Homeland Security Grant Program

The purpose of the Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 HSGP is to support state, local and tribal efforts to prevent terrorism and other catastrophic events and to prepare the Nation for the threats and hazards that pose the greatest risk to the security of the United States.

References to these priorities

credit: Wikimedia Commons
can be found throughout this document.

The FY 2017 HSGP provides funding to implement investments that enhance terrorism preparedness and serve to build, sustain, and deliver the 32 core capabilities essential to achieving the National Preparedness Goal (the Goal) of a secure and resilient Nation.

The building, sustainment, and delivery of these core capabilities are not exclusive to any single level of government, organization, or community, but rather, require the combined effort of the whole community, inclusive of children, individuals with disabilities and others with access and functional needs, diverse communities, and people with limited English proficiency.

The FY 2017 HSGP supports the core capabilities across the five mission areas of Prevention, Protection, Mitigation, Response, and Recovery based on allowable costs.

The FY 2017 HSGP will provide federal funds to assist state, local, tribal, and territorial agencies to obtain the resources required to support implementation of the National Preparedness System (NPS) and the Goal of a secure and resilient Nation.


Among the five basic homeland security missions noted in the DHS Quadrennial Homeland Security Review, HSGP supports the goal to Strengthen National Preparedness and Resilience.



HSGP is comprised of three grant programs:
? State Homeland Security Program (SHSP)
? Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI)
? Operation Stonegarden (OPSG)

Together, these grant programs fund a range of activities, including planning, organization, equipment purchase, training, exercises, and management and administration across all core capabilities and mission areas.



Objectives
? State Homeland Security Program (SHSP): The SHSP assists state, tribal, territorial, and local preparedness activities that address high-priority preparedness gaps across all core capabilities that support terrorism preparedness.

All supported investments are based on capability targets and gaps identified during the Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment (THIRA) process, and assessed in the State Preparedness Report (SPR).


? Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI): The UASI program assists high-threat, high-density Urban Areas in efforts to build, sustain, and deliver the capabilities necessary to prevent, protect against, mitigate, respond to, and recover from acts of terrorism.



? Operation Stonegarden (OPSG): The OPSG Program supports enhanced cooperation and coordination among Customs and Border Protection (CBP), United States Border Patrol (USBP), and Federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial law enforcement agencies.

The OPSG Program provides funding to support joint efforts to secure the United States? borders along routes of ingress from international borders to include travel corridors in states bordering Mexico and Canada, as well as states and territories with international water borders.



All three programs are risk-driven, capabilities-based and outline high-priority needs relating to terrorism preparedness.

For these programs to be effective, government officials and elected leaders, working with the whole community, must consider how to sustain current capability levels, while also addressing potential gaps.



Priorities
The Goal defines what it means for the whole community to be prepared for all types of disasters and emergencies.

The NPS is the instrument the Nation employs to build, sustain, and deliver core capabilities in order to achieve the Goal of a secure and resilient Nation.

Complex and far-reaching threats and hazards require a collaborative and whole community approach to national preparedness that engages individuals, families, communities, private and nonprofit sectors, faith-based organizations, and all levels of government.

The guidance, programs, processes, and systems that support each component of the NPS allows for the integration of preparedness efforts that build, sustain, and deliver core capabilities and achieve the desired outcomes identified in the Goal.



DHS/FEMA publishes the annual National Preparedness Report (NPR) to communicate progress in building, sustaining, and delivering the core capabilities outlined in the Goal.

This analysis provides a National perspective on critical preparedness trends for whole community partners to use to inform program priorities, allocate resources, and communicate with stakeholders about issues of shared concern.

The NPR can be found at http://www.fema.gov/national-preparedness-report.



In developing applications for the FY 2017 HSGP, recipients should consider funding projects that address core capability gaps within the NPR national areas for improvement that relate to terrorism preparedness, including:
? Cybersecurity;
? Infrastructure Systems;
? Economic Recovery;
? Housing; and
? Natural and Cultural Resources.



In addition, DHS/FEMA requires recipients to prioritize investments that address capability targets and gaps identified through the annual THIRA and SPR process.

These assessments set capability targets and measure current ability to meet those targets.



Minimum funding amounts are not prescribed by the DHS for these capability targets and gaps; however, recipients must support state, local, tribal, regional, and national efforts in achieving the desired outcomes of these priorities.

Grant funds must clearly support resources the recipients need to achieve the THIRA targets and close capability gaps.

Appendix B-Program Priorities addresses additional areas where funding can be applied to strengthen preparedness efforts.

Agency - Department of Homeland Security

The Department of Homeland Security has three primary missions: Prevent terrorist attacks within the United States, reduce America's vulnerability to terrorism and minimize the damage from potential attacks and natural disasters.

Office - See Regional Agency Offices.

Additional information (Please include additional information, if applicable) FEMA Regions may also provide fiscal support, including pre- and post-award administration and technical assistance, to the grant programs included in this solicitation.

Relevant Nonprofit Program Categories





Selected Recipients for this Program


RecipientAmount Start DateEnd Date
Homeland Security And Emergency Management, New Mexico Dept Of $ 7,151,247   2018-09-012021-08-31
State Law Enforcement Division $ 3,980,000   2018-09-012021-08-31
Salt River Pima-maricopa Indian Community Educational Se, The $ 350,000   2018-09-012021-08-31
West Virginia, State Of $ 3,980,000   2018-09-012021-08-31
Office Of Emergency Services $ 193,335,000   2018-09-012021-08-31
Kalispel Indian Community Of The Kalispel Reservation $ 59,455   2018-09-012021-08-31
Iowa Homeland Security And Emergency Management Department $ 3,980,000   2018-09-012021-08-31
Emergency Management Agency, Tennessee $ 3,980,000   2018-09-012021-08-31
Military Department, Washington State $ 13,788,000   2018-09-012021-08-31
Emergency Management, Arkansas Department Of $ 3,980,000   2018-09-012021-08-31



Program Accomplishments

Fiscal Year 2016: In Fiscal year 2016, DHS provides $1,037,000,000 to enhance the ability of states and territories to prevent, protect against, respond to, and recover from potential terrorist acts and other hazards. Fiscal Year 2017: It is expected that funds will be awarded to enhance the ability of states and territories to prevent, protect against, respond to and recover from potential terrorist acts and other hazards. Fiscal Year 2018: It is expected that funds will be appropriated and allocated to this program.

Uses and Use Restrictions

DHS grant funds may only be used for the purpose set forth in the grant, and must be consistent with the statutory authority for the award.

Grant funds may not be used for matching funds for other Federal grants/cooperative agreements, lobbying, or intervention in Federal regulatory or adjudicatory proceedings.

In addition, Federal funds may not be used to sue the Federal government or any other government entity.

Pre-award costs are allowable only with the written consent of DHS and if they are included in the award agreement.

Although no longer funded as discrete grant programs, all activities and costs allowed under the FY 2010 Buffer Zone Protection Program (BZPP), FY 2010 Interoperable Emergency Communications Grant Program (IECGP), FY 2011 Citizen Corps Program (CCP), FY 2011 Driver?s License Security Grant Program (DLSGP), and FY 2011 Metropolitan Medical Response System (MMRS) grant program are allowable and encouraged activities and costs under the FY 2017 HSGP.

For additional information on allowable activities, please refer to http://www.fema.gov/grants.

Federal employees are prohibited from serving in any capacity (paid or unpaid) on any proposal submitted under this program.

Federal employees may not receive funds under this award.

There may be limitations on the use of HSGP and THSGP funds for the following categories of costs: ? Management and Administration ? Planning ? Organization ? Equipment ? Training ? Exercises ? Maintenance and Sustainment ? Critical Emergency Supplies ? Construction and Renovation For additional details on restrictions on the use of funds, please refer to the FY 2017 HSGP and THSGP Notice of Funding Opportunity THSGP grantees may only fund investments that were included in the FY 2017 Investment Justifications (IJs) that were submitted to FEMA and evaluated through the peer review process.

Funds Transfer Restriction: The recipient is prohibited from transferring funds between programs (includes SHSP, UASI, and OPSG).

Recipients are allowed to submit an investment/project where funds come from multiple funding sources (i.e., SHSP/UASI); however, recipients are not allowed to divert funding from one program to another due to the risk-based funding allocations, which were made at the discretion of DHS/FEMA.

Awards made to the SAA for HSGP carry additional pass-through requirements.

Pass through is defined as an obligation on the part of the SAA to make funds available to local units of government, combinations of local units, tribal governments, or other specific groups or organizations.

The SAA?s pass through requirement must be met within 45 days of the award date.

Four requirements must be met to pass through grant funds: ? There must be some action to establish a firm commitment on the part of the SAA; ? The action must be unconditional on the part of the awarding entity (i.e., no contingencies for availability of SAA funds); ? There must be documentary evidence (i.e., award document, terms and conditions) of the commitment; and ? The award terms must be communicated to the official recipient The SAA must obligate at least 80 percent (80%) of the funds awarded under SHSP and UASI to local or Tribal units of government within 45 days of receipt of the funds.

?Receipt of funds? occurs when the recipient accepts the award or 15 days after the recipient is notified of the award, whichever comes first.

The signatory authority of the SAA must certify in writing to DHS/FEMA that pass-through requirements have been met.

A letter of intent (or equivalent) to distribute funds is not considered sufficient.

The pass through requirement does not apply to SHSP awards made to the District of Columbia, Guam, American Samoa, the U. S. Virgin Islands, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.

The Commonwealth of Puerto Rico is required to comply with the pass-through requirement and its SAA must also obligate at least 80 percent (80%) of the funds to local units of government within 45 days of receipt of the funds.

Any UASI funds retained by the SAA must be used to directly support the designated Urban Areas in the state.

The SAA must propose an investment describing how such UASI funds it retains will be used to directly support the Urban Area.

Under SHSP, the SAA may retain more than 20 percent (20%) of SHSP funding for expenditure made by the state on behalf of the local unit(s) of government.

This may occur only with the written consent of the local unit of government, specifying the amount of funds to be retained and the intended use of funds.

If a written consent agreement is already in place from previous fiscal years, DHS/FEMA will continue to recognize it for FY 2017.

If modifications to the existing agreement are necessary, the SAA should contact their assigned Headquarters Program Analyst. Per section 2006 of the Homeland Security Act of 2002, as amended, (6 U.S.C.

§ 607), DHS/FEMA is required to ensure that at least 25 percent (25%) of grant funding appropriated for the Homeland Security Grant Program and Tribal Homeland Security Grant Program are used for law enforcement terrorism prevention activities.

DHS/FEMA meets this requirement, in part, by requiring all SHSP and UASI recipients to ensure that at least 25 percent (25%) of the combined HSGP funds allocated under SHSP and UASI are dedicated towards law enforcement terrorism prevention activities, as defined in 6 U.S.C.

§ 607.

The LETPA allocation can be from SHSP, UASI or both.

This requirement does not include award funds from OPSG.

The 25% LETPA allocation is in addition to the 80% pass through requirement to local units of government and Tribes.

The recipient must pass through 100 percent (100%) of OPSG allocations to eligible jurisdictions.

The recipient is prohibited from obligating or expending funds provided through this award until each unique and specific county-level or equivalent Operational Order/Fragmentary Operations Order budget has been reviewed and approved through an official electronic mail notice issued by DHS/FEMA removing this special programmatic condition.

Eligible sub-recipients under the FY 2017 OPSG Program are local units of government at the county level and Federally-recognized Tribal governments in states bordering Canada, states bordering Mexico, and states and territories with international water borders.

All applicants must have active ongoing USBP operations coordinated through a CBP sector office to be eligible for OPSG funding. As part of the FY 2017 OPSG application process, each eligible local unit of government at the county or Federally-recognized Tribal government level must develop their Operations Order in coordination with state and Federal law enforcement agencies, to include, but not limited to CBP/USBP.

Operations Orders that are developed at the county level should be inclusive of city, county, Tribal, and other local law enforcement agencies that are eligible to participate in OPSG operational activities.

The Operations Order should address this in the Executive Summary.

Operations Order details should include the names of the agencies, points of contact, and individual funding requests.

All applications must be developed in collaboration with the local USBP sector office, the SAA and the local unit of government.

The sector office will then forward the application to the SAA for final review before submission to DHS/FEMA.

Applications will be reviewed by the SAA and USBP Sector Headquarters for completeness and adherence to programmatic guidelines and evaluated for anticipated feasibility, need, and impact of the Operations Orders. DHS/FEMA will verify compliance with all administrative and eligibility criteria identified in the NOFO and required submission of Operations Orders and Inventory of Operations Orders by the established due dates.

DHS/FEMA and USBP will use the results of both the risk analysis and the Federal review by DHS/FEMA to make recommendations for funding to the Secretary of Homeland Security. FY 2017 OPSG funds will be allocated competitively based on risk-based prioritization using the USBP Sector-specific border risk methodology described above.

Final funding allocations are determined by the Secretary, who may consider information and input from various law enforcement offices or subject matter experts within the Department.

Factors considered include, but are not limited to: threat, vulnerability, miles of border, and other border-specific ?law enforcement intelligence,? as well as feasibility of FY 2017 Operation Orders to designated localities within the United States Border States and territories.

Eligibility Requirements

Applicant Eligibility

All 56 States, which includes any state of the United States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, are eligible to apply for SHSP funds.

For those states that are eligible for UASI and OPSG funding, the State Administrative Agency (SAA) is the only entity eligible to submit applications to DHS/FEMA on behalf of UASI and OPSG applicants.

Beneficiary Eligibility

THSGP: Native American Tribal Government (Federally recognized) HSGP: States, territories and local governments THSGP: In order to be eligible to receive THSGP funding, grantees must be considered ?directly eligible Tribes.? Per the 9/11 Act, the term ?directly eligible Tribe? means ? (A) any Indian Tribe ? (i) that is located in the continental United States; (ii) that operates a law enforcement or emergency response agency with the capacity to respond to calls for law enforcement or emergency services; (iii) a. that is located on or near (50 miles) an international border or a coastline bordering an ocean (including the Gulf of Mexico) or international waters (excluding shoreline border around the Great Lakes); b. that is located within 10 miles of a system or asset included on the prioritized critical infrastructure list established under section 210E(a)(2) [please refer to section 1001 of the 9/11 Act] or has such a system or asset within its territory; c. that is located within or contiguous to one of the 50 most populous metropolitan statistical areas in the United States; or d. the jurisdiction of which includes not less than 1,000 square miles of Indian country, as that term is defined in section 1151 of title 18, United States Code; and (iv) that certifies to the Secretary that a State has not provided funds under section 2003 [UASI] or 2004 [SHSP] to the Indian Tribe or consortium of Indian Tribes for the purpose for which direct funding is sought; and (B) a consortium of Indian Tribes, if each Tribe satisfies the requirements of subparagraph (A). In summary, eligible Tribes must meet the requirements set forth in (A) (i), and (A) (ii), and (A) (iv). Tribes must also meet one of the requirements set forth in (A) (iii); either (A) (iii) (a), or (A) (iii) (b), or (A) (iii) (c), or (A) (iii) (d). Finally, (B) may also be satisfied, if each Tribe satisfies the requirements of subparagraph (A). In FY 2012, applicants must self-certify as to whether they meet the eligibility requirements. Self-certification will be provided on the THSGP Eligibility Certification Form as part of Application Investment Justification. Any questions regarding an applicant?s proximity to a Critical Infrastructure and Key Structures (CI/KR) site, as described in the eligibility criteria, may be directed to the State Administrative Agency (SAA). Any additional questions regarding the overall self-certification of eligibility process may be directed to the Centralized Scheduling and Information Desk (CSID). CSID can be reached by phone at (800) 368-6498 or by e-mail at askcsid@dhs.gov, Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m. ? 5:30 p.m. EST.

Credentials/Documentation

As part of the FY 2017 HSGP application process for SHSP and UASI funds, applicants must develop a formal IJ that addresses the proposed investments. Each IJ must demonstrate how proposed investments: ? Address capability gaps identified as State priorities in the most recent SPR; ? Align to Urban Area, state, and/or regional THIRAs and national priorities, as outlined in the NPR; and ? Engage and/or impact the whole community, including children, older adults, pregnant women, individuals with limited English proficiency, individuals with disabilities and others with access and functional needs. Furthermore, the IJ must clearly identify and explain how the project will assist the applicant to achieve capability targets related to preventing, preparing for, protecting against, or responding to acts of terrorism. Instructions for SHSP ? Applicants must propose at least one and include up to 10 projects within each investment in their IJ to describe the activities they would plan to implement with SHSP funds. ? Any projects not included in the application must be included in the first BSIR. ? Of the proposed 10 investments, recipients using SHSP funds are required to propose at least one investment in support of a designated fusion center that will be funded by SHSP funds. Recipients must coordinate with the fusion center when developing a fusion center investment prior to submission. ? Recipients investing in emergency communications must describe how activities align to their statewide Communication Interoperable Plan (SCIP). Recipients must coordinate with their statewide Interoperability Coordinator (SWIC) and/or statewide Interoperability Governance Body (SIGB) when developing an emergency communications investment prior to submission to ensure the project supports the statewide strategy to improve emergency communications and is compatible and interoperable with surrounding systems. Instructions for UASI ? Urban Areas must propose at least one and up to 10 projects within each investment in their IJ to describe the activities they are planning to implement with UASI funds. ? Any projects not included in the application must be included in the first BSIR. ? If applicable, Urban Areas are required to propose at least one investment in support of a designated fusion center within the Urban Area. Recipients must coordinate with the fusion center when developing a fusion center investment prior to submission. ? If UASI funds are used by the SAA in support of the Urban Area, the SAA must, as part of the up to 10 investments, propose an investment describing how UASI funds will be used by the SAA to directly support the Urban Area. ? Recipients investing in emergency communications must describe how activities align to the SCIP. Recipients must coordinate with the statewide Interoperability Coordinator (SWIC) and/or statewide Interoperability Governance Body (SIGB) when developing an emergency communications investment prior to submission to ensure the project supports the statewide strategy to improve emergency communications and is compatible and interoperable with surrounding systems. Instructions for OPSG As part of the FY 2017 OPSG application process, each eligible local unit of government at the county or Federally-recognized Tribal government level must develop their Operations Order in coordination with state and Federal law enforcement agencies, to include, but not limited to CBP/USBP. Operations Orders that are developed at the county level should be inclusive of city, county, Tribal, and other local law enforcement agencies that are eligible to participate in OPSG operational activities. The Operations Order should address this in the Executive Summary. Operations Order details should include the names of the agencies, points of contact, and individual funding requests. All applications must be developed in collaboration with the local USBP sector office, the SAA and the local unit of government. The sector office will then forward the application to the SAA for final review before submission to DHS/FEMA. 2 CFR 200, Subpart E - Cost Principles applies to this program.

Aplication and Award Process

Preapplication Coordination

Preapplication coordination is required.

Environmental impact information is not required for this program.

This program is eligible for coverage under E.O.

12372, 'Intergovernmental Review of Federal Programs.' An applicant should consult the office or official designated as the single point of contact in his or her State for more information on the process the State requires to be followed in applying for assistance, if the State has selected the program for review.

Application Procedures

2 CFR 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards applies to this program. All applications must be received by the established deadline. The Non-Disaster (ND) Grants System has a date stamp that indicates when an application is submitted. Applicants will receive an electronic message confirming receipt of the full application. In general, DHS/FEMA will not review applications that are not received by the deadline or consider them for funding. DHS/FEMA may, however, extend the application deadline on request for any applicant who can demonstrate that good cause exists to justify extending the deadline. Good cause for an extension may include technical problems outside of the applicant?s control that prevent submission of the application by the deadline, or other exigent or emergency circumstances. If you experience technical issues, you must notify the respective Headquarters Program Analyst as soon as possible. Application forms and instructions are available at Grants.gov. To access these materials, go to http://www.grants.gov, select ?Applicants? then ?Apply for Grants,? read the registration requirements and register if necessary (Allow up to 7-10 business days after you submit before your registration is active in SAM, then an additional 24 hours for Grants.gov to recognize your information). In order to obtain the application package select ?Download a Grant Application Package?, enter the CFDA and/or the funding opportunity number located on the cover of this NOFO, select ?Download Package,? and then follow the prompts to download the application package.

Award Procedures

In FY 20177, the total amount of funds distributed under this grant program will be $1,037,000,000. The specific information regarding funding allocations for the three HSGP programs are detailed below: SHSP Allocations: FY 2017 SHSP funds will be allocated based on three factors: minimum amounts as legislatively mandated, DHS/FEMA?s risk methodology, and anticipated effectiveness of proposed projects. Anticipated effectiveness is assessed based on the applicant?s description of how proposed projects, as outlined in the investment Justification?s (IJ?s), align with state THIRA and SPR results. Each state and territory will receive a minimum allocation under SHSP using thresholds established in the Homeland Security Act of 2002, as amended. All 50 States, the District of Columbia, and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico will receive 0.35 percent of the total funds allocated for grants under Section 2003 and Section 2004 of the Homeland Security Act of 2002, as amended. Four territories (American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, and the U.S. Virgin Islands) will receive a minimum allocation of 0.08 percent of the total funds allocated for grants under Section 2003 and 2004 of the Homeland Security Act of 2002, as amended. UASI Allocations: FY 2017 UASI funds will be allocated based on DHS/FEMA?s risk methodology and anticipated effectiveness of proposed projects. Anticipated effectiveness is assessed based on the applicant?s description of how proposed projects, as outlined in the IJ?s, align with the Urban Area THIRA. Eligible candidates for the FY 2017 UASI program have been determined through an analysis of relative risk of terrorism faced by the 100 most populous Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) in the United States, in accordance with the Homeland Security Act of 2002, as amended. Detailed information on MSAs is publicly available from the United States Census Bureau at http://www.census.gov/population/www/metroareas/metrodef.html. OPSG Allocations: The FY 2017 OPSG Risk Assessment is designed to identify the risk to border security and to assist with the distribution of funds for the grant program. Funding under OPSG is distributed based on the risk to the security of the border. Entities eligible for funding are the state, local and Tribal law enforcement agencies that are located along the border of the United States. For the purposes of OPSG, risk is defined as the potential for an adverse outcome assessed as a function of threats, vulnerabilities, and consequences associated with an incident, event, or occurrence. Based upon ongoing intelligence analysis and extensive security reviews, DHS/FEMA continues to focus the bulk of OPSG funds based upon risk analyses. The risk model used to allocate OPSG funds considers the potential risk that certain threats pose to border security and estimate the relative risk faced by a given area. In evaluating risk, DHS/FEMA considers the populations in a particular area that could be at risk, the concentration of people in the area, and specific characteristics of their location that might contribute to risk, such as Intelligence Community assessments of threat and the potential impacts that the threats pose to the security of the border area. For vulnerability and consequence, DHS/FEMA considers the expected impact and consequences of successful border events occurring in specific areas. To determine the level of risk, two primary components are considered: Threat: natural or man-made occurrence, individual, entity, or action that has or indicates the potential to harm life, information, operations, the environment, and/or property. OPSG uses the effect of the threat to the border to evaluate consequence. Vulnerability: characteristic of design, location, security posture, operation, or any combination thereof, that renders an asset, system, network, or entity susceptible to disruption, destruction, or exploitation. Threat and vulnerability are evaluated by assigning each factor a value based on specific operational data from CBP Components. Threat components present in each of the Sectors are used to determine the overall threat score. These components are: Terrorism Criminal Aliens Drug Trafficking Organizations Alien Smuggling Organizations.

Deadlines

Jun 02, 2017 to Jun 22, 2017 Application Start Date: 06/02/2017 Application Submission Deadline Date: 06/22/2017 at 5:00 PM EDT Anticipated Funding Selection Date: 09/01/2017 09/30/2017 Anticipated Award Date: 09/30/2017.

Authorization

Homeland Security Act of 2002 , Public Law 107-296; Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Act of 2017, Public Law 114-4.

Range of Approval/Disapproval Time

Announcement Notice of Funding Opportunity. Anticipated Funding Selection Date is 09/01/2017.FY 2017 SHSP and UASI are non-competitive programs. Funds for FY 2017 OPSG will be allocated competitively. This includes the use of risk-based prioritization using CBP Sector-specific border risk to include, but not limited to: threat, vulnerability, miles of border, and other border-specific law enforcement intelligence. Each applicant?s final funding allocation will be determined by using a combination of the results of the risk analysis and feasibility of the Operations Orders. The following process will be used to make awards under FY 2017 THSGP: ? Applicants will self-certify as to tribal eligibility per the 9/11 Act; ? FEMA will verify compliance with all administrative and eligibility criteria identified in the application kit, to include the required submission of an IJ by the established due dates; ? Eligible applications will be reviewed and scored through a peer review process to analyze the anticipated effectiveness of proposed Investments; and ? FEMA will use the results of the peer review effectiveness scores to make recommendations for funding to the Secretary of Homeland Security.

Appeals

Other - Not Specified.

Renewals

Other - Not Specified.

Assistance Considerations

Formula and Matching Requirements

Statutory Formula: FY 2017 SHSP funds will be allocated based on three factors: minimum amounts as legislatively mandated, DHS? risk methodology, and anticipated effectiveness based on the strength of the Investment Justification (IJ). Each State and territory will receive a minimum allocation under SHSP using the thresholds established in the 9/11 Act. All 50 States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico will receive 0.35 percent of the total funds allocated for grants under Section 2003 and Section 2004 of the Homeland Security Act of 2002, as amended by the 9/11 Act, for SHSP. Four territories (American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, and the U.S. Virgin Islands) will receive a minimum allocation of 0.08 percent of the total funds allocated for grants under Section 2003 and 2004 of the Homeland Security Act of 2002, as amended by the 9/11 Act, for SHSP. This program has no matching requirements. None. This program does not have MOE requirements.

Length and Time Phasing of Assistance

The Period of Performance is 36 months. For more information, refer to the FY 2017 HSGP and THSGP Funding Opportunity Announcement Notice of Funding Opportunity. Awards are subject to the Cash Management Act for payment and/or reimbursement of expenditures. The period of performance outlined above support the effort to expedite the outlay of grant funding and provide economic stimulus. Agencies should request waivers sparingly, and they will be granted only due to compelling legal, policy, or operational challenges. See the following for information on how assistance is awarded/released: Based on project need.

Post Assistance Requirements

Reports

All successful applicants for all DHS grant and cooperative agreements are required to comply with DHS Standard Administrative Terms and Conditions available within Section 6.1.1 of http://www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/assets/cfo-financial-management-policy-manual.pdf.

Federal Financial Report (FFR) ? required quarterly.

Obligations and expenditures must be reported on a quarterly basis through the FFR (SF-425).

A report must be submitted for every quarter of the period of performance, including partial calendar quarters, as well as for periods where no grant activity occurs.

Future awards and fund drawdowns may be withheld if these reports are delinquent.

The final FFR is due 90 days after the end date of the performance period.

FFRs must be filed electronically through PARS.

Grant Close-Out Process.

DHS/FEMA will close out the grant award when it determines that all applicable administrative actions and all required work of the HSGP award have been completed by the recipient.

This section summarizes the actions that the recipient must take to complete the closeout process in accordance with 2 C.F.R.

§ 200.343 at the end of the grant?s period of performance or the issuance of a Grant Amendment Notice issued to close out the grant. Within 90 days after the end of the period of performance, or after an amendment has been issued to close out a grant, whichever comes first, recipients must submit a final FFR and final progress report detailing all accomplishments and a qualitative summary of the impact of those accomplishments throughout the period of performance, as well as the following documentation: 1) Final request for payment, if applicable; 2) SF-425 ?Final Federal Financial Report; 3) SF-PPR ? Final Performance Progress Report; 4) A qualitative narrative summary on the impact of those accomplishments throughout the entire period of performance submitted to the respective Grant Programs Directorate (GPD) HQ Program Analyst in a Word document; 5) SF-428 ? Tangible Personal Property Report ? Inventory of all tangible personal property acquired using funds from this award.

6) Other documents required by program guidance or terms and conditions of the award.

If applicable, an inventory of all construction projects that used funds from this program has to be reported using the Real Property Status Report (Standard Form SF 429) available at http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/omb/grants/approved_forms/sf-429.pdf. Additionally, the recipient must liquidate all obligations incurred under the HSGP award no later than 90 calendar days after the end date of the period of performance or issuance of a Grant Amendment Notice that closes out the award, whichever comes first.

Recipients who do not liquidate their obligations within this time period may have the costs of their unliquidated obligations disallowed.

Recipients are also responsible for promptly returning to DHS/FEMA the balance of any funds that have been drawn down, but remain unliquidated. After these reports have been reviewed and approved by DHS/FEMA, a close-out notice will be completed to close out the grant.

The notice will indicate the period of performance as closed, list any remaining funds the recipient has not drawn down that will be deobligated, and address requirements for record retention, and disposition and reporting requirements for any equipment or real property purchased using THSGP grant funding.

In addition, any HSGP recipient that issues subawards to any subrecipient is responsible for closing out those subawards as described in 2 C.F.R.

§ 200.343.

HSGP recipients must ensure that they complete the closeout of their subawards in time to submit all necessary documentation and information to DHS/FEMA during the closeout of their own grant award.

Recipients are responsible for providing updated performance reports using the SF-PPR on a biannual basis.

Recipients must submit the cover page of the SF-PPR as an attachment to the ND Grants system.

The SF-PPR can be accessed online at http://www.na.fs.fed.us/fap/SF-PPR_Cover%20Sheet.pdf.

As part of the SF-PPR, recipients will be required to report on progress towards implementing the following performance measures: ? For fusion centers, the achievement of capabilities and compliance with measurement requirements within the Maturation and Enhancement of State and Major Urban Area Fusion Centers priority through the annual Fusion Center Assessment Program managed by the DHS Office of Intelligence and Analysis (I&A) and reported to DHS/FEMA.State Preparedness Report (SPR) Submittal.

The SPR is an annual capability assessment.

The Post-Katrina Emergency Management Reform Act of 2006 (PKEMRA) requires an SPR from any state/territory receiving Federal preparedness assistance administered by DHS/FEMA.

Each state submits an annual SPR to DHS/FEMA.

Federal Financial Report (FFR) ? required quarterly.

Obligations and expenditures must be reported on a quarterly basis through the FFR (SF-425).

A report must be submitted for every quarter of the period of performance, including partial calendar quarters, as well as for periods where no grant activity occurs.

Future awards and fund draw downs may be withheld if these reports are delinquent.

The final FFR is due 90 days after the end date of the performance period.

FFRs must be filed electronically through PARS.

Grant Close-Out Process.

DHS/FEMA will close out the grant award when it determines that all applicable administrative actions and all required work of the HSGP award have been completed by the recipient.

This section summarizes the actions that the recipient must take to complete the closeout process in accordance with 2 C.F.R.

§ 200.343 at the end of the grant?s period of performance or the issuance of a Grant Amendment Notice issued to close out the grant. Within 90 days after the end of the period of performance, or after an amendment has been issued to close out a grant, whichever comes first, recipients must submit a final FFR and final progress report detailing all accomplishments and a qualitative summary of the impact of those accomplishments throughout the period of performance, as well as the following documentation: 1) Final request for payment, if applicable; 2) SF-425 ?Final Federal Financial Report; 3) SF-PPR ? Final Performance Progress Report; 4) A qualitative narrative summary on the impact of those accomplishments throughout the entire period of performance submitted to the respective Grant Programs Directorate (GPD) HQ Program Analyst in a Word document; 5) SF-428 ? Tangible Personal Property Report ? Inventory of all tangible personal property acquired using funds from this award.

6) Other documents required by program guidance or terms and conditions of the award.

If applicable, an inventory of all construction projects that used funds from this program has to be reported using the Real Property Status Report (Standard Form SF 429) available at http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/omb/grants/approved_forms/sf-429.pdf. Additionally, the recipient must liquidate all obligations incurred under the HSGP award no later than 90 calendar days after the end date of the period of performance or issuance of a Grant Amendment Notice that closes out the award, whichever comes first.

Recipients who do not liquidate their obligations within this time period may have the costs of their unliquidated obligations disallowed.

Recipients are also responsible for promptly returning to DHS/FEMA the balance of any funds that have been drawn down, but remain unliquidated. After these reports have been reviewed and approved by DHS/FEMA, a close-out notice will be completed to close out the grant.

The notice will indicate the period of performance as closed, list any remaining funds the recipient has not drawn down that will be deobligated, and address requirements for record retention, and disposition and reporting requirements for any equipment or real property purchased using THSGP grant funding.

In addition, any HSGP recipient that issues subawards to any subrecipient is responsible for closing out those subawards as described in 2 C.F.R.

§ 200.343.

HSGP recipients must ensure that they complete the closeout of their subawards in time to submit all necessary documentation and information to DHS/FEMA during the closeout of their own grant award.

Recipients will be monitored on an annual and as needed basis by DHS/FEMA staff, both programmatically and financially, to ensure that the project goals, objectives, performance requirements, timelines, milestone completion, budgets, and other related program criteria are being met. Monitoring may be accomplished through desk-based reviews on-site monitoring visits, or both.

Monitoring will involve the review and analysis of the financial, programmatic, performance, compliance and administrative processes, policies, activities, and other attributes of each Federal assistance award and will identify areas where technical assistance, corrective actions and other support may be needed.

Audits

In accordance with the provisions of 2 CFR 200, Subpart F - Audit Requirements, non-Federal entities that expend financial assistance of $750,000 or more in Federal awards will have a single or a program-specific audit conducted for that year. Non-Federal entities that expend less than $750,000 a year in Federal awards are exempt from Federal audit requirements for that year, except as noted in 2 CFR 200.503. These audits are due to the cognizant Federal agency, submitted through the Federal Audit Clearinghouse, not later than 9 months after the end of the grantees fiscal year.

Records

Grant records shall be retained for a period of 3 years from the day the recipient submits its final expenditure report. If any litigation, claim, negotiation, audit, or other action involving the records has been started before the expiration of the 3-year period, the records must be retained until completion of the action and resolution of all issues which arise from it, or until the end of the regular 3-year period, whichever is later. Grant records include financial and program/progress reports, support documents, statistical records, and other documents that support the activity and/or expenditure of the recipient or sub-recipient under the award.

Financial Information

Account Identification

70-0560-0-1-999.

Obigations

(Formula Grants) FY 16 $1,037,000,000; FY 17 est $1,037,000,000; and FY 18 est $1,037,000,000 - FY 2017 : (SHSP) $402,000,000 (UASI) $580,000,000 (OPSG) $55,000,000.

Range and Average of Financial Assistance

For more information, refer to the FY 2017 HSGP and THSGP Notice of Funding Opportunity.

Regulations, Guidelines, and Literature

FY 2017 HSGP Notice of Funding Opportunity.

Information Contacts

Regional or Local Office

See Regional Agency Offices. Additional information (Please include additional information, if applicable) FEMA Regions may also provide fiscal support, including pre- and post-award administration and technical assistance, to the grant programs included in this solicitation.

Headquarters Office

Grant Programs Directorate DHS/FEMA 400 C Street, SW , Washington, District of Columbia 20472-3615 Phone: (1-800) 368-6498

Criteria for Selecting Proposals

FY 2017 SHSP and UASI are non-competitive programs. For additional information on FY 2017 SHSP and UASI allocations, refer to the FY 2017 HSGP Notice of Funding Opportunity. Funds for FY 2017 OPSG will be allocated competitively. This includes the use of risk-based prioritization using CBP Sector-specific border risk to include, but not limited to: threat, vulnerability, miles of border, and other border-specific law enforcement intelligence. Each applicant?s final funding allocation will be determined by using a combination of the results of the risk analysis and feasibility of the Operations Orders. In order to be eligible to receive THSGP funding, grantees must be considered ?directly eligible Tribes.? Per the 9/11 Act, the term ?directly eligible Tribe? means ? (A) any Indian Tribe ? (i) that is located in the continental United States; (ii) that operates a law enforcement or emergency response agency with the capacity to respond to calls for law enforcement or emergency services; (iii) a. that is located on or near (50 miles) an international border or a coastline bordering an ocean (including the Gulf of Mexico) or international waters (excluding shoreline border around the Great Lakes); b. that is located within 10 miles of a system or asset included on the prioritized critical infrastructure list established under section 210E(a)(2) [please refer to section 1001 of the 9/11 Act] or has such a system or asset within its territory; c. that is located within or contiguous to one of the 50 most populous metropolitan statistical areas in the United States; or d. the jurisdiction of which includes not less than 1,000 square miles of Indian country, as that term is defined in section 1151 of title 18, United States Code; and (iv) that certifies to the Secretary that a State has not provided funds under section 2003 [UASI] or 2004 [SHSP] to the Indian Tribe or consortium of Indian Tribes for the purpose for which direct funding is sought; and (B) a consortium of Indian Tribes, if each Tribe satisfies the requirements of subparagraph (A). In summary, eligible Tribes must meet the requirements set forth in (A) (i), and (A) (ii), and (A) (iv). Tribes must also meet one of the requirements set forth in (A) (iii); either (A) (iii) (a), or (A) (iii) (b), or (A) (iii) (c), or (A) (iii) (d). Finally, (B) may also be satisfied, if each Tribe satisfies the requirements of subparagraph (A). In FY 2017, applicants must self-certify as to whether they meet the eligibility requirements. Self-certification will be provided on the THSGP Eligibility Certification Form as part of Application Investment Justification. Any questions regarding an applicant?s proximity to a Critical Infrastructure and Key Structures (CI/KR) site, as described in the eligibility criteria, may be directed to the State Administrative Agency (SAA). Any additional questions regarding the overall self-certification of eligibility process may be directed to the CSID.



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Social Enterprise Trains Migrants and Refugees with Fashion-Industry Skills

Sydney TAFE has teamed with a new clothing and retail social enterprise, The Social Outfit charity, to launch a dynamic collaboration that would enable students to gain real fashion industry skills and take on their own creativity and rich cultural heritage to produce garments for The Social Outfit’s store and adjoining workshop in Newtown.




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