Consolidated Pesticide Enforcement Cooperative Agreements

Used for Consolidated Pesticide Enforcement Agreements (only one with this one now) - State, territorial, and tribal agencies participating in this cooperative agreement program receive funds to support and strengthen their pesticide compliance programs, including pesticide compliance monitoring, inspection
and enforcement activities.



Funding Priority 2016

Grantees must conduct activities related to: (1) basic pesticide program; (2) pesticide worker safety: Worker Protection Safety; (3) pesticide worker safety: pesticide applicator certification; (4) pesticide container and containment regulations; (5) soil fumigation and soil fumigants; and (6) pesticides in water.

Grantees also must chose two additional programmatic areas from the following: (1) endangered species protection; (2) bed bugs; (3) pollinator protection; (4) spray drift; (5) state and tribal coordination and communication; (6) supplemental distributors; (7) contract manufacturers; and (8) imports.

These activities include inspections and observations at pesticide application sites to ensure user compliance with label directions and acceptable use practices; inspections of pesticide products at producing facilities and in the retail marketplace to ensure industry compliance with registration, classification and labeling requirements; and initiation of appropriate enforcement action when violations are detected including civil and criminal prosecution, stop sale orders, seizures, recalls and warning notices.



Funding Priority 2017
Grantees must conduct activities related to: (1) basic pesticide program; (2) pesticide worker safety: Worker Protection Safety; (3) pesticide worker safety: pesticide applicator certification; (4) pesticide container and containment regulations; (5) soil fumigation and soil fumigants; and (6) pesticides in water.

Grantees also must chose two additional programmatic areas from the following: (1) endangered species protection; (2) bed bugs; (3) pollinator protection; (4) spray drift; (5) state and tribal coordination and communication; (6) supplemental distributors; (7) contract manufacturers; and (8) imports.

These activities include inspections and observations at pesticide application sites to ensure user compliance with label directions and acceptable use practices; inspections of pesticide products at producing facilities and in the retail marketplace to ensure industry compliance with registration, classification and labeling requirements; and initiation of appropriate enforcement action when violations are detected including civil and criminal prosecution, stop sale orders, seizures, recalls and warning notices.

Funding Priority - Fiscal Year 2018:

Grantees must conduct activities related to: (1) Basic Pesticide Program; (2) Pesticide Worker Safety: Worker Protection Standard; (3) Worker Safety: Pesticide Applicator Certification; (4) Pesticides in Water; (5) Product Integrity; (6) Border Compliance.

Grantees also must choose one additional programmatic areas from the following: (1) Pick-List Program Area: Fumigation and Fumigants; (2) Spray Drift; (3) State and Tribal Coordination and Communication; (4) Emerging Public Health Pesticide Issues.

.

These activities include inspections and observations at pesticide application sites to ensure user compliance with label directions and acceptable use practices; inspections of pesticide products at producing facilities and in the retail marketplace to ensure industry compliance with registration, classification and labeling requirements; and initiation of appropriate enforcement action when violations are detected including civil and criminal prosecution, stop sale orders, seizures, recalls and warning notices.
Examples of Funded Projects

Fiscal Year 2016: No Current Data Available Fiscal Year 2017: State agencies participated in the federal/state cooperative agreement program received funds to support and strengthen their pesticide compliance and enforcement programs, including pesticide compliance monitoring, inspection and enforcement activities as well as special pesticide initiatives activities.

Typical program activities included inspections and observations at pesticide application sites to ensure user compliance with label directions and acceptable use practices; inspections of pesticide products at production facilities and in the retail marketplace to ensure industry compliance with registration, classification, and labeling requirements; inspections and investigations at ports of entry to assess compliance with import and export requirements; and initiation of appropriate enforcement action when violations were detected, including civil and criminal prosecution, stop sale orders, seizures, recalls and notices.

Funds also supported training activities.

Fiscal Year 2018: No Current Data Available


Agency - Environmental Protection Agency

The mission of the Environmental Protection Agency is to protect human health and the environment. Since 1970, EPA has been working for a cleaner, healthier environment for the American people.

Office - See Regional Agency Offices.

Contact appropriate EPA Regional Office listed in Appendix IV of the Catalog.



Selected Recipients for this Program


RecipientAmount Start DateEnd Date
Clemson University $ 27,477   2020-01-012022-12-31
Clemson University $ 24,343   2020-01-012022-12-31
Agriculture And Forestry, Louisiana Department Of $ 333,284   2019-10-012021-09-30
North Dakota State University $ 51,000   2019-10-012021-09-30
Agriculture, New Mexico Department Of $ 291,684   2019-10-012021-09-30
Confederated Salish And Kootenai Tribes $ 642,000   2017-10-012021-09-30
Oglala Sioux Tribe Of Pine Ridge Indian Reservation $ 160,000   2018-10-012020-09-30
Agricultural Resources, Massachusetts Department Of $ 388,500   2018-10-012020-09-30
Plant Board, Arkansas State $ 333,284   2019-10-012020-09-30
Agriculture, Washington State Dept Of $ 575,952   2019-10-012020-09-30



Program Accomplishments

Fiscal Year 2016: The Consolidated Pesticide Enforcement Cooperative Agreements are continuing environmental program grants. It is anticipated that 72 applications for pesticide enforcement grants will be received and 72 grants awarded in fiscal year 2016. Agencies participating in the federal cooperative agreement program receive funds to support and strengthen pesticide compliance monitoring, inspection, and enforcement activities. Typical program activities include inspections and observations at pesticide application sites to ensure user compliance with label directions and acceptable use practices; inspections of pesticide products at production facilities and in the retail marketplace to ensure industry compliance with registration, classification, and labeling requirements; and initiation of appropriate enforcement action when violations are detected including civil and criminal prosecution, stop sale orders, seizures, recalls, and warning notices. The states will also develop implementation plans for special pesticide initiatives. States will be responsible for dissemination of information and materials related to these pesticide initiatives. States, territories, and tribes that are participating in the pesticide enforcement cooperative agreements program are expected to conduct approximately 82,000 compliance monitoring inspections in FY 2016. These inspections will be conducted at agricultural establishments, pesticide producers and retailers, ports of entry, at pesticide applicators, as well as at other site where pesticides were distributed, sold, or used. Fiscal Year 2017: The Consolidated Pesticide Enforcement Cooperative Agreements are continuing environmental program grants. It is anticipated that 70 applications for pesticide enforcement grants will be received and 70 grants awarded in fiscal year 2017. Agencies participating in the federal cooperative agreement program receive funds to support and strengthen pesticide compliance monitoring, inspection, and enforcement activities. Typical program activities include inspections and observations at pesticide application sites to ensure user compliance with label directions and acceptable use practices; inspections of pesticide products at production facilities and in the retail marketplace to ensure industry compliance with registration, classification, and labeling requirements; and initiation of appropriate enforcement action when violations are detected including civil and criminal prosecution, stop sale orders, seizures, recalls, and warning notices. The states will also develop implementation plans for special pesticide initiatives. States will be responsible for dissemination of information and materials related to these pesticide initiatives. States, territories, and tribes that are participating in the pesticide enforcement cooperative agreements program are expected to conduct approximately 78,000 compliance monitoring inspections in FY 2017. These inspections will be conducted at agricultural establishments, pesticide producers and retailers, ports of entry, at pesticide applicators, as well as at other site where pesticides were distributed, sold, or used. These grants fund state and tribal pesticide programs that are part of a consolidated agreement. As EPA?s co-regulators, these pesticide programs work extensively with pesticide applicators, growers, commodity groups, as well as other government agencies to promote the proper use of pesticides and address pesticide issues. These programs conduct extensive technical assistance for all stakeholders as well as the general public, and provide outreach and education on EPA?s national pesticide priorities such as worker protection, pollinator protection and emerging public health pesticide issues. If enforcement funds are included, these funds are used to enforce FIFRA. - https://www.cfda.gov/index?s=program&mode=form&tab=step1&id=ab5da0b9a33c2522fae9f6c160d7670c. Fiscal Year 2018: No Current Data Available

Uses and Use Restrictions

Available for costs specifically incurred in purchasing inspectional supplies and equipment; reimbursing State travel and per diem expenses associated with the performance of grant outputs; purchasing essential laboratory equipment and supplies; paying salaries for personnel performing inspectional, analytical and/or managerial functions related to grant activities, and for administrative costs associated with the performance of grant outputs.

Funds also can be used for training.

Each program must have at least one federally credentialed inspector pursuant to the September 2004 Guidance for Issuing Federal EPA Inspector Credentials to Authorize Employees of State/Tribal Governments to Conduct Inspections on Behalf of EPA.

Assistance agreement awards under this program may involve or relate to geospatial information.

Further information regarding geospatial information may be obtained by viewing the following website: https://www.epa.gov/geospatial.

There are no specific restrictions on the use of this assistance. Grant recipients and sub-recipients are encouraged to adopt and enforce policies that ban text messaging while driving company-owned or -rented vehicles or government-owned vehicles, or while driving privately-owned vehicles when on official government business or when performing any work for or on behalf of the government.

Grant recipients and sub-recipients are encouraged to conduct initiatives of the type described in section 3(a) of the Federal Leadership on Reducing Text Messaging While Driving Executive Order that was signed on October 1, 2009.

Eligibility Requirements

Applicant Eligibility

State agencies having pesticide compliance program responsibilities in each state, territory and possession of the United States, including the District of Columbia and Indian Tribes.

Beneficiary Eligibility

States, Federally Recognized Indian Tribal Governments, U.S. Territories and the District of Columbia.

Credentials/Documentation

The application must supply evidence of legal authority to conduct pesticide compliance activities contemplated under the grant and a workable program officially adopted for the agency. Costs will be determined in accordance with the provisions of 2 CFR 200 Subpart E. 2 CFR 200, Subpart E - Cost Principles applies to this program.

Aplication and Award Process

Preapplication Coordination

Discussions or informal meetings with Regional program offices concerning program preparation are advisable.

The standard application forms as furnished by the Federal agency and required by 2 CFR 200 and 1500 must be used for this program.

This program is excluded from coverage under E.O.

12372.

Environmental impact information is not required for this program.

This program is excluded from coverage under E.O.

12372.

Application Procedures

2 CFR 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards applies to this program. Requests for application form and completed applications should be submitted to the appropriate EPA Regional Office (see Appendix IV of the Catalog). The enforcement program is excluded from coverage under 2 CFR 200 and 1500. Applicants, except in limited circumstances approved by the Agency, must submit all initial applications for funding through http://www.grants.gov.

Award Procedures

Each application shall be subjected to administrative coordination to determine adequacy in relation to grant regulations, and to technical and program evaluation to determine merit and relevancy of the project. States will be notified of Federal Assistance Awards through the Federal Assistance Awards Data System (FAADS). Applicants may use http://www.grants.gov to electronically apply for certain grant opportunities under this CFDA.

Deadlines

Contact the headquarters or regional office, as appropriate, for application deadlines.

Authorization

Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act, Section 23, Public Law 92-516, 7 U.S.C 136; Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act, Section 23, Public Law 94-140, 7 Stat. 136; Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act, Section 23, Public Law 95-396, 7 U.S.C 136.

Range of Approval/Disapproval Time

About 60 days.

Appeals

Disputes will be resolved under 2 CFR 1500 Subpart E, as applicable.

Renewals

Applicants must reapply.

Assistance Considerations

Formula and Matching Requirements

This program has no statutory formula. This program has no matching requirements. This program does not have MOE requirements.

Length and Time Phasing of Assistance

Projects are normally funded for a 12-month period. Payments will be on an advance letter of credit or reimbursement basis; recipient must request the initial advance payment on SF 270, Request for Advance or Reimbursement. See the following for information on how assistance is awarded/released: Other.

Post Assistance Requirements

Reports

As requested in the Annual Program Guidance for inclusion in the grant award; quarterly with mid-year and year-end evaluations.

Program reports are required.

No cash reports are required.

Progress reports are required.

Expenditure reports are required.

Performance monitoring is required under this program.

Audits

In accordance with the provisions of 2 CFR 200, Subpart F - Audit Requirements, non-Federal entities that expend financial assistance of $750,000 or more in Federal awards will have a single or a program-specific audit conducted for that year. Non-Federal entities that expend less than $750,000 a year in Federal awards are exempt from Federal audit requirements for that year, except as noted in 2 CFR 200.503. Grants and cooperative agreements are subject to inspections and audits by the Comptroller General of the United States, the EPA Office of Inspector General, other EPA staff, or any authorized representative of the Federal government. Reviews by the EPA Project Officer and the Grants Specialist may occur each year.

Records

Financial records including all documents to support entries on accounting records and to substantiate charges to each cooperative agreement must be kept available to personnel authorized to examine EPA grant accounts. All records must be maintained for three years from the date of the submission of the annual financial status report or longer if questions still remain, such as those raised as a result of audit.

Financial Information

Account Identification

68-0103-0-1-304.

Obigations

(Cooperative Agreements) FY 16 $17,886,000; FY 17 est $17,737,000; and FY 18 est $11,050,000 - FY 16 - 17,886,000; FY 17 - 17,737,000; FY 18 - 11,050,000.

Range and Average of Financial Assistance

32,000 (territory) to 698,000; average 245,000.

Regulations, Guidelines, and Literature

Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards' 2 CFR 200; Environmental Protection Agency, State and Local Assistance (40 CFR Part 35 Subpart A).

Information Contacts

Regional or Local Office

See Regional Agency Offices. Contact appropriate EPA Regional Office listed in Appendix IV of the Catalog.

Headquarters Office

Elizabeth Vizard Office Of Compliance, Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance (2227A), EPA, Washington, District of Columbia 20460 Email: vizard.elizabeth@epa.gov Phone: (202) 564-5940

Criteria for Selecting Proposals

Each application will be reviewed by the Environmental Protection Agency according to the following criteria: (1) Need: The need for the development, improvement and/or maintenance of a comprehensive pesticides enforcement program within the State/Tribe that includes enforcement, new initiative programs, and programs that address existing environmental problems, potential problems, and/or existing exposed populations related to the use of pesticides; (2) State/Tribal Pesticide Activity: The relative amount of pesticide production, formulation and use in a State/Tribe, and the potential risk to human health and the environment from pesticide misuse or abuse; (3) Long-Term Impact: The potential of the cooperative agreement to have a long-term beneficial impact on human health and the environment resulting from the comprehensive pesticide program; (4) Effectiveness of program: The past level and effectiveness of the State/Tribal pesticide program; (5) Level of activity; As indicated by such factors as numbers of farms and numbers of applicators; (6) Magnitude of effort: Need to accomplish expected outputs and products; and (7) Ability to accomplish output goals.



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