 funds to each of these ecosystem Lead Organizations, totaling $21,600,000. In FY 2012, the Region awarded approximately $3,600,000 in incremental funding to the four ecosystem lead organizations and $3,000,000 for the Management of Action Agenda Inplementation Lead Organization, totaling ~$17,400,000. The watershed Lead Organization also received an additional $1,800,000 for stormwater retrofit project prioritization and design. FY12 funding totaled $19,200,000. In FY 2013, the Region awarded approximately $3,320,000 in incremental funding to the four ecosystem lead organizations and $2,800,000 for the Management of Action Agenda Implementation Lead Organization, totaling around $16,048,105. The watershed lead organization also received an additional, $1,200,000 for the riparian initiative. FY13 funding totaled $17,248,105. In FY 2014, the Region awarded approximately $2,490,000 in incremental funding to each of the four ecosystem lead organizations and $2,850,000 for the Management of Action Agenda Implementation Lead Organization, totaling around $12,810,000. The watershed lead organization also received an additional $2,861,520 for the establishment of permanent conservation easements, and the marine nearshore lead organization received an additional $91,400 for chemical analyses for Toxics in Fish Vital Signs. In FY 2015, the Region awarded approximately $2,490,000 in incremental funding to each of the four ecosystem lead organizations and $2,850,000 for the Management of Action Agenda Implementation Lead Organization, totaling around $12,810,000. The watershed lead organization also will receive an additional $2,861,520 for the establishment of permanent conservation easements, and the other lead organizations received supplemental funding for strategic initiative work. The Management of Action Agenda Implementation Lead Organization received supplemental funding for implementation strategy work, additional funding for the local implementing organizations, and funding for special projects. FY 2016 is planned for the new Strategic Initiative Leads: Stormwater - $5,200,000; Habitat - $5,200,000 - Shellfish - $5,000,000. Also $2,800,000 will be awarded to the new Management Conference Support for Implementation Lead Organization.

Range and Average of Financial Assistance

The EPA made awards for scientific and technical studies in the range of $200,000 - $700,000. Awards for implementation assistance and for managing and monitoring the implementation of the CCMP ranged from $200,000 to $6,000,000 each. Funding for the Strategic Initiative leads and the Management Conference Support for Implementation Lead will range from $2.490M to $5.500M. Some of these awards may be incrementally funded with appropriations from future fiscal years. See under #122 for more details on the funding for the specific year.

Regulations, Guidelines, and Literature

For grants and cooperative agreements with local governments, tribal governments and special purpose districts, the procedures and requirements should be in conformance with the OMB's Uniform Grants Guidance (UGG) located in 2 CFR 200 (Uniform Administrative Requirements,Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards). This supersedes and streamlines requirements from 40 C.F.R. Part 31 'Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Cooperative Agreements to State and Local Governments', and OMB Circular Nos. A-21, A-87, A-110, and A-122 (which had been placed in 2 CFR 220, 225, 215, and 230). 40 C.F.R. Part 35 'Environmental Program Grants-State, Interstate and Local Government Agencies' is still applicable.

Information Contacts

Regional or Local Office

See Regional Agency Offices. Angela Bonifaci, Team Leader Puget Sound Team Office of Ecosystems, Tribal and Public Affairs U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10 1200 Sixth Avenue, Suite 900, ETPA-086 Seattle, WA 98101 (206) 553-0332 or 1-800-424-4EPA, extension 3-0332 E-Mail: bonifaci.angela@epa.gov.

Headquarters Office

Angela Bonifaci Puget Sound Team Office of Ecosystems, Tribal and Public Affairs U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10 1200 Sixth Avenue, Suite 900, ETPA-086 , Seattle, Washington 98101 Email: bonifaci.angela@epa.gov Phone: (206) 553-0332

Criteria for Selecting Proposals

The evaluation and selection criteria for competitive awards under this CFDA program description will be published in each announcement of a competitive funding opportunity (e.g., the Request for Proposals or RFP).



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