Aging Research

To encourage biomedical, social, and behavioral research and research training directed toward greater understanding of the aging process and the diseases, special problems, and needs of people as they age.

The National Institute on Aging has established programs to pursue these goals.


credit: Fresh Healthy Vending
The Division of Aging Biology emphasizes understanding the basic biological processes of aging.

The Division of Geriatrics and Clinical Gerontology supports research to improve the abilities of health care practitioners to respond to the diseases and other clinical problems of older people.

The Division of Behavioral and Social Research supports research that will lead to greater understanding of the social, cultural, economic and psychological factors that affect both the process of growing old and the place of older people in society.

The Division of Neuroscience fosters research concerned with the age-related changes in the nervous system as well as the related sensory, perceptual, and cognitive processes associated with aging and has a special emphasis on Alzheimer's disease.

Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program: To expand and improve the SBIR program; to increase private sector commercialization of innovations derived from Federal research and development; to increase small business participation in Federal research and development; and to foster and encourage participation of socially and economically disadvantaged small business concerns and women-owned small business concerns in technological innovation.

Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) program: To stimulate and foster scientific and technological innovation through cooperative research development carried out between small business concerns and research institutions; to foster technology transfer between small business concerns and research institutions; to increase private sector commercialization of innovations derived from Federal research and development; and to foster and encourage participation of socially and economically disadvantaged small business concerns and women-owned small business concerns in technological innovation.
Examples of Funded Projects

Fiscal Year 2016: No Current Data Available Fiscal Year 2017: Examples may be selected by accessing the NIH Reporter site: http://projectreporter.nih.gov/reporter.cfm and choosing NIA as the Agency/Institute/Center.

Fiscal Year 2018: Examples may be selected by accessing the NIH Reporter site: http://projectreporter.nih.gov/reporter.cfm and choosing NIA as the Agency/Institute/Center.


Agency - Department of Health and Human Services

The Department of Health and Human Services is the Federal government's principal agency for protecting the health of all Americans and providing essential human services, especially to those who are least able to help themselves.





Selected Recipients for this Program


RecipientAmount Start DateEnd Date
University Of Florida $ 302,193   2018-09-012023-08-31
University Of Arizona $ 146,898   2018-09-012023-08-31
Regents Of The University Of Colorado, The $ 12,000   2013-09-012023-08-31
Johns Hopkins University, The $ 13,590,848   2003-06-012023-06-30
Regents Of The University Of Michigan $ 7,370,728   2007-09-302023-06-30
University Of Tennessee $ 1,321,962   2015-08-152023-06-30
Yale University $ 15,522,511   2002-09-302023-06-30
Regents Of The University Of California, San Francisco, The $ 7,809,797   1997-09-302023-06-30
National Bureau Of Economic Research, Inc. $ 17,637,807   1998-03-062023-06-30
Trustees Of The University Of Pennsylvania, The $ 19,634,022   2008-03-152023-06-30



Program Accomplishments

Not Applicable.

Uses and Use Restrictions

Research grants are intended to support the direct costs of a project in accordance with an approved budget, plus an appropriate amount for facilities and administrative costs.

Grantees must agree to administer the grant in accordance with the regulations and policies governing the research grants program of the Public Health Service.

National Research Service Awards (NRSA) (Individual) are made directly to approved applicants for research training in specified biomedical shortage areas.

In addition, National Research Service Awards (Institutional) may be made to institutions to enable them to make NRSAs to individuals selected by them.

Each individual who receives a postdoctoral NRSA is obligated, upon termination of the award, to comply with certain service and payback provisions.

Regulations are published in the Code of Federal Regulations and 42 CFR, Part 66.

SBIR Phase I grants (of approximately 6 months' duration) are to establish the technical merit and feasibility of a proposed research effort that may lead to a commercial product or process.

SBIR Phase II grants are for the continuation of the research initiated in Phase I and that are likely to result in commercial products or processes.

Only Phase I awardees are eligible to apply for Phase II support.

STTR Phase I grants (normally of 1- year duration) are to determine the scientific, technical, and commercial merit and feasibility of the proposed cooperative effort that has potential for commercial application.

Phase II funding is based on results of research initiated in Phase I and scientific and technical merit and commercial potential on Phase II application.

Eligibility Requirements

Applicant Eligibility

Grants: Universities, colleges, medical, dental and nursing schools, schools of public health, laboratories, hospitals, State and local health departments, other public or private institutions (both for-profit and nonprofit), and individuals.

National Research Service Award: Individual NRSAs may be made for postdoctoral training to applicants who hold a professional or scientific degree (M.D., Ph.D., D.D.S., D.O., D.V.M., Sc.D., D.Eng., or equivalent domestic or foreign degree) or for predoctoral training to applicants registered for doctoral research training.

Institutional NRSAs may be made for both predoctoral and postdoctoral research training.

Predoctoral awardees must have a baccalaureate degree.

Applicants must be citizens of the United States or admitted for permanent residency.

Individual NRSA awardees must be nominated and sponsored by a public or private nonprofit institution having staff and facilities suitable to the proposed research training.

Nonprofit domestic organizations may apply for the Institutional NRSA.

SBIR grants can be awarded only to domestic small businesses (entities that are independently owned and operated for profit, are not dominant in the field in which research is proposed, and have no more than 500 employees).

Primary employment (more than one-half time) of the principal investigator must be with the small business at the time of award and during the conduct of the proposed project.

In both Phase I and Phase II, the research must be performed in the U.S.

or its possessions.

STTR grants can be awarded only to domestic small business concerns (entities that are independently owned and operated for profit, are not dominant in the field in which research is proposed and have no more than 500 employees) which 'partner' with a research institution in cooperative research and development.

At least 40 percent of the project is to be performed by the small business concern and at least 30 percent by the research institution.

In both Phase I and Phase II, the research must be performed in the U.S.

and its possessions.

To be eligible for funding, a grant application other than a fellowship must be assessed for scientific merit by a scientific review group and receive approval from a national advisory council.

Individual funding opportunity announcements published in the NIH Guide provide more detail on eligibility.

Beneficiary Eligibility

Any nonprofit or for-profit organization, company, or institution engaged in biomedical research. Students pursuing doctoral research training.

Credentials/Documentation

The grants application process at NIA and NIH has now completed the transition to electronic submission. Details on registration can be found at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/ElectronicReceipt/index.htm. 2 CFR 200, Subpart E - Cost Principles applies to this program.

Aplication and Award Process

Preapplication Coordination

Preapplication coordination is not applicable.

Environmental impact information is not required for this program.

This program is excluded from coverage under E.O.

12372.

Application Procedures

This program is excluded from coverage under 2 CFR 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards. Consultation from institute staff is available for all grant programs. Applicants are encouraged to visit the Internet Web sites of the 27 institutes and centers at the NIH to obtain contact information for program staff. Applicants for multi-project awards are strongly encouraged to consult program staff before applying. Applicants may obtain forms and instructions for application preparation and submission at the following Internet Web site: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/forms.htm When completed these applications should be submitted electronically. See: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/ElectronicReceipt/index.htm. Applications are reviewed for scientific merit, evaluation of applicant qualifications, adequacy of the research environment, and significance of the proposed problem to be studied. The application form and instructions for the preparation and submission of applications to the National Research Service Awards Research Training Grants and Fellowships (NRSA) Program, PHS Form 416-1, can be obtained from the following URL (http://grants.nih.gov/grants/funding/416/phs416.htm). Prior to making formal application to the NRSA programs, individual NRSA applicants must be nominated and sponsored by a Federal, public or nonprofit institution having staff and facilities appropriate to the proposed research training program. Information concerning current areas of science being supported by those institutes participating in the NRSA Program at the NIH is available on the individual institute Web sites. A complete list of institutes at NIH is available at: http://www.nih.gov/icd. In addition, information about each institute's NRSA research topics and information about the NRSA Program can be obtained from the Division of Extramural Outreach and Information Resources, (see address above). The NRSA program is subject to the provisions of 45 CFR Part 92 for State and local governments and OMB Circular No. A-110 for nonprofit organizations. The annual NIH Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR)-Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Omnibus Solicitation and SBIR-STTR Contract Solicitation may be obtained electronically by accessing the following URL: http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm. The solicitations include application preparation and submission guidelines and instructions, information about review considerations, and Internet hyperlinks to the SBIR-STTR application and/or or contract proposal forms. Applications to NIH's SBIR-STTR Programs must be submitted electronically through the U.S. Federal Government's Internet Web site, Grants.gov: www.grants.gov. Submission of SBIR-STTR applications through Grants.gov requires pre-registration, which typically takes 2-4 weeks to complete. Information about registration to submit applications through Grants.gov can be found at: http://era.nih.gov/ElectronicReceipt/preparing.htm. Applicants are encouraged to read and refer to the extensive information on electronic submission of grant applications on the NIH Electronic Submission of Grants Applications Internet Web site at: http://era.nih.gov/ElectronicReceipt.

Award Procedures

Grants and Institutional NRSAs: Each application receives an initial scientific review by non-NIH scientists and a secondary review by the National Advisory Council on Aging. Individual NRSAs do not receive a secondary review by the National Advisory Council on Aging. Awards are issued by the NIA to the grantee institution. All accepted SBIR/STTR applications are evaluated for scientific and technical merit by an appropriate scientific peer review panel and by a national advisory council or board. All applications receiving a priority score compete for available SBIR/STTR set-aside funds on the basis of scientific and technical merit and commercial potential of the proposed research, program relevance, and program balance among the areas of research.

Deadlines

Contact the headquarters or regional office, as appropriate, for application deadlines.

Authorization

Small Business Research and Development Enhancement Act of 1992, Public Law 102-564; Public Health Service Act, Title IV, Part C, Section 444,445,445 A-F, Public Law 99-158, 42 U.S.C 285; Public Health Service Act, Title III, Part A, Section 301, Public Law 78-410, 42 U.S.C 241; Public Health Service Act, Title IV, Part F, Section 487, Public Law 100-607, 42 U.S.C 288; National Institutes Reform Act of 2006, Title IV, Part F, Section 487, Public Law 109-482, 120 Stat. 3675.

Range of Approval/Disapproval Time

Grants: From 6 to 9 months. National Research Service Awards: From 6 to 9 months. SBIR/STTR: About 7-1/2 months.

Appeals

From 30 to 60 days. A principal investigator may question the substantive or procedural aspects of the review of his/her application by communicating with the staff of the Institute. A formal appeal requires the signature of the appropriate institutional official.

Renewals

> 180 Days. Grants: Renewal applications are accepted for most programs. Most individual NIH postdoctoral fellowship support is for no more than 3 years. Most individual predoctoral support is for no more than five years. Exploratory/developmental grant awards and Small Grant awards may not be renewed.

Assistance Considerations

Formula and Matching Requirements

This program has no statutory formula. This program has no matching requirements. None. This program does not have MOE requirements. None.

Length and Time Phasing of Assistance

Grant Awards are usually made annually and usually with project periods not to exceed 5 years in length. National Research Service Awards: Institutional awards may be made for up to 5 years, and individual awards may be made for as many as 3 years. SBIR: Normally, Phase I awards are for 6 months; normally, Phase II awards are for 2 years. STTR: Normally, Phase I awards are for 1 year; normally, Phase II awards are for 2 years. Method of awarding/releasing assistance: lump sum.

Post Assistance Requirements

Reports

No program reports are required.

No cash reports are required.

Grants: Annual progress reports and reports of expenditures are required.

National Research Service Awards: Institutional awards require that a statement of appointment for each trainee selected by the Program Director be submitted to the NIA for each year of training.

Reports are required after termination of the awards to ascertain compliance with the service and payback provisions for each institutionally selected trainee.

Individual awards require reports upon award expiration to determine compliance with the service and payback provisions.

Grants: Annual progress reports and reports of expenditures are required.

National Research Service Awards: Institutional awards require that a statement of appointment for each trainee selected by the Program Director be submitted to the NIA for each year of training.

Reports are required after termination of the awards to ascertain compliance with the service and payback provisions for each institutionally selected trainee.

Individual awards require reports upon award expiration to determine compliance with the service and payback provisions.

No performance monitoring is required.

Audits

In accordance with the provisions of 2 CFR 200, Subpart F - Audit Requirements, non-Federal entities that expend financial assistance of $750,000 or more in Federal awards will have a single or a program-specific audit conducted for that year. Non-Federal entities that expend less than $750,000 a year in Federal awards are exempt from Federal audit requirements for that year, except as noted in 2 CFR 200.503. Records must be available for review or audit by appropriate officials of the Federal agency, pass-through entity, and Government Accountability Office (GAO). In accordance with 45 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 74.26, for-profit (commercial) organizations are subject to audit requirements for a non-Federal audit if, during its fiscal year, it expended $500,000 or more under HHS awards and at least one award is a HHS grant or subgrant. The regulation incorporates the thresholds and deadlines of OMB Circular No. A-133, but provides for profit organizations with two options for the type of audit that will satisfy the audit requirement: 1. a financial related audit of the HHS awards in accordance with Government Auditing Standards, or 2. an audit that meets the requirements of OMB Circular No. A-133. In accordance with NIH grants policy, Foreign grantees are subject to the same audit requirements as for-profit (commercial) organizations.

Records

Grantees generally must retain financial and programmatic records, supporting documents, statistical records, and all other records that are required by the terms of a grant, or may reasonably be considered pertinent to a grant, for a period of 3 years from the date the annual FSR is submitted. For awards under SNAP (other than those to foreign organizations and Federal institutions), the 3-year retention period will be calculated from the date the FSR for the entire competitive segment is submitted. Those grantees must retain the records pertinent to the entire competitive segment for 3 years from the date the FSR is submitted to NIH. Foreign organizations and Federal institutions must retain records for 3 years from the date of submission of the annual FSR to NIH. See 45 CFR 74.53 and 92.42 for exceptions and qualifications to the 3-year retention requirement (e.g., if any litigation, claim, financial management review, or audit is started before the expiration of the 3-year period, the records must be retained until all litigation, claims, or audit findings involving the records have been resolved and final action taken). Those sections also specify the retention period for other types of grant-related records, including F&A cost proposals and property records. See 45 CFR 74.48 and 92.36 for record retention and access requirements for contracts under grants. In accordance with 45 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 74.53(e), the HHS Inspector General, the U.S. Comptroller General, or any of their duly authorized representatives have the right of timely and unrestricted access to any books, documents, papers, or other records of recipients that are pertinent to awards in order to make audits, examinations, excerpts, transcripts, and copies of such documents. This right also includes timely and reasonable access to a recipient?s personnel records for the purpose of interview and discussion related to such documents. The rights of access are not limited to the required retention period, but shall last as long as records are retained.

Financial Information

Account Identification

75-0843-0-1-552.

Obigations

(Project Grants) FY 16 $1,596,005,000; FY 17 est $1,995,000,000; and FY 18 est $1,303,541,000 - Amounts shown are actual/estimated amounts available for research grants including SBIR/STTR, centers, research career awards, research project grants, and cooperative agreements. Amounts for research training are not included. (Project Grants (Capacity Building and Complaint Processing, Training)) FY 16 $27,838,000; FY 17 est $32,000,000; and FY 18 est $25,000,000 - Amounts shown are for individual and institutional research training awards.

Range and Average of Financial Assistance

Awards vary in range depending on the particular activity codes. Individual fellowships range from $23,376 to $57,504 and average about $46,000. Research grants have much larger ranges - from $75,000 to several million dollars. Average costs of research grants are around $400,000. All costs are shown on a single year basis. Awards may be for up to five years.

Regulations, Guidelines, and Literature

Not Applicable.

Information Contacts

Regional or Local Office

None.

Headquarters Office

Robin A. Barr, Division of Extramural Activities, National Institute on Aging, 7201 Wisconsin Avenue, Room 2C218, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 Email: rb42h@nih.gov Phone: (301) 402-7715 Fax: (301) 402-2945.

Criteria for Selecting Proposals

The major elements in evaluating proposals include assessments of: the scientific merit and general significance of the proposed study and its objectives; the technical adequacy of the experimental design and approach; the competency of the proposed investigator or group to successfully pursue the project; the adequacy of the available and proposed facilities and resources; the necessity of the budget components requested in relation to the proposed project; and the relevance and importance to announced program objectives. The following criteria will be used in considering the scientific and technical merit of SBIR/STTR Phase I grant applications: (1) The soundness and technical merit of the proposed approach; (2) the qualifications of the proposed principal investigator, supporting staff, and consultants; (3) the technological innovation of the proposed research; (4) the potential of the proposed research for commercial application; (5) the appropriateness of the budget requested; (6) the adequacy and suitability of the facilities and research; and (7) where applicable, the adequacy of assurances detailing the proposed means for (a) safeguarding human or animal subjects, and/or (b) protecting against or minimizing any adverse effect on the environment. Phase II grant applications will be reviewed based upon the following criteria: (1) The degree to which the Phase I objectives were met and feasibility demonstrated; (2) the scientific and technical merit of the proposed approach for achieving the Phase II objectives; (3) the qualifications of the proposed principal investigator, supporting staff, and consultants; (4) the technological innovation, originality, or societal importance of the proposed research; (5) the potential of the proposed research for commercial application; (6) the reasonableness of the budget requested for the work proposed; (7) the adequacy and suitability of the facilities and research environment; and (8) where applicable, the adequacy of assurances detailing the proposed means for (a) safeguarding human or animal subjects, and/or (b) protecting against or minimizing any adverse effect on the environment.



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